Reply to 5 CMS tools for indie bloggers | Indie Digital Media

Replied to 5 CMS tools for indie bloggers by Richard MacManus (Indie Digital Media)
This is a golden age for indie digital media creators, who have more content creation options than ever in 2019. In fact, there are arguably too many tools to chose from. That’s why I’m going to regularly examine the tools of digital media creation here on IDM - for everything…

I’ve primarily relied on WordPress.org for ages and have and have often used WithKnown, but I also have a few sites using Drupal. While I wouldn’t suggest non-technical folks using Drupal, whose technical requirements have rapidly been increasing over the past several years, I would recommend taking a look at a fantastic Drupal fork called BackDrop CMS.

While it still has a lot in common with Drupal, it has reconfigured the core to include some of the most commonly used and requested plugins and they’ve done their best to make it prettier and easier to use for hobby-ists and bloggers as well as small businesses and non-profits that don’t need all the additional overhead that Drupal brings. It’s also got a small but very dedicated community of developers and users.

I’ve also been hearing some great things about Craft CMS, which you highlight, as well as Perch by Rachel Andrew and Drew McLellan.

👓 masterpost of tumblr alternatives | snowballphil

Read masterpost of tumblr alternatives (snowballphil.tumblr.com)

this post will be updated as I find more websites to add! please check with the original before reblogging to see if there’s an updated version, and message me with more suggestions if you have them!!

for general use

  • myspace.com - yes, it still exists, i’m just as surprised as you
  • soup.io - very similar to tumblr, plus it can import your tumblr blog
  • twitter.com - allows posting both text and photos in sets, allows retweets

geared towards writers and bloggers

geared towards artists and photographers

  • deviantart.com - huge community, allows posting art + sorting into folders
  • furaffinity.net - similar to DA but for furries, easy to display commish info
  • instagram.com - photo and video posts, excellent tag search
  • piczel.tv - allows both streaming and posting art / photosets to a gallery
  • pixiv.net - huge anime art community, allows livestreaming

paid platforms

  • patreon.com - subscription-based access to many diff types of content
  • pillowfort.io - still in beta, but should function almost identically to tumblr
  • typepad.com - similar to wordpress but with reblogging and a dash

ways to save your current tumblr posts

  • use the wayback machine! you do have to archive each page of your blog individually but once you do all the content, including media, will be saved exactly as it was at the moment you archived it.

  • wordpress and soup both allow you to directly import whole tumblr blogs, and if i recall correctly it’s something both dreamwidth and pillowfort have said they are working on.

  • if you have some knowledge of computers you can try this github solution which uses a python script to download your whole blog to your computer. even if you don’t know anything about programming or the command line they give a very good beginners tutorial on how to use it so you should still give it a shot!

post version 1.0, 2018-12-03 21:33

👓 After 5 years and $3M, here’s everything we’ve learned from building Ghost | Ghost

Read After 5 years and $3M, here's everything we've learned from building Ghost by John O'Nolan, Hannah Wolfe (Ghost)
It's always fun to use these milestones to take a step back and reflect on the journey so far. On previous birthdays I've talked about revenue milestones and product updates, but this year I'm going to focus more on all the things we've learned since we started.

In reading this, I took a look at downloading and self-hosting a copy of Ghost for myself, but the barrier and work involved was beyond my patience to bother with. For an open source project that prides itself on user experience, this seemed at odds. Perhaps this is playing itself out better for the paid monthly customers? But in this case, it doesn’t support many of the pieces of infrastructure I find de rigueur now: Webmention support and microformats which I understand they have no plans to support anytime soon.

Looking at their project pages and site though it does seem like they’ve got a reasonable layout and sales pitch for a CMS project, though it’s probably a bit too much overkill on selling when it could be simpler. Perhaps it might be a model for creating a stronger community facing page for the WithKnown open source project, presuming the education-focused corporate side continues as a status quo?

They did seem to be relatively straightforward in selling themselves against WordPress and what they were able to do and not do. I’m curious what specifically they’re doing to attract journalists? I couldn’t find anything specifically better than anything else on the market that would set it apart other than their promise on ease-of-use.

There were some interesting insights for those working within the IndieWeb community as well as businesses which might build themselves upon it.

Highlights:

Decentralised platforms fundamentally cannot compete on ease of setup. Nothing beats the UX of signing up for a centralised application.

We spent a very long time trying to compete on convenience and simplicity. This was our biggest mistake and the hardest lesson to learn.

How The Telegraph built its new CMS by focusing on simplicity | Nieman Lab

Read How The Telegraph built its new CMS by focusing on simplicity by Joseph Lichterman (Nieman Lab)
The British newspaper was previously using five separate online publishing systems, each of which larded up the publishing process with dozens of fiddly steps.

Chris Aldrich is reading “WordPress Without Shame”

Read WordPress Without Shame by Gina TrapaniGina Trapani (Track Changes)
By Gina Trapani, Director of Engineering, Postlight

 they actually use Medium for their core publication

This is definitely not an IndieWeb way to go!


But not every nail needs a fully-custom hammer.

Ain’t this the truth.