Chris Aldrich is reading “Decentralisation considered harmful”

Read Decentralisation considered harmful by Amy Guy (rhiaro.co.uk)
How are the decentralised technologies we're working on going to make people more vulnerable?

Chris Aldrich is reading “Trump’s Breezy Calls to World Leaders Leave Diplomats Aghast”

Read Trump’s Breezy Calls to World Leaders Leave Diplomats Aghast (nytimes.com)
The president-elect’s unfiltered exchanges prompted the White House to urge him to seek the State Department’s expertise in his encounters with foreign leaders.

Chris Aldrich is reading “Trump and Carrier: How a Modern Economy Is Like a Parking Garage”

Read Trump and Carrier: How a Modern Economy Is Like a Parking Garage (nytimes.com)
It’s a constant state of flux, with jobs being created or lost. The challenge is to have a business climate in which you have more of the former.

Chris Aldrich is reading “Twitter has a new head of product who barely uses the product”

Read Twitter has a new head of product who barely uses the product (theverge.com)
Twitter’s ceaseless search for someone to tell the social network where to go and how to get there has come to a momentary pause. The company announced today, on Twitter of course, that it has hired startup founder Keith Coleman as vice president of product. Coleman, according to his Twitter bio, is the CEO of Yes Inc., a relatively unknown Bay Area startup responsible for two social apps called Frenzy and WZD. Frenzy offers a way to make quick plans with friends, while WZD is a blend Facebook and Snapchat that lets you share what you’re doing with friends by posting photos and videos layered with emoji and text. Because Yes is joining Twitter alongside Coleman, both apps are being shut down, according to a note posted to Yes’ website. Prior to Yes, Coleman was a product lead at Google overseeing services like Gmail and its chat companion.

Chris Aldrich is reading “A Yale history professor’s powerful, 20-point guide to defending democracy under a Trump presidency”

Read A Yale history professor’s powerful, 20-point guide to defending democracy under a Trump presidency by Timothy Snyder (facebook.com)
Americans are no wiser than the Europeans who saw democracy yield to fascism, Nazism, or communism. Our one advantage is that we might learn from their experience. Now is a good time to do so. Here are twenty lessons from the twentieth century, adapted to the circumstances of today.

Chris Aldrich is reading “Donald Trump speaks with Taiwan’s president—a massive diplomatic reversal that will enrage China”

Read Donald Trump speaks with Taiwan's president—a massive diplomatic reversal that will enrage China (Quartz)
Trump is also interested in opening a hotel there.

Chris Aldrich is reading “A guide to writing recommendation letters that aren’t sexist”

Read A guide to writing recommendation letters that aren't sexist (Quartz)
Sexism in the workplace starts long before the job has even begun.

Chris Aldrich is reading “Do You Want to be Described as Hard Working?”

Read Do You Want to be Described as Hard Working? by Athene Donald (Athene Donald's Blog)
I visited Oxford this week to talk to the Women in Physics group, mainly made up of students and postdocs (not all of whom were women). Tea and excellent scones

Chris Aldrich is reading “Dwight D. Eisenhower: Address ‘The Chance for Peace’ Delivered Before the American Society of Newspaper Editors. April 16, 1953”

Read Dwight D. Eisenhower: Address "The Chance for Peace" Delivered Before the American Society of Newspaper Editors (presidency.ucsb.edu)
Every gun that is made, every warship launched, every rocket fired signifies, in the final sense, a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed. This world in arms is not spending money alone. It is spending the sweat of its laborers, the genius of its scientists, the hopes of its children.

Chris Aldrich is reading “My 2017-01-01 #IndieWeb Commitment: Own All My RSVPs To Public Events” by Tantek Çelik

Read My 2017-01-01 Commitment: Own All My RSVPs To Public Events by Tantek ÇelikTantek Çelik (tantek.com)
My commitment for 2017 is to always, 100% of the time, post RSVPs to public events on my own site first, and only secondarily (manually if I must) RSVP to silo (social media) event URLs. What’s your 2017-01-01 commitment?
I love the idea of making an IndieWeb resolution for the New Year. Time to put my thinking cap on and decide which of the 100s of itches it’s (they’re?) going to be?

Chris Aldrich is reading “AP Definitive Source | Writing about the ‘alt-right’”

Read AP Definitive Source | Writing about the "alt-right" (blog.ap.org)
Recent developments have put the so-called “alt-right” movement in the news. They highlight the need for clarity around use of the term and around some related terms, such as “white nationalism” and “white supremacism.”
Though they could certainly be abused, standards bodies like the Associated Press can be powerful forces for good in the world.

This piece also reminds me of a Joanne Jacobs quote I wrote about recently.

🔖 American Amnesia: How the War on Government Led Us to Forget What Made America Prosper by Jacob S. Hacker & Paul Pierson

Bookmarked American Amnesia: How the War on Government Led Us to Forget What Made America Prosper (Simon & Schuster, March 29, 2016)
From the groundbreaking author team behind the bestselling Winner-Take-All Politics, a timely and topical work that examines what’s good for American business and what’s good for Americans—and why those interests are misaligned.<br><br> In Winner-Take-All Politics, Jacob S. Hacker and Paul Pierson explained how political elites have enabled and propelled plutocracy. Now in American Amnesia, they trace the economic and political history of the United States over the last century and show how a viable mixed economy has long been the dominant engine of America’s prosperity.<br><br> Like every other prospering democracy, the United States developed a mixed economy that channeled the spirit of capitalism into strong growth and healthy social development. In this bargain, government and business were as much partners as rivals. Public investments in education, science, transportation, and technology laid the foundation for broadly based prosperity. Programs of economic security and progressive taxation provided a floor of protection and business focused on the pursuit of profit—and government addressed needs business could not.<br><br> The mixed economy was the most important social innovation of the twentieth century. It spread a previously unimaginable level of broad prosperity. It enabled steep increases in education, health, longevity, and economic security. And yet, extraordinarily, it is anathema to many current economic and political elites. And as the advocates of anti-government free market fundamentalist have gained power, they are hell-bent on scrapping the instrument of nearly a century of unprecedented economic and social progress. In American Amnesia, Hacker and Pierson explain how—and why they must be stopped.
Earlier tonight I watched a segment on The PBS NewsHour about infrastructure in America that featured this book which came out earlier this year.