I’ve been seemingly “away” from my online presence for several months, but felt it’s time to come back to posting publicly a bit more frequently. Some of the hiatus has been set aside for crafting some new workflows for posting more content privately for a slightly different version of my commonplace book. 

While I’ve learned a lot in my experiment, I’ll have to ruminate on it a bit longer before writing any specific takeaways. One of my favorite portions has been some work to pull more data out of the books I’m reading in terms of highlights, notes, and marginalia for research purposes. 

In general, not much has changed here directly, but I will have to get used to the the posting interface and some of my old workflows again. I’ll also need to get around to some general updates and fixes that I’ve let slide for far too long. I’ll also have to catch up on some change logs for things that have improved since my hiatus began.

I will say that while I’ve been very productive during my hiatus, which has included stepping away significantly from other forms of social media consumption as well, I also very much miss interacting with a lot of my online friends and colleagues on a more regular basis. It’ll be good to ease back into my feed reader and see what everyone has been up to for the past several months.

WordPress and IndieWeb: Creating Your Dialtone on the Internet

Next weekend, I’ll be giving a talk at the third annual WordCamp Riverside on Saturday, November 9th at 11:00 AM Pacific in the Innovation room. If you haven’t registered already, there are still tickets left for purchase.

After having watched the livestream of Tantek Çelik’s invited talk at WordCamp US entitled Take Back Your Web, I’ll note that my intention is to generally pick up from where he left off and get into some of the nuts and bolts of what some of the IndieWeb philosophies and technologies are and how they work with WordPress. (Though don’t worry if you missed his talk, I’ll put all the ideas into their larger context.) I’ll approach it from the perspective of a WordPress beginner, but will have some pointers to lots of in-depth resources for designers and developers. In short, I’ll attempt to provide a crash-course overview of what the IndieWeb looks like from a WordPress perspective.

Below is a brief teaser for the talk:

Welcome to Web 3.0, the internet you always wish you had.

I can have phone service on Verizon and you may choose to use AT&T, T-Mobile, or Sprint, but as long as we’ve got phones we can talk to each other or any other phone number that’s connected to the network. But why can’t Facebook users interact directly with Twitter users or Instagram users or vice versa? Crucially why couldn’t one website built on WordPress talk to another website built with Drupal or Kirby? The internet is an open communication platform after all! I’m going to show how this (and so much more magic) can all be done with some simple plugins in under an hour!
Over the past several years a group of dedicated bloggers, technologists, and designers has been innovating, building, and testing a suite of open W3C web standards to allow their personal websites to recreate the major pieces of interactive functionality that are part of the largest social media sites like Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn, SoundCloud, etc. These larger pieces are now all working together across dozens of content management systems including WordPress, Drupal, WithKnown, ProcessWire, Elgg, Nucleus CMS, Craft, Django, Kirby, static site generators like Hugo and Jekyll and services like Micro.Blog and Mastodon. This means that instead of relying on smaller non-interoperable social media sites that obsessively surveil you and then pollute your stream with obtrusive ads, you can now better own and control your own data and comprehensive identity on your own domain name. In this talk we’ll take a high level look at W3C web specs including Webmention, WebSub, Micropub, and the forthcoming Microsub to see how you can make your own website a first class citizen on the (social) web. Using WordPress and a few simple plugins you can now close the circle of website-to-website intercommunication across the open web. Use your own website to read and consume web content, post your own status updates, bookmarks, likes, and replies while interacting directly with other websites. In many cases you can also do this with social platforms like Twitter, Instagram, Flickr, GitHub, Mastodon, and Micro.blog.

Replied to a tweet by Cathie LeBlancCathie LeBlanc (Twitter)
“@jgmac1106 We don't yet have meetups but we should! @mburtis @actualham @PSUOpenCoLab”
Perhaps you might borrow the set up of Homebrew Website Club so you don’t have to reinvent the wheel? You can always change the name to something like DoOO or Domains Meetup, but it would give you a place to start. Like Greg indicated I’m happy to help remotely as well.
For those having issues with Kinja this week, know that IndieWeb.org may have some useful ideas and solutions for the possible site-death.
There are lots of ideas for back up at https://indieweb.org/archival_copy, including Ben Welsh’s savemy.news which will help you to quickly archive your pages.
Replied to a post by @bix @bix (micro.blog)
I’ve started building a list of blogs and newsletters, although currently it’s just a subset of my full list of subscriptions. I’ll add more as I decide what I’m going to continue to follow longterm. The inclusion of newsletters is why it’s not a “blogroll”.
@bix, it’s interesting to see others experimenting with these sorts of things. I hadn’t thought of adding any newsletters (and I don’t subscribe to more than one or two), but I’ve built a huge, categorized following page which includes OPML subscription links as well. 

There are some details and links to how I did it in WordPress for those who are interested: From Following Posts and Blogrolls (Following Pages) with OPML to Microsub servers and Readers.

👓 Newsletter Development: 1 | WARREN ELLIS LTD

Read Newsletter Development: 1 by Warren EllisWarren Ellis (WARREN ELLIS LTD)
Which needs a better title, but this is a blogchain (thanks again for that term/process, Venkatesh) about developing out Orbital Operations and adding new things to it. I have just starting batchin…