Read - Want to Read: Red Comet: The Short Life and Blazing Art of Sylvia Plath by Heather Clark (Knopf Publishing Group)

"Finally, the biography that Sylvia Plath deserves . . . A spectacular achievement." --Ruth Franklin, author of Shirley Jackson: A Rather Haunted Life

The highly anticipated new biography of Sylvia Plath that focuses on her remarkable literary and intellectual achievements, while restoring the woman behind the long-held myths about her life and art. With a wealth of never-before-accessed materials--including unpublished letters and manuscripts; court, police, and psychiatric records; and new interviews--Heather Clark brings to life the brilliant daughter of Wellesley, Massachusetts who had poetic ambition from a very young age and was an accomplished, published writer of poems and stories even before she became a star English student at Smith College in the early 1950s. Determined not to read Plath's work as if her every act, from childhood on, was a harbinger of her tragic fate, Clark evokes a culture in transition, in the shadow of the atom bomb and the Holocaust, as she explores Plath's world: her early relationships and determination not to become a conventional woman and wife; her conflicted ties to her well-meaning, widowed mother; her troubles at the hands of an unenlightened mental-health industry; her Cambridge years and thunderclap meeting with Ted Hughes, a marriage of true minds that would change the course of poetry in English; and much more.

Clark's clear-eyed portraits of Hughes, his lover Assia Wevill, and other demonized players in the arena of Plath's suicide promotes a deeper understanding of her final days, with their outpouring of first-rate poems. Along with illuminating readings of the poems themselves, Clark's meticulous, compassionate research brings us closer than ever to the spirited woman and visionary artist who blazed a trail that still lights the way for women poets the world over.

Greg O’Dea in “@themeghanodea @rachsyme The latest, by @Plathbiography Heather Clark, is far and away the best Plath biography. It is also a model for all biographies in its critical balance and deep erudition. Even at about 900 pages it reads like a literary dream.” / Twitter ()

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Some threads with great biography recommendations

Read The Problem With a 50–50 Senate (The Atlantic)
A double victory in Georgia could create serious difficulties for Democrats—and might even make it less likely for Biden to win reelection.

This is a serious issue, particularly if the Democrats can’t manage to make any headway into fixing the Electoral College or gerrymandering.

Read Трудности перевода by Евгений КузнецовЕвгений Кузнецов (DIMV)
На днях с подачи  toby3d в индивебной телегруппе появились призывы попереводить IndieWeb Wiki на великий и могучий. Мне эта мысль понравилась ещё в прошлом году, когда  Тим...
Read Cunningham's Law (meta.m.wikimedia.org)
Cunningham's Law states "the best way to get the right answer on the internet is not to ask a question; it's to post the wrong answer."

This feels very true to my experiences. Perhaps I ought to use it more, but there’s a sort of cruelty if you’re doing it on purpose. Definitely a pattern used by pundits (unwittingly?) in an attempt to be controversial and therefore as clickbait.

Read Can someone add some more HTML tags, please? by Dries BuytaertDries Buytaert (dri.es)
Every day, millions of new web pages are added to the internet. Most of them are unstructured, uncategorized, and nearly impossible for software to understand. It irks me. Look no further than Sir Tim Berners-Lee's Wikipedia page: The markup for Tim Berners-Lee's Wikipedia page; it's complex and inc...

We definitely need more rich mark up that’s parseable and usable. I’m not sure that additional HTML tags would necessarily be taken up heavily to be of much use.

I do like having some solid microformats on my own content and it works out well with many of the parsing tools that I use regularly for consuming content. I’m curious what Dries has tried out in terms of options he’s dogfooded into Drupal? I do notice that when my website parses his article, it does pull in more data than most sites I come across. The one thing my parser didn’t find was his avatar in the “correct” place. It popped up as a page photo rather than an avatar for him as an author.

Putting microformats into Wikipedia seems like an interesting idea. Anyone want to manually add microformats to tbl’s Wikipedia page? 🙂