Read Making Our Mark: 2021 Innovator in Residence to Focus on Creative Notetaking (The Library of Congress)
The strike-throughs, underlines, doodles, and marginalia made by historical figures in their personal papers at the Library of Congress give researchers a more intimate sense of who they were. These markings sometimes shed light on the story of how a work was made or received. Researchers can understand more about the creative process, opinions and musings of people throughout the centuries by understanding these historical markings that are often, literally and figuratively, in the margins. Artist and educator Courtney McClellan is inspired by this tradition of mark-making, and today the Library of Congress announced her appointment as 2021 Innovator in Residence.McClellan’s project, Speculative Annotation, will invite Americans to join this historical lineage of annotators by creatively engaging with a curated collection of free to use items from the
I Annotate 2021 in I Annotate 2021 | Program ()

Bookmarked on 2021-06-20 at 7:19 PM; Read on 2021-06-21 at 5:22 PM

doodles 

aka drolleries

Annotated on June 21, 2021 at 05:19PM

These markings sometimes shed light on the story of how a work was made or received. Researchers can understand more about the creative process, opinions and musings of people throughout the centuries by understanding these historical markings that are often, literally and figuratively, in the margins. 

In addition to looking in the margins, one must also look at contemporaneous copies of both printed and privately held (or collected) commonplace books to cast a wider net on these practices.

Annotated on June 21, 2021 at 05:21PM

The project will be available in summer 2021 on labs.loc.gov. 

Return to this project in July 2021 to see it in action.

Annotated on June 21, 2021 at 05:22PM

Read A Year in Marginalia by Sam Anderson (The Millions)
The writing I enjoy doing most, every year, is marginalia: spontaneous bursts of pure, private response to whatever book happens to be in front of me. It’s the most intimate, complete, and honest form of criticism possible — not the big wide-angle aerial shot you get from an official review essay, but a moment-by-moment record of what a book actually feels like to the actively reading brain. 
This is a phenomenal way to do a look back at a year in reading. I’ll have to consider how to pull it off for myself this year.
 
Annotated ‘What I Really Want Is Someone Rolling Around in the Text’ by Sam Anderson (nytimes.com)
The practice, back then, was surprisingly social — people would mark up books for one another as gifts, or give pointedly annotated novels to potential lovers. 
This could be an interesting gift idea. Definitely shows someone that you were actively thinking about them for extended lengths of time while they were away.
 

It’s also sort of founding example for the idea of social annotation given that most prior annotation was for personal use. (Though Owen Gingerich has shown that early annotations were copied from book to book and early scribes added annotations to texts for readers as well.)

It also demonstrates the idea of proof of work (in this case love “work”), which is part of the reason that social annotation in an educational setting using tools like Hypothes.is is worthwhile. Students are indicating (via social signaling) to a teacher that they’ve read and actively engaged with the course material.

Of course, unlike the example, they’re not necessarily showing “true love” of the material!

Writer Jean Paul (1763-1825) on the importance of his Zettelkasten, kept in the form of a commonplace book:

“In the event of a fire, the black-bound excerpts are to be saved first.”
—Jean Paul instructions to his wife before setting off on a trip in 1812 (as quoted in translation from Exhibition opening on March 4th: »Zettelkästen. Maschinen der Phantasie«)

Featured image: Heinrich Pfenninger, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

Read Obsidian Release v0.12.0 (Obsidian Forum)
Shiny new things You can now search for tasks using task: similar to block:. There is also task-todo: and task-done: which will match only the tasks that are incomplete or complete, respectively. Use task:"" to match all tasks. Search and backlink results has been significantly reworked: Search results are now always expanded, instead of showing “… and x more matches”. “Show more context” will now show the markdown block, instead of a fixed number of lines before and after the match. There are...

Task lists [x] can now contain any character to indicate a completed task, instead of just x. This value can be used by custom CSS to change the appearance of the check mark, and is also available for plugins to use.

I’ll need to create some custom CSS for these in the past as I’ve used:
* - [>] to indicate that an item was pushed forward
* - [?] to indicate something I’m not sure was done in retrospect (typically for a particular day)
* - [~] to indicate something that didn’t occur, but is “done” anyway
* others?
Annotated on May 20, 2021 at 01:00PM

You can now search for tasks using task: similar to block:. There is also task-todo: and task-done: which will match only the tasks that are incomplete or complete, respectively. Use task:"" to match all tasks.

This will be incredibly useful to create as a view.
Annotated on May 20, 2021 at 01:03PM

Read Annotation by chrisaldrich@hypothes.is on Letter to freenode (Hypothes.is)

Posted on Freenode Limited on the morning of May 12, 2021 US PST: 

For context, here’s the other side: https://gist.github.com/joepie91/df80d8d36cd9d1bde46ba018af497409
Annotated on May 20, 2021 at 09:12AM

I simply want freenode to keep on being a great IRC network, and to support it financially and legally as I have for a long time now. 

Simply?

What’s the long term plan/goal here in owning and controlling it? If it’ out of the goodness of your heart, why not set up a foundation and donate the money to that? Why need/have corporate ownership or control unless there’s some other motivation?
Annotated on May 20, 2021 at 09:11AM

Quoted by Jeremy KeithJeremy Keith (adactio.com)

I love my website. Even though it isn’t a physical thing, I think it might be my most prized possession.

It’s a place for me to think and a place for me to link.

A stark statement to make about one’s website. I feel exactly the same way.
 
 
Read OERxDomains21’s Headless Program by Jim GroomJim Groom (bavatuesdays.com)
It’s the day before OERxDomains21 and I am blogging, that’s a good sign, I think….regardless, it’s happening! And, given I still have a blog, I have the distinct pleasure to share with you my favorite part of the conference thus far—the TV Guide -inspired program.

to re-phrase a famous line from Zach Davis, “Behind every EDUPUNK is a frazzled web developer.” 

Annotated on April 20, 2021 at 11:17AM

Read Podcasting, RSS, Openness, and Choice by Michael MignanoMichael Mignano (Medium)
In the coming months and years, we’ll be working to further enable choice for creators, including giving them the power to choose not only how someone wants to create or monetize audio, but also where specific content is able to be consumed, ensuring creators have an opportunity to decide if they are aligned with the platforms distributing their content.

The open RSS standard has provided immense value to the growth of the podcasting ecosystem over the past few decades. 

Why do I get the sinking feeling that the remainder of this article will be maniacally saying, “and all of that ends today!”
Annotated on April 19, 2021 at 09:34AM

We also believe that in order to democratize audio and achieve Spotify’s mission of enabling a million creators to live off of their art, we must work to enable greater choice for creators. This choice becomes increasingly important as audio becomes even easier to create and share. 

Dear Anchor/Spotify, please remember that “democratize” DOES NOT equal surveillance capitalism. In fact, Facebook and others have shown that doing what you’re probably currently planning for the podcasting space will most likely work against democracy.
Annotated on April 19, 2021 at 09:13AM

In the coming months and years, we’ll be working to further enable choice for creators, including giving them the power to choose not only how someone wants to create or monetize audio, but also where specific content is able to be consumed, ensuring creators have an opportunity to decide if they are aligned with the platforms distributing their content. 

So this means you’re going to use simple, open standards and tooling so that not only Anchor and Spotify will benefit?

Or are you going to build closed systems that require the use of proprietary software and thus force subscriptions?

Are you going to Balkanize the audio space to force consumers into your product and only your product? Or will producers be able to have a broad selection of platforms to which they could easily export and distribute their content?
Annotated on April 19, 2021 at 08:57AM

Thus, the creative freedom of creators is limited. 

And thus draconian methods for making the distribution unnecessarily complicated, siloed, surveillance capitalized, and over-monitized beyond all comprehension are beyond the reach of one or two for profit companies who want to own the entire market like monopolistic giants are similarly limited. (But let’s just stick with the creators we’re pretending to champion, shall we?)
Annotated on April 19, 2021 at 09:07AM

tl;dr: Anchor: We’re doing this not so much because creators say they want it, but because we really, really want it. P.S.: We don’t care at all what our listeners think, and so have nothing to say about their freedom.

Read Domain of One’s Own by Karlheinz Pape (Corporate Learning Community)
Eher zufällig bin ich auf den Workshop der Medienwerkstatt von Studiumdigitale der Uni Frankfurt M am 23.3.2021 zum Konzept der „Domain of One’s Own“ für Studenten gestoßen. Die Idee hat ganz viel …
Great to see some DoOO material in German/Germany.

In Deutschland ist bisher noch keine Anwendung bekannt
Die HOOU Hamburg Open Online University fördert derzeit ein DoOO Projekt. Projektmitarbeiter sind Christian Friedrich und Katharina Schulz. (Beide haben auch den Workshop an der Uni Frankfurt gehalten). Das Projekt hat eine Webseite: https://domain-of-ones-own.de/. 

Rough translation:

So far no application is known in Germany

The HOOU Hamburg Open Online University is currently funding a DoOO project. Project team members are Christian Friedrich and Katharina Schulz . (Both also held the workshop at the University of Frankfurt). The project has a website: https://domain-of-ones-own.de/ .

Annotated on April 11, 2021 at 05:43PM