Replied to a tweet by Stephanie Stimac Web WitchStephanie Stimac Web Witch (Twitter)
Coincidentally I ran across SpaceHey earlier today, and I had the very same thought…

I prefer living in the slightly older blogosphere though. Maybe with some improved infrastructure over what we’ve lost?

Winter Counts and related holiday traditions

Some indigenous American tribes kept annual winter counts which served as both a physical historical account of their year, but served as visual mnemonic devices leveraging a bit of the idea of a drawn memory palace along with spaced repetition by adding a new image to their “journey” each year.

I was reminded about the idea over the weekend by a dreadful, cheeseball Hallmark Holiday movie A Royal Christmas Ball (2017) (please don’t torture yourself by watching it). The two main characters had a Christmas ritual of creating a holiday ornament every year for their Christmas tree with a design that represented something significant in their lives that year. Because most families generally use and reuse the same ornaments every year, the practice becomes a repeated ritual which allows them to reminisce over each ornament every year to remember past years. It’s a common occurrence (at least in Western society) for people to purchase souvenir ornaments when they travel, and these serve the same effect of remembering their past travels.

If others haven’t come across this idea as a fun mnemonic device for the whole family with built in spaced repetition, I recommend you give it a try. Just don’t everyone necessarily make coronavirus ornaments for this year.

Non-Christians could leverage a similar idea for their annual holidays, feasts, or events if they like. Of course, you could follow the Lakota tribe and make a more traditional winter count.

For those interested in some of the further history and description of the idea of an annual count in the framing of mnemotechny, I would recommend LynneKelly’s book Memory Craft or some of her more academic works.

I’ve randomly noticed an odd dip in the use of patriarchy, patriarchal, and feminism as words in Google’s nGram Viewer starting around a peak in 1999-2000 and continuing until 2008-2009. I’m curious what may have caused this? One could also add the word “gender” which shows a similar dip, but it tends to drown out the signal of the other three, so I’ve removed it here.

nGram Viewer of three words with very similar usage graphs

Reposted a tweet by Julia Angwin
#ScrapingIsNotACrime
Read VCBrags did one last thing before deleting their account: a frame-up (savingjournalism.substack.com)
[Editor’s Note: It’s now November 10th, some two months after initial publication. I received substantial feedback about my presentation of the evidence here, and I believe a postmortem is warranted. I reached out to VCBrags on October 5th to see if they’d cooperate. I have yet to receive a reply. I expect to publish something this month either way, which I’ll link here at the top. All the other edit marks below are from the first 24 hours or so. The post hasn’t been touched since.]
Read @VCBrags, Viciousness, and Pasquale D'Silva (Sonya Supposedly)
I'm sure Pasquale won't mind serving as a case study, given his glee at the association: I’m HONORED / BLESSED that some of you Silicon Valley tech dweebs think that I was @vcbrags. To be honest, I’m so dumb about VC, half the jokes from the account flew over
Read The Enduring Mystery Around An Anonymous Twitter Account That Infuriated Tech’s Kingpins—And Nearly Ruined A Founder’s Reputation by Abram Brown (Forbes)
By lampooning venture capitalists, @VCBrags accumulated an audience that included billionaires Jack Dorsey and Mark Cuban—and enmity from many of the people it skewered.