👓 I went on a date with Aziz Ansari. It turned into the worst night of my life | Babe.net

I went on a date with Aziz Ansari. It turned into the worst night of my life by Katie Way (babe)
Exclusive -- A young photographer told the comedian: ‘I want to make sure you're aware so maybe the next girl doesn't have to cry on the ride home’

Reading as follow up to the provocative article I read in The Atlantic yesterday. I’m a bit more interested in the cultural differences brought up by The Atlantic author and the millennial viewpoint in this article.

I’m often struck with people’s seeming lack of ability to communicate verbally, and this seems even more apparent with the millennial generations. Also striking is “Grace’s” even more dramatic reaction to the encounter after she’d had time to discuss it more with friends. It almost reads as if she didn’t know what to think of things by herself without the filter of her friends’ comments and thoughts. I’m curious if this phenomenon is generational and what role the texting/sharing/social media environment of the past decade has or hasn’t done to impact this viewpoint.

Some thoughts about the journalistic perspective

I spent a few minutes looking into babe as a source and I’m even more curious how to take the story given the photo I found at the bottom of their article and the text from their “about page” which is given the permalink path “/manifesto”. Their top menu rail includes the topics: “news, lust, fads, looks, IRL, pop” which makes me even more suspicious.

Given these and their apparent size and exuberant youth and lack of experience, I have to wonder about their journalistic integrity a bit. While they did seemingly go to some lengths to verify Grace’s story with friends and back it up with apparent photos and texts, it almost plays as journalistic theater copying work and stories they’ve likely recently read out of The Washington Post and The New York Times. How does such a small publication get a story and choose to push it right after the Golden Globes in such a way? Are the editors or writer friends with the subject or even the subject herself? If so this should be mentioned for full disclosure in the article. Especially in the case where they may be trying to press such an article into the mainstream and thereby have some significant exposure and financial upside for themselves.

Page header on babe’s “manifesto” and found at the bottom of the story.

We publish our own voices, uncensored and unfiltered
babe started in May 2016 as an experiment by a group of editors in our early twenties. We now reach more than 3 million readers a month, and a million girls follow us on Facebook. And because we aren’t owned by a magazine empire which needs cover stars, we can say what we like.

We know our readers like we know our friends. On babe we put out the kind of media we want to read – stories and videos and memes that are as spontaneous and savage as what goes down our group chats. And then on Fridays we get drunk together.

babe is into good news reporting, trash trends, personal stories, industry-leading analysis of fuckboys and the pettiest celebrity drama.

And we’re cool with admitting that we are full of contradictions, because all girls are. We care about safe sex and access to birth control, but know sometimes you just need to pop some Plan B. Find us in the gap between our image of ourselves and how we actually behave.

Hang with us here, read our top stories here, tell us where we’ve fucked up here.

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👓 The Humiliation of Aziz Ansari | The Atlantic

The Humiliation of Aziz Ansari by Caitlin Flanagan (The Atlantic)
Allegations against the comedian are proof that women are angry, temporarily powerful—and very, very dangerous.

I love that the author discusses her personal background and cultural viewpoint here. It’s certainly an interesting perspective on the #MeToo movement in the past six months. I’m quite curious to read the underlying source article. Until now I’ve not heard of babe as a source at all.

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📖 Read pages 95-110 of Ramona the Pest by Beverly Cleary

📖 Read pages 95-110, Chapter 6: The Baddest Witch in the World, of Ramona the Pest by Beverly Cleary (Scholastic Book Services, , ISBN: 0-590-04493-1)

I’m skipping around a bit in the plot since it’s not entirely linear…

I really appreciate the sophisticated philosophy of a kindergartner loosing her identity by wearing a mask. This idea was certainly something I find intriguing.

I’m pretty sure I read this book in my youth, but I’m finding that I honestly don’t recall any of the plot for some reason.

According to Pocket, I’m still in their top 5% of their readers/users despite the fact that I cut way back on using it this past year in strong deference to using other feed readers including one built into my website.

Apparently I read 678, 617 words in their app this year which according to them is the equivalent of reading 14 books. To ballpark things I think I read 5 times as much in other apps. Now I don’t feel quite as bad about my poor Goodreads numbers.

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📗 Read pages i-14 of The Theoretical Minimum: What You Need to Know to Start Doing Physics by Leonard Susskind and George Hrabovsky

📖 Read pages i-14 of The Theoretical Minimum: What You Need to Know to Start Doing Physics by Leonard Susskind and George Hrabovsky (Basic Books, , ISBN: 978-0465028115)

I’d read a portion of this in the past, but thought I’d circle back to it when I saw it sitting on the shelf at the library before the holidays. It naturally helps to have had lots of physics in the past, but this has a phenomenally clear and crisp presentation of just the basics in a way that is seldom if ever seen in actual physics textbooks.

Highlights, Quotes, & Marginalia

Lecture One: The Nature of Classical Physics

There is a very simple rule to tell when a diagram represents a deterministic reversible law. If every state has a single unique arrow leading into it, and a single arrow leading out of it, then it is a legal deterministic reversible law.

Highlight (yellow) – 1. The Nature of Classical Physics > Page 9

There’s naturally a much more sophisticated and subtle mathematical way of saying this. I feel like I’ve been constantly tempted to go back and look at more category theory, and this may be yet another motivator.
Added on Wednesday, January 4, 2018 late evening

The rule that dynamical laws must be deterministic and reversible is so central to classical physics that we sometimes forget to mention it when teaching the subject. […] minus-first law [: …] undoubtedly the most fundamental of all physics laws–the conservation of information. The conservation of information is simply the rule that every state has one arrow in and one arrow out. It ensures that you never lose track of where you started.

Highlight (yellow) – 1. The Nature of Classical Physics > Page 9-10

This is very simply and naturally stated, but holds a lot of complexity. Again I’d like to come back and do some serious formalization of this and reframe it in a category theory frameork.
Added on Wednesday, January 4, 2018 late evening

There is evan a zeroth law […]

Highlight (gray) – 1. The Nature of Classical Physics > Page 9

spelling should be even; I’m also noticing a lot of subtle typesetting issues within the physical production of the book that are driving me a bit crazy. Spaces where they don’t belong or text not having clear margins at the tops/bottoms of pages. I suspect the math and layout of diagrams and boxes in the text caused a lot of problems in their usual production flow.
Added on Wednesday, January 4, 2018 late evening

Guide to highlight colors

Yellow–general highlights and highlights which don’t fit under another category below
Orange–Vocabulary word; interesting and/or rare word
Green–Reference to read
Blue–Interesting Quote
Gray–Typography Problem
Red–Example to work through

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I want to read 42 books in 2018.

I sometimes feel guilty about failing miserably at these based on the way GoodReads counts their books vis-a-vis finishing complete books, particularly when I’m often reading such dense technical books in which reading a page a day is a near Herculean task.

Thus, because I can have finer control of things on my own website, I’ll try to break things out on a more granular level.

I want to read (aka work my way through) 2-3 technical textbooks in 2018.
I want to read 10 non-fiction books in 2018.
I want to read 20 fiction books in 2018.
I want to read 10 juvenal fiction/literature books in 2018.

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👓 Limits and Colimits, Part 1 (Introduction) | Math3ma

Limits and Colimits, Part 1 (Introduction) by Tai-Danae BradleyTai-Danae Bradley (Math3ma)
I'd like to embark on yet another mini-series here on the blog. The topic this time? Limits and colimits in category theory! But even if you're not familiar with category theory, I do hope you'll keep reading. Today's post is just an informal, non-technical introduction. And regardless of your categorical background, you've certainly come across many examples of limits and colimits, perhaps without knowing it! They appear everywhere - in topology, set theory, group theory, ring theory, linear algebra, differential geometry, number theory, algebraic geometry. The list goes on. But before diving in, I'd like to start off by answering a few basic questions.

A great little introduction to category theory! Can’t wait to see what the future installments bring.

Interestingly I came across this on Instagram. It may be one of the first times I’ve seen math at this level explained in pictorial form via Instagram.

Given a bunch of sets, what are some ways to construct a new set? Some options include: intersections, unions, Cartesian products, preimages, and quotients. And these are all examples of “limits and colimits” in #categorytheory! Notice how the examples come in two flavors? An intersection, a preimage, a product are all formed by picking out a sub-collection of elements from given sets, contingent on some condition. These are examples of limits. On the other hand, unions and quotients are formed by assembling or 'gluing' things together. These are examples of colimits. . In practice, limits tend to have a "sub-thing" feel to them, whereas colimits tend to have a "glue-y" feel to them. And these constructions are two of the most frequent ways that mathematicians build things, so they appear ALL over mathematics. But what are (co)limits, exactly? I’ve just posted a non-technical introduction on my blog. It’s Part 1 of the latest mini-series on Math3ma. Link in profile!

A post shared by Tai-Danae Bradley (@math3ma) on

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📖 Read pages 47-59 of Ramona the Pest by Beverly Cleary

📖 Read pages 47-59, Chapter 3: Seat Work, of Ramona the Pest by Beverly Cleary (Scholastic Book Services, , ISBN: 0-590-04493-1)

Ramon scribbles some black on the picture of her house to make it “interesting”. I knew immediately it was a fire and couldn’t help but laughing at the pending discussion… Oh, the creativity of the young!

📖 Read pages 29-46 of Ramona the Pest by Beverly Cleary

📖 Read pages 29-46, Chapter 2: Show and Tell, of Ramona the Pest by Beverly Cleary (Scholastic Book Services, , ISBN: 0-590-04493-1)

A doll named Chevrolet is just awesome. Even better that her hair is in horrific shape because “It’s sort of green because I gave her a blue rinse.” Then it was washed with “Lots of things,” […] “Soap, shampoo, detergent, bubble bath. I tried Dutch Cleanser once, but it didn’t work.”

👓 The #2018Liberation List | Cate Huston – Medium

The #2018Liberation List by Cate Huston (Medium)
I hate New Year’s resolutions. Not because I don’t believe in goals, or working on myself, or the new year as a time to reflect and adjust… but because I’m tired of focusing on the ways that I am inadequate and need to do better. I hate seeing my friends worry about what they need to do better — especially right now, when the world is selling so many of us short. So for 2018 I made a different list, and I asked a bunch of friends to do the same. This is the list of things I’m freeing myself from in 2018. My #2018Liberation list. Join us? I want to read yours, too.

The originating post for this concept.

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👓 The #2018Liberation List | Ellen K. Pao – Medium

The #2018Liberation List by Ellen K. Pao (Medium)
Yesterday morning I tweeted about letting go in 2018. Then Cate Huston and Jean Hsu told me about this project on 2018 liberation. And I agreed to join and wrote this post. It’s less well-formulated than I’d like, but it’s really how I’m feeling and thinking about all the things I want to let go of in 2018.

I’ve now read a few of these lists and it’s interesting how seemingly insecure so many people, many of which I look up to, are often in spite of their tremendous influence and success.

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👓 2018 New Year’s Liberations | Jean Hsu – Medium

2018 New Year’s Liberations by Jean Hsu (Medium)
Thanks to Cate Huston for starting us off with her New Year’s Liberations. We need to be explicit about what we say no to, to make time and room and mental energy for what it is we want.
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👓 My #2018Liberations | Ben Werdmuller – Medium

My #2018Liberations by Ben Werdmuller (Medium)
In lieu of resolutions this year, Cate Huston wrote a set of liberations, starting a movement. My friend Jean Hsu also wrote a liberating, personal list, which is where I discovered it, and Ellen K. Pao has a characteristically thoughtful entry. I like the framing a lot: rather than creating a set of requirements for my new year, which is what a resolution does, I’m freeing myself from a set. So here’s my list of things I’m liberating myself from in 2018:

 

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