Replied to The IndieWeb and Webmentions by Brett TerpstraBrett Terpstra (BrettTerpstra.com)
I don’t know if you’ve noticed, but a while back I added a nifty feature to posts on this site which displays activity from Twitter and Mastodon (likes, retweets, replies) on each post. In most cases, more responses to my work happen on social media...
Be careful, because Webmention also means you’ll get responses from other websites too! Congratulations and welcome to the new world. I’ve added a link to your article to the IndieWeb Jekyll page which has some other useful resources too.

👓 I’m trying to modify @benbalter’s WordPress Jekyll Export plugin to extract serialzed data from post_meta values | Miklb Mindless Ramblings

Read a post by Michael BishopMichael Bishop (Miklb Mindless Ramblings)
Instead of rubber ducking, I’m writing it out here… I’m trying to modify @benbalter’s WordPress Jekyll Export plugin to extract serialzed data from post_meta values. It seems most (all?) of the IndieWeb WordPress plugins use serialized values so it’s necessary to migrate. Otherwise I wind ...
Replied to a tweet by Tom CritchlowTom Critchlow (Twitter)
“@jgmac1106 Thanks - been trying to get my head around webmentions for a while and still haven't figured it out....”
Tom, for the basics of what Webmention is you might try this intro article Webmentions: Enabling Better Communication on the Internet.

To get started quickly, just to have the notifications, you might try creating an account with Webmentions.io and put the endpoint into the <head> of your site so you can receive them in the erstwhile on a separate service and worry about direct integration at a later date. As I recall Aaron Gustafson has a Webmention.io Jekyll Plugin for display and some of the outline is covered in this recent article by Max Böck.

If necessary, you can get help in the #Dev channel of the IndieWeb chat.

Reply to Chris Finazzo about Jekyll and GoodReads alternatives

Replied to a tweet by Chris FinazzoChris Finazzo (Twitter)
I think Pelle Wessman has a Micropub solution for Jekyll which might allow you to use gRegorLove’s indiebookclub as a start. Asking in chat may help get you moving on other ideas/help if you need them.

👓 Static Indieweb pt2: Using Webmentions | Max Böck

Read Static Indieweb pt2: Using Webmentions by Max Böck (Max Böck - Frontend Web Developer)
How to pull interactions from social media platforms like Twitter back to your own site, using Webmentions, webmention.io and Bridgy.
Clear and lucid tutorial for adding Webmention to one’s Eleventy-based static site.

❤️ staeiou tweet: GitHub pages template supporting CV-style content for academics

Liked a tweet by Stuart GeigerStuart Geiger (Twitter)
More academics should definitely try this out! For those who might need help or support, check in with the community via chat or find resources at https://indieweb.org/Indieweb_for_Education
#academicsamizdat

👓 Adding Webmentions to Jekyll | Jordan Merrick

Read Adding Webmentions to Jekyll by Jordan MerrickJordan Merrick (jordanmerrick.com)
I've added some basic support for webmentions to my Jekyll-powered site using webmention.io and this Jekyll plugin. If any of my posts are mentioned elsewhere and my site receives a webmention, it's displayed below the post content. Since Jekyll is a static site generator, the plugin can only check ...

Getting data out of Medium

Read Getting data out of Medium by Kris Shaffer (pushpullfork.com)

Controlling my data is important to me. It’s also important that my students (and the faculty that I support) have the ability to control their own data, as well. That doesn’t mean that everything needs to live on a Domain of One’s Own. But it does mean that I want my data to be as flexible as possible, and as easy to move around as possible.

It’s really easy to download an archive of your Medium posts. Like your Twitter archive, you can just unzip the archive and upload it to your domain, and you’ve got it up and running.

However, if you want to incorporate those posts into a different platform — like WordPress, Jekyll, Known, etc. — it is more of a challenge.

I wrote my posts on the Medium API directly in Medium. Partly as an experiment, and partly because I love the Medium post editor. (It’s why I incorporated a Medium editor clone into Peasy.) But after writing three posts —  complete with feature images, inline images, and code blocks — in Medium, I decided to import them into my Jekyll/GitHub Pages site. That’s turned out to be a challenge. Not an insurmountable one, but one that I’d rather avoid going through.

I downloaded my Medium archive, used Pandoc to convert the posts from HTML to MarkDown, and then copied and pasted the MarkDown into new posts on my Jekyll site. There was more post-processing than I anticipated, or would like. And it doesn’t look as easy to automate the cleanup as I would like.

Even more frustrating was my discovery a couple weeks ago that the Medium API supports posting to Medium, but not retrieving posts from Medium. It is easy to write code that cross-posts from another platform to Medium, but Medium makes it more difficult to go the other way.

Why?

My guess is that their focus is on content. They want to be the place where we go to find ALL THE CONTENT. So they make it really easy to get content in. Harder to get content out. And by making a beautiful, easy-to-use editor, the temptation is strong to just use Medium from the start.

If we just want to write, get our writings read, and have a permanent record of what we wrote. Medium can be great. But if we want to write content that we keep coming back to, content that keeps evolving, content that’s part of a long-term project … and if we don’t want that long-term project to be locked into a single platform … then Medium may be a problem.

I say as I write this post on Medium.

Because I just can’t resist this editor.

Time to go add some code to Peasy so I can get it ready for prime-time sooner.

Featured image by paul bica (CC BY).

A prescient article written last fall before the news that Medium was downsizing significantly this week.