👓 Pasadena Man Pleads Not Guilty to Stabbing Two Men, One to Death | Pasadena Now

Read Pasadena Man Pleads Not Guilty to Stabbing Two Men, One to Death (pasadenanow.com)
The stabbing attack occurred near a bar in the 2600 block of East Colorado Boulevard A 66-year-old Pasadena man pleaded not guilty Monday to murder and attempted murder charges stemming from a stabbing incident early in the morning of September 12 in the 2600 block of E. Colorado Blvd. Two men sustained stab wounds during the attack, according to reports from the Pasadena Police Department, and one of them, Jerry Chan, 42, died later. The other victim, Dan Trevino, 32, was treated for stab wounds in the leg and survived. The Los Angeles County District Attorney’s office said the suspect, Jose Antonio Santiago, pleaded not guilty to the charges during his arraignment Monday at the Pasadena Courthouse of the Los Angeles County Superior Court.

👓 Pasadena Bank Robber Known as “Luger Bandit” Sentenced to Prison | Pasadena Now

Read Pasadena Bank Robber Known as “Luger Bandit” Sentenced to Prison (pasadenanow.com)
A Pasadena man dubbed the “Luger Bandit” was sentenced Monday to 14 years in federal prison for a string of bank robberies in Southern California. Ramsin Jonathan Malek, 35, was also ordered by U.S. District Judge Stephen V. Wilson to pay $85,000 in restitution and serve five years of supervised release after he serves his time.

👓 Interim Police Chief to Tell City Committee Today Pasadena Experienced 3 Murders in Less Than 5 Weeks | Pasadena Now

Read Interim Police Chief to Tell City Committee Today Pasadena Experienced 3 Murders in Less Than 5 Weeks (pasadenanow.com)
Pasadena Interim Police Chief John Perez is scheduled to tell a City Committee today that three homicides that have occurred over the past month in Pasadena and that his Department has arrested the alleged killer in each case. Perez will present his Chief’s Monthly Report Wednesday before the City Council’s Public Safety Committee and is expected to include details about the homicides, all of which involved knife attacks between people who were familiar with each other.

👓 Pasadena Police Body Worn Camera Program Has Captured Over 311,759 Incidents, Committee Will Hear | Pasadena Now

Read Pasadena Police Body Worn Camera Program Has Captured Over 311,759 Incidents, Committee Will Hear (pasadenanow.com)
Public Safety Committee Chair Vice Mayor John Kennedy, City Manager Steve Mermell and Pasadena Chief of Police John Perez at a recent Committee meeting. The Public Safety Committee of the Pasadena City Council will receive interim Pasadena Police Chief John Perez’s Monthly Report, which details statistics on crime in the City over the past year and the steps the Pasadena Police Department is taking to reduce crime incidents.

👓 The Hobo Code: An Introduction to the Hieroglyphic Language of Early 1900s Train-Hoppers | Open Culture

Read The Hobo Code: An Introduction to the Hieroglyphic Language of Early 1900s Train-Hoppers (Open Culture)
Many of us now use the word hobo to refer to any homeless individual, but back in the America of the late 19th and early 20th century, to be a hobo meant something more.

👓 I’ve Been Reporting on MS-13 for a Year. Here Are the 5 Things Trump Gets Most Wrong. | ProPublica

Read I’ve Been Reporting on MS-13 for a Year. Here Are the 5 Things Trump Gets Most Wrong. (ProPublica)
The gang is not invading the country. They’re not posing as fake families. They’re not growing. To stop them, the government needs to understand them.

🎧 ‘The Daily’: Part 5 of ‘Charm City’: What’s Behind the Black Box? | New York Times

Listened to ‘The Daily’: Part 5 of ‘Charm City’: What’s Behind the Black Box? by Sabrina Tavernise from nytimes.com

The relatives of a Baltimore teenager think they know the name of the police officer who killed him. But when his mother finally sees the surveillance video of his death, a new story emerges.

Every day this week, we’ve brought you the story of Lavar Montray Douglas, known as Nook, who was fatally shot by a police officer in Baltimore in 2016. His family has been searching for answers ever since.

Part 5 is the conclusion of our series. We talk to Nook’s mother, Toby Douglas, about how grief has changed her. She tried joining a support group for mothers, many of whom now fight to stop gun violence. But her son had a gun, and he was shooting it.

Toby and her mother, Davetta Parker, think they know the name of the police officer who killed Nook. They’ve heard it around the streets. We visit him at his home in the suburbs, and he’s not at all who we expected.

Nook would have turned 20 in late May. We drive with Toby to tie balloons at his grave and to a stop sign at the corner of Windsor Avenue and North Warwick Avenue, where he was killed. She often goes there to feel close to Nook, sometimes sleeping in her car at the intersection.

One day, Toby gets a phone call. It’s the police. They want to show her the complete surveillance video of Nook’s final moments.

If you’d like to start from the beginning, here are Part 1Part 2Part 3 and Part 4.

🎧 The Daily: “Charm City,” Part 3: The Lure of the Streets | New York Times

Listened to ‘The Daily’: Part 3 of ‘Charm City’: The Lure of the Streets by Sabrina Tavernise from nytimes.com

What happened to the generation caught between a crack epidemic that consumed their neighborhoods and the aggressive police tactics meant to fix the problem?

Nook spent the first few years of his life in an affluent suburb. But when he returned to Baltimore, he became part of a young generation caught between the crack epidemic and the aggressive police tactics meant to fix the problem.

For the past two days, we’ve been bringing you the story of the life and death of Lavar Montray Douglas, known as Nook. He was 18 years old when he was shot dead by a police officer in Baltimore in 2016.

In Part 3, we look at Nook’s childhood. He spent the first few years of his life with an aunt in an upper-middle-class home outside Baltimore, taking piano lessons and going to church every week. Yesterday, we learned that Nook’s mother, Toby Douglas, kept returning to Baltimore. The same thing happened to Nook.

We go to Nook’s Baltimore, to his corner on Calhoun Street and Pratt Street. Some of his friends are still there, and we talk to them about Nook’s life. He was ambitious, they say. A leader. His mother was proud of that.

Everybody was talking about the Baltimore police officers who had just been on trial, accused of stealing from drug dealers. You see, they said, we were right. The cops are robbers. We said this all along, but nobody believed us.

Suddenly, two police officers pull up, and we encounter something that seems to be emblematic of the changes in the Baltimore Police Department.

If you’d like to start from the beginning, here are Part 1 and Part 2.

🎧 Police Videos: Cincinnati, March 23, 2017 | Embedded (NPR)

Listened to Police Videos: Cincinnati, March 23, 2017 from Embedded | NPR
On April 16, 2015, police officer Jesse Kidder encountered a murder suspect named Michael Wilcox in a suburb outside of Cincinnati, Ohio. What happened next was caught on video and surprised a lot of people, including police. And the incident tells us a lot about how these videos have changed us. Follow us on Twitter @nprembedded, follow Kelly McEvers @kellymcevers, and producer Tom Dreisbach @TomDreisbach. Email us at embedded@npr.org

An interesting piece with some pressing questions. Though they set the race issue aside (and cleverly try to hide it at the beginning), I wonder what drastically different training might produce in these situations?

🎧 Criminal, Episode 61: Vanish (2/17/17)

Listened to Vanish, episode 61 (2/17/17) by Phoebe Judge from Criminal
People have faked death to escape criminal convictions, debts, and their spouses. In 2007, a man named Amir Vehabovic faked his death just to see who showed up at the funeral (answer: only his mom). It’s an appealing soap-opera fantasy, but actually disappearing requires an incredible amount of planning. How do you obtain a death certificate, a believable new identity, or enough money to start a new life? Today — the answers to those questions, stories of fake death gone wrong, and a man who spends his life bringing back the dead.

Brings up a lot of interesting “what if” questions. I’ll bet that if web browsers opened up some of their data, the data exhaust one spews on a daily basis could be easily used to track one down.

The minimum age of criminal responsibility continues to divide opinion | The Economist

Read The minimum age of criminal responsibility continues to divide opinion by The Data Team (The Economist)

A proposal to let Philippine criminal courts try nine-year-olds has drawn sharp criticism. But in 35 American states, children of any age can be convicted and sentenced

COMMON law has long held that committing a crime requires both a prohibited act and a “mens rea”, or “guilty mind”—the criminal knowing that the act was wrong. There is no global consensus regarding the youngest age at which a child can be deemed to have such intent, and thus can be tried and convicted of a criminal offence. Ten years ago the United Nations Committee on the Rights of the Child recommended an “absolute minimum” age of 12 for criminal responsibility, and urged countries “to continue to increase it to a higher age level”. The Philippines appears poised to move in the opposite direction: lawmakers there have proposed reducing the cut-off from 15 years old to nine. The bill has prompted sharp criticism both at home and abroad, and legislators are still arguing over its text.

Not long ago the Philippines earned a reputation for a relatively progressive stance on this issue. It introduced its current minimum age of criminal responsibility (MACR) in 2006, making it one of just 19 countries whose MACR is 15 or older. However, Rodrigo Duterte, the president, has adopted a harsh “tough-on-crime” agenda. The bill’s supporters say it would stop adult criminals from recruiting children under the age of criminal responsibility for drug-trafficking. Human-rights advocates counter that there is no evidence that this would reduce crime. Instead, says Leo Ratledge of Child Rights International Network, a British charity, it would punish victims of exploitation rather than those who exploit them.

The other members of the MACR-above-14 club are an incongruous bunch. Predictably, they include places like Norway and Sweden, which take a generally liberal approach to criminal justice. However, the top of the table is occupied by less developed countries that happen to have revised their juvenile-justice laws in recent years: in Timor-Leste and Mozambique, the MACR is now 16. Although most European states sit comfortably above the UN recommendation, there are notable exceptions. Scotland can hand out criminal records to eight-year-olds, though legislation is being mooted that will raise the minimum age limit to 12. In the rest of Britain, ten-year-olds can be tried for a crime. This British colonial legacy is reflected in the relatively low MACRs seen in South Africa, Australia and New Zealand. Similarly, Nigeria, India, Pakistan and Bangladesh are among the 21 countries that set a MACR of seven, the lowest national age globally.

In some cases the law is not clear-cut. The MACR in Comoros is based on puberty. It can differ by sex (as in Iran) or type of offence (Malaysia), while Poland and France entrust the issue to judges’ discretion. Nonetheless, even a vague minimum of “puberty” provides more protection than simply having no MACR at all. Just a handful of countries have no national MACR. The most striking is the United States. Although America sets a threshold of 11 years old for federal offences, the overwhelming share of crimes are policed at the state level. And 35 out of the 50 states have not set a MACR, putting them in a club with Cuba, Malaysia (exclusively for terrorism) and Sudan (for drug offences).