👓 A Domain of One’s Own in a Post-Ownership Society | Hack Education

Read A Domain of One's Own in a Post-Ownership Society by Audrey Watters (Hack Education)
The University of Mary Washington’s initiative, “Domain of One’s Own,” is phrased thusly as a nod to Virginia Woolf’s essay “A Room of One’s Own,” in which she famously quipped that “A woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction.” We can critique – and certainly we should – the class implications and expectations in Woolf’s commandment here; and we must consider both the financial burden and the transaction mechanism of a push for domains in education – as Maha notes, for example, many students in Egypt don’t have a credit card with which to make online purchases. “Give her a room of her own and five hundred a year, let her speak her mind and leave out half that she now puts in, and she will write a better book one of these days,” Woolf wrote in 1929. (That 500 quid is the equivalent to about $37,000 when adjusted for inflation.) But Woolf is not simply talking about having a piece of paper – a title, for example – that decrees she owns the room. It’s about having the financial freedom and a personal space to write. To own is to possess. To own is to have authority and control. To own is to acknowledge. It implies a responsibility. Ownership is a legal designation; but it’s something more than that too. It’s something more and then, without legal protection, the word also means something less.

There is some important internet philosophy going on in this article. Though written for an education-based audience, I think it’s got an important message for everyone about owning their own space online and being able to write and freely express themselves.

👓 John Heard, the Frazzled Father in ‘Home Alone,’ Dies at 71 | New York Times

Read John Heard, the Frazzled Father in ‘Home Alone,’ Dies at 71 by Annie Correal (New York Times)
Mr. Heard played pained characters in dramas but was best known as the dad who embarked on a family trip to Paris without his youngest son.

The family is actually quoted as saying he wanted to be known for his other work rather than for Home Alone, yet the New York Times choose to dishonor him anyway. It’s so sad as he was a really solid character actor with a great body of work. I’m hoping that his obit will get more people to go back and dig up Cutter’s Way.

I recall thinking about him fondly a month ago as I watched The Pelican Brief, but may remember him best for his frustrating turn in Big as well as a bevvy of great guest roles on television.

👓 In tweet storm, Trump decries ‘illegal leaks’ and asserts ‘all agree’ he has complete power to pardon | Washington Post

Read In tweet storm, Trump decries ‘illegal leaks’ and asserts ‘all agree’ he has complete power to pardon (Washington Post)
The president said a Post report of Attorney General Jeff Sessions's discussions with the Russian ambassador was based on leaks that “must stop.”

I suspect there would be a revolution if Trump pulled out pardons for family or campaign aides much less himself.

👓 Kaisa Matomäki Dreams of Primes | Quanta Magazine

Read Kaisa Matomäki Dreams of Primes by Kevin Hartnett (Quanta Magazine)
Kaisa Matomäki has proved that properties of prime numbers over long intervals hold over short intervals as well. The techniques she uses have transformed the study of these elusive numbers.

👓 In Game Theory, No Clear Path to Equilibrium | Quanta Magazine

Read In Game Theory, No Clear Path to Equilibrium by Erica Klarreich (Quanta Magazine)
John Nash’s notion of equilibrium is ubiquitous in economic theory, but a new study shows that it is often impossible to reach efficiently.

There’s a couple of interesting sounding papers in here that I want to dig up and read. There are some great results that sound like they are crying out for better generalization and classification. Perhaps some overlap with information theory and complexity?

To some extent I also find myself wondering about repeated play as a possible random walk versus larger “jumps” in potential game play and the effects this may have on the “evolution” of a solution by play instead of a simpler closed mathematical solution.

👓 Why Are Coding Bootcamps Going Out of Business? | Hack Education

Read Why Are Coding Bootcamps Going Out of Business? by Audrey Watters
Within the past week, two well-known and well-established coding bootcamps have announced they’ll be closing their doors: Dev Bootcamp, owned by Kaplan Inc., and The Iron Yard, owned by the Apollo Education Group (parent company of the University of Phoenix). Two closures might not make a trend… yet. But some industry observers have suggested we might see more “consolidation” in the coming months.

Some great observations on non-profit vs. for-profit educational institutions and the social inequality that exists between the two.

👓 USC moves to fire, ban from campus former medical school dean over ‘egregious behavior’ | LA Times

Read USC moves to fire, ban from campus former medical school dean over 'egregious behavior' (LA Times)
Former U.S. Attorney will investigate drug allegations involving former USC medical school dean

👓 Petition to Re-License React has been Escalated to Facebook’s Engineering Directors | WP Tavern

Read Petition to Re-License React has been Escalated to Facebook’s Engineering Directors by Sarah Gooding (WP Tavern)
React users are petitioning Facebook to re-license React.js after the Apache Software Foundation announced its decision to ban Apache PMC members from using any technology licensed with Facebook’s BSD+Patents License. So far the GitHub issue has received 627 “thumbs up” emoji and 66 comments from concerned React users who are hoping for a change in licensing. Many respondents on the thread said that ASF’s decision affects their organizations’ ability to continue using React in projects. “Apache CouchDB and others will switch away from React if we have to,” CouchDB committer Robert Newson said. “We’d rather not, it’s a lot of work for no real gain, but we don’t have a choice. Changing license can be simple (RocksDB completed that change in a day).”

👓 Why Is Anthony Scaramucci Following Me on Twitter? | The Atlantic

Read Why Is Anthony Scaramucci Following Me on Twitter? by Adrienne Lafrance (The Atlantic)
Yes, this is probably a Taye Diggs situation.

👓 Anthony Scaramucci Loved Hillary, Gave to Obama, and Deleted Anti-Trump Tweets | Daily Beast

Read Anthony Scaramucci Loved Hillary, Gave to Obama, and Deleted Anti-Trump Tweets (The Daily Beast)
The new White House communications director didn’t always like his boss and started deleting tweets within hours of getting the gig.

👓 Sessions discussed Trump campaign-related matters with Russian ambassador, U.S. intelligence intercepts show | Washington Post

Read Sessions discussed Trump campaign-related matters with Russian ambassador, U.S. intelligence intercepts show (Washington Post)
The accounts from Sergey Kislyak to his superiors, intercepted by U.S. spy agencies, contradict public assertions by the attorney general.

👓 Google to radically change homepage for first time since 1996 | The Guardian

Read Google to radically change homepage for first time since 1996 by Samuel Gibbs (the Guardian)
Search company to integrate its app-based feed of news, events, sports and interest-based topics into Google.com page in the near future

👓 Another tenure-track scientist bites the dust | Science

Read Another tenure-track scientist bites the dust by Adam Ruben (Science)
Matthew knew the deal when he joined his department: 10 years of work, and then you have to apply for tenure. “But,” he told me, “nobody talks about, ‘What if I run out of money beforehand?’”

We’ve really got to reorganize how research is done in this country. The brain drain is destroying our tremendous lead in basic research.

👓 An SNL writer is replying to Trump’s tweets like they’re texts | CNN

Read An SNL writer is replying to Trump's tweets like they're texts (CNN)
Patten has offered travel tips, Netflix recommendations and a typical "text if you need anything." He gives a world leader the same kind of vaguely interested messages that you'd quickly send to appease your parents.

Not tremendously hilarious, but worth a good little laugh.

👓 See Just How Much Of A City’s Land Is Used For Parking Spaces

Read See Just How Much Of A City’s Land Is Used For Parking Spaces by Adele Peters (Fast Company)
In Los Angeles, for example, car parking takes up 17,020,594 square meters of land.

A great piece on urban and city planning which focuses on parking. I can only imagine how drastically different Los Angeles could look in just 20 years.

The website featured has some great visualizations and interactive features.

I guessed almost perfectly how much space Los Angeles delegates to cars, trains, and bicycles