Reply to 5 CMS tools for indie bloggers | Indie Digital Media

Replied to 5 CMS tools for indie bloggers by Richard MacManus (Indie Digital Media)
This is a golden age for indie digital media creators, who have more content creation options than ever in 2019. In fact, there are arguably too many tools to chose from. That’s why I’m going to regularly examine the tools of digital media creation here on IDM - for everything…

I’ve primarily relied on WordPress.org for ages and have and have often used WithKnown, but I also have a few sites using Drupal. While I wouldn’t suggest non-technical folks using Drupal, whose technical requirements have rapidly been increasing over the past several years, I would recommend taking a look at a fantastic Drupal fork called BackDrop CMS.

While it still has a lot in common with Drupal, it has reconfigured the core to include some of the most commonly used and requested plugins and they’ve done their best to make it prettier and easier to use for hobby-ists and bloggers as well as small businesses and non-profits that don’t need all the additional overhead that Drupal brings. It’s also got a small but very dedicated community of developers and users.

I’ve also been hearing some great things about Craft CMS, which you highlight, as well as Perch by Rachel Andrew and Drew McLellan.

👓 Gary Pendergast Praises ClassicPress, Extends Invitation for Collaboration | WordPress Tavern

Read Gary Pendergast Praises ClassicPress, Extends Invitation for Collaboration (WordPress Tavern)
Gutenberg and WordPress core contributor Gary Pendergast has weighed in with this thoughts on ClassicPress, a fork of WordPress created by Scott Bowler. Pendergast praises the fork and extended an …

The potential forking of WordPress like this actually could present an interesting opportunity for the broader community and the platform. It reminds me a bit of the BackDrop fork of Drupal and how it has benefited both platforms going forward. BackDrop has about 100 solid contributors that are building and iterating much more rapidly on their platform than the bigger behemoth of Drupal. As a result, new plugins and cleaner UI have entered their core and improved more rapidly with active dogfooding while their security teams collaborate closely and pushes go back and forth between the two. In the end both platforms end up benefiting tremendously. Naturally the two need to have some collegiality and collaboration to help make sure this happens.

Drutopia’s mission sounds a little to me like Drupal with Indieweb philosophy baked in from the start. It’s also not too different from Backdrop CMS’s mission as a Drupal fork.