👓 Facebook asks U.S. banks for financial info to boost user engagement: WSJ | Reuters

Read Facebook in talks with banks to expand customer service (Reuters)
Facebook Inc said on Monday it is in talks to deepen links with banks and financial institutions, saying it can help the firms improve their customer service.

Yeah, this doesn’t seem like a horrible idea. Particularly given how good banks and Facebook are at using our data ethically and securely. </sarcasm>

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👓 The Information on School Websites Is Not as Safe as You Think | New York Times

Read The Information on School Websites Is Not as Safe as You Think (nytimes.com)
Some tracking scripts may be harmless. But others are designed to recognize I.P. addresses and embed cookies that collect information prized by advertisers.

The idiotic places we end up seeing surveillance capitalism just kills me.

Administrators: But they were give us the technology for free…
Really? Why not try pooling small pieces of resources within states to make these things you want and protect your charges? I know you think your budget is small, but it shouldn’t be this expensive.

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👓 Can we PLEASE talk about privacy, not GDPR, now? | Sebastian Greger

Read Can we PLEASE talk about privacy, not GDPR, now? by Sebastian Greger (Sebastian Greger)
It’s the “morning after”: a mere twelve hours have passed since the GDPR applies and while still awaiting breaking news on hobbyist blog owners being fined EUR 20 million, an army of burnt-out web and legal professionals has begun to clean up from the party that was “the final dash towards GDPR”.

A nice article pushing folks to focus more on the privacy portion of the discussion rather than the non-nonsensical technical GDPR regulations.

tl;dr: Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.

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🎧 Former Facebook Insider Says Company Cannot Be Trusted To Regulate Itself | NPR

Listened Former Facebook Insider Says Company Cannot Be Trusted To Regulate Itself by Ailsa Chang from All Things Considered | NPR.org

NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with Sandy Parakilas, who worked as an operations manager on the platform team at Facebook in 2011 and 2012. In the wake of the Cambridge Analytica scandal, Parakilas says Facebook cannot be trusted to regulate itself.

A bit “I-told-you-so” without any indication of how hard he may have fought for better handling of the data, but there were certainly others outside the company decrying their practices at the time.

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🎧 ‘The Daily’: Can Facebook Be Fixed? | The New York Times

Listened ‘The Daily’: Can Facebook Be Fixed? by Michael Barbaro from nytimes.com
Five days after details about Cambridge Analytica were made public, Mark Zuckerberg, the chief executive of Facebook, broke his silence on his company’s role in the data breach.

Minutes after posting a statement on Facebook, he spoke with The New York Times.



On today’s episode:
• Kevin Roose, a business columnist for The Times.

Background reading:
• Facebook, in crisis over the Cambridge Analytica data breach, vows to bolster security and privacy.
• A transcript of Mr. Zuckerberg’s conversation with Mr. Roose and another Times reporter, Sheera Frenkel.

I think Roose humanizes Zuckerberg a bit too much in his discussion of his interview. Facebook has some of the best and brightest engineering talent and a multi-billion dollar war chest. They’ve known about their pending problem for quite a while now and should have long since begun building a remedy. The plain truth is that they’ve actively chosen not to. Worse, even with the swirling problems in the public consciousness, they’re not actively doing anything much to fix things after-the-fact other than paying it some lip service. If Zuckerberg is as seemingly naive as Roose suggests, he needs to be removed from his position.

I’m coming much closer to calling it quits on Facebook. I’ve outlined a plan for extracting myself and just need to begin implementation. I’ve even got a potential scalable plan for family/friends who would like to leave as well.

I actually feel like my remaining on the platform is subsidizing keeping many third world people on it, and the way Facebook has been and is operating in many other countries it becomes a moral issue which is forcing me to actively seek to leave it.

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Following much of the recent Facebook privacy and data scandal over the past several days, 1–4 today I deleted 169 of 184 apps which had access to all or parts of my Facebook data. Often many of them also had access to data by proxy of my family, friends, and acquaintances.

Of those apps still remaining, 7 are apps that I’ve made personally, and the remainder solely help me export data from Facebook. Short of quitting the platform altogether, this feels like a good first step to limiting the data that I leak into the platform and their partners.

For several years now I’ve been posting content to my own personal website first and syndicating it to Facebook secondarily. Few, if any, of these old apps need any legitimate access to my account anymore presuming that they ever really did.

Want to do an audit of your own app access and make a similar purge? The IndieWeb community has some resources for doing so quickly. Looking for a better place to own and better control your own data? They can help there too.

References

1.
Graham-Harrison E, Cadwalladr C. Revealed: 50 million Facebook profiles harvested for Cambridge Analytica in major data breach. the Guardian. https://www.theguardian.com/news/2018/mar/17/cambridge-analytica-facebook-influence-us-election. Published March 17, 2018. Accessed March 20, 2018.
2.
Rosenberg, M, Confessore N, Cadwalladr C. How Trump Consultants Exploited the Facebook Data of Millions. The New York Times. https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/17/us/politics/cambridge-analytica-trump-campaign.html. Published March 17, 2018. Accessed March 20, 2018.
3.
Grewal P. Suspending Cambridge Analytica and SCL Group from Facebook | Facebook Newsroom. Facebook Newsroom. https://newsroom.fb.com/news/2018/03/suspending-cambridge-analytica/. Published March 16, 2018. Accessed March 20, 2018.
4.
Madrigal AC. What Took Facebook So Long? The Atlantic. https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2018/03/facebook-cambridge-analytica/555866/. Published March 10, 2016. Accessed March 20, 2018.
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