🎧 ‚ÄėThe Daily‚Äô: Sexual Harassment‚Äôs Toll on Careers | New York Times

Listened to ‚ÄėThe Daily‚Äô: Sexual Harassment‚Äôs Toll on Careers by Michael Barbaro from nytimes.com

In a case that highlights the economic consequences of sexual harassment and retaliation, Ashley Judd is suing Harvey Weinstein for the damage he did to her career after she rebuffed his advances.

And in the second part of the episode, three women who pioneered the language of consent reflect on being far ahead of their time on the politics of sex.

On today’s episode:

‚Äʬ†Jodi Kantor, one of the investigative reporters at The New York Times who broke the story about the raft of sexual harassment accusations against Mr. Weinstein, discusses the implications of a new lawsuit.

‚ÄĘ We hear from¬†Juliet Brown, Christelle Evans and Bethany Saltman, who helped to establish an affirmative consent policy for sex at Antioch College in 1990.

Background reading:

‚ÄĘ Ms. Judd¬†filed a lawsuit on Monday¬†accusing Mr. Weinstein of harming her career by spreading lies about her after she rejected his sexual requests. Her claim is corroborated by the director Peter Jackson, who revealed last year that Mr. Weinstein had warned him not to hire the actress for his ‚ÄúLord of the Rings‚ÄĚ franchise.

‚ÄĘ Antioch College students¬†developed a sexual consent policy¬†in the 1990s. It was mocked by much of the rest of the world. Since then, campuses across the country have caught up, and¬†a new generation of Antioch students is pushing the conversation further.

‚ÄĘ A Times video journalist¬†recalls being asked to sign a verbal consent form¬†during a visit to Antioch College in 2004, long before the language of sexual consent had entered the mainstream.

It’s long been an open secret in casting related discussions that people’s character and habits are maligned to push decisions in one direction or another, and often in ways that harm not only the person’s career, but their future potential for hiring. In most other industries, this would be easily litigated or at least brought up. I’m glad to see it may be banned outright as a result of cases like these.

Having gone to college in the 90’s myself I also remember the Antioch College agreements. Though they may have gone a bit too far, it’s obvious they were generally right in re-balancing the power in relationships as well as being well ahead of their times.

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