📖 Read pages 14-30 of 592 of Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America by Ibram X. Kendi

📖 Read pages 14-30 of 592 of Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America by Ibram X. Kendi

Chapters 1 & 2 are an overview of prior history of ancient Greece and the “climate theory” of Aristotle and then the Genesis 9:18-29 “curse of Ham” (son of Noah) as the early roots of racism. It then moves into the slave trade of Portugal with Zuarara, Ibn Khaldūn, Las Casas, a Leo Africanus’ writings and their effect on the roots of modern racism.

Given the politics of the day, its curious to note that so many Republican party members would simultaneously be climate deniers on the one hand, and climate believers on the other.

As I look at the title of the forthcoming chapter 3 “Coming to America”, I can’t help but think about the potential ironies of the relationship to the text and the Eddie Murphy film of the same title.

On page 21 Kendi writes:

As strictly a climate theorist, Ibn Khaldūn discarded the “silly story” of the curse of Ham.

Here he references this to The Muqaddimah: An Introduction to History by Ibn Khaldūn, Franz Rosenthal, and N.J. Dawood (Princeton University Press, 1969). I’m curious exactly where the “silly story” portion stems? Is it from Ibn Khaldūn directly in translation or from the more modern book? Given that Ibn Khaldūn lived from 1332-1406 and certainly didn’t write in English, I’m curious about the original translation by which the phrase “silly story” comes about. Silly has an archaic meaning of “helpless; defenseless” (roughly around the time of Shakespeare) prior to its modern definition, and prior to that it derived from the Old English word “seely” which meant “blessed”. Given that the phrase is used to describe a passage from Genesis, it’s entirely possible that the word “silly” held the “blessed” connotation here, but it’s not obvious from the context or the reference which is the proper meaning to take. Certainly taking the modern definition on its face seems like the wrong path to take here. I wonder if Kendi could shed some additional light on his sources to clarify the issue?

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📖 Read pages i-15 of 592 of Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America by Ibram X. Kendi

📖 Read pages i-15 of 592 of Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America by Ibram X. Kendi

An interesting couple of starting theses to re-frame the story:

  • There are three sides, and
  • It is racial discrimination – > racial ideas – > ignorance/hate that is the causal relationship driving America’s history of race relations.

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📕 Read pages 177-231 of 288 of Linked: The New Science Of Networks by Albert-László Barabási

📕 Read pages 177-231 of 288 to finish Linked: The New Science Of Networks by Albert-László Barabási

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📖 Read pages 167-177 of Linked: The New Science Of Networks by Albert-László Barabási

📖 Read pages 167-177 of 288 of Linked: The New Science Of Networks by Albert-László Barabási

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📖 Read pages 146-167 of 288 of Linked: The New Science Of Networks by Albert-László Barabási

📖 Read pages 146-167 of 288 of Linked: The New Science Of Networks by Albert-László Barabási

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📖 Read pages 123-146 of 288 of Linked: The New Science Of Networks by Albert-László Barabási

📖 Read pages 123-146 of 288 of Linked: The New Science Of Networks by Albert-László Barabási

AIDs and epidemiology related research

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📖 Read pages 112-123 of 288 of Linked: The New Science Of Networks by Albert-László Barabási

📖 Read pages 112-123 of 288 of Linked: The New Science Of Networks by Albert-László Barabási

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📖 Read pages 93-112 of 288 of Linked: The New Science Of Networks by Albert-László Barabási

📖 Read pages 93-112 of 288 of Linked: The New Science Of Networks by Albert-László Barabási

An interesting overlap of Bose condensation mathematics and physics into network theory.

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📖 Read pages 79-92 of 288 of Linked: The New Science Of Networks by Albert-László Barabási

📖 Read pages 79-92 of 288 of Linked: The New Science Of Networks by Albert-László Barabási

He’s continuing the evolving story of network research following along some of his own research and that of others. There’s something unsettling or missing here in the jump to preferential attachment. What is causing preferential attachment to occur? This may be a factor of the individual settings in which things are happening, but it feels like a major missing piece from an otherwise organic feeling mathematical/theoretical perspective.

📖 Read pages 13-79 of 288 of Linked: The New Science Of Networks by Albert-László Barabási

📖 Read pages 13-79 of 288 of Linked: The New Science Of Networks by Albert-László Barabási

It’s an interesting overview of the subject of network science and complexity. Potentially good if you know nothing of the area at all, or if you’re about to delve heavily into the topic. I’m breezing through it quickly with an eye toward reading his more technical level networks textbook that came out two years ago as well as some of his papers in the area.

Some of the pieces so far are relatively overwritten given that it’s now more than 15 years later… but the general audience then probably needed the extra back story. The only math so far is at the level of simple logarithms and the few equations are buried in the footnotes.

There are some useful rules of thumb he’s introduced for the generalists and engineers in the crowd like the idea of things that fall into an 80/20 Pareto rule are very likely power law models.

He’s repeated some common stories about Paul Erdős and Alfréd Rényi. I hadn’t heard the story about Erdős saying there were too many plus signs on the Notre Dame campus–that was kind of cute. I did enjoy that he’d dug at least an additional layer deeper to pull up Frigyes Karinthy’s short story “Chains” to introduce the original(?) conceptualization of the idea of Six Degrees of Separation.

I’ll circle back later for additional highlights and annotations.

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📖 Read through page 13 of 288 of Linked: The New Science Of Networks by Albert-László Barabási

📖 Read through page 13 of 288 of Linked: The New Science Of Networks by Albert-László Barabási

So far a very facile opening. Somewhat surprised to see a reference to Jesus and Paul here, but interestingly apropos.

Highlights, Quotes, & Marginalia

Introduction

…the high barriers to becoming a Christian had to be abolished. Circumcision and the strict food laws had to be relaxed.

Highlight (yellow) – 1. Introduction > page 4

Naturally, if you make it easier to be a Christian, then it will be easier to create links and grow the network

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