👓 12 Things Everyone Should Understand About Tech | Anil Dash

Read 12 Things Everyone Should Understand About Tech by Anil Dash (Anil Dash)
Tech is more important than ever, deeply affecting culture, politics and society. Given all the time we spend with our gadgets and apps, it’s essential to understand the principles that determine how tech affects our lives.

One of the more important things I’ve read in the past month. This short article should be required reading for every lawmaker in the land (and everyone else for that matter). Thanks Anil!

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👓 Why Are Newspaper Websites So Horrible? | City Lab

Read Why Are Newspaper Websites So Horrible? by Andrew Zaleski (CityLab)
Blame Google, for a start.

Nothing great or new here. Also no real solutions, though knowing some of the history and the problems, does help suggest possible solutions.

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👓 Perspective | Trump lied to me about his wealth to get onto the Forbes 400. Here are the tapes. | Washington Post

Read Perspective | Trump lied to me about his wealth to get onto the Forbes 400. Here are the tapes. by Jonathan Greenberg (Washington Post)
Posing as ‘John Barron,’ he claimed he owned most of his father’s real estate empire.

A liar to create perceptions about himself for decades and decades…

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👓 Why I Love Link Blogging | BirchTree

Read Why I Love Link Blogging (BirchTree)
More often than not, I write articles for this site after reading something someone else wrote. I browse the web for articles and tweets that I find interesting, and the ones that make me think are very often the ones that inspire me to write something myself. This leads to a funny situation as a w...

How many levels deep could the link blogging on these posts go? Is it linkblogging all the way down?

For me, I’ll add it specifically to my linkblog of things I’ve read which is a subsection of my collected linkblog which also collects favorites, likes, bookmarks, and sites I’m following.

Incidentally, this seems to be another post about people who use their websites for thinking and writing, which I seem to be coming across many of lately. I ought to collect them all into a group and write a piece about them and the general phenomenon.

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👓 WebAuthn: A Developer’s Guide to What’s on the Horizon | Okta Developer

Read WebAuthn: A Developer's Guide to What's on the Horizon by Aaron Parecki (developer.okta.com)
WebAuthn (the Web Authentication API) allows browsers to make use of hardware authenticators such as the Yubikey or a mobile phone's biometrics like a thumbprint reader or facial recognition.

I’ve been interested to see Aaron’s opinion of this when I saw it come across my radar the other day. Glad to have a simple overview of it’s functionality now, particularly from someone who’s literally written the book on authentication.

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👓 Wrapping My Head Around Micro.blog and IndieWeb | Jason Sadler

Read Wrapping My Head Around Micro.blog and IndieWeb by Jason Sadler (sadlerjw.com)
After the Facebook / Cambridge Analytica catastrophe and recent Twitter news (and retraction) about support for 3rd party clients, I found myself wondering about Micro.blog again, after hearing about it on Kickstarter a little over a year ago. On the surface, it’s an indie Twitter-like app, in th...
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👓 Cathy Fisher on fixing Fb: Go back to your 2001 fan site | Kimberly Hirsh

Read Cathy Fisher on fixing Fb: Go back to your 2001 fan site by Kimberly HirshKimberly Hirsh (Kimberly Hirsh)
Cathy Fisher, a Business Professional on Twitter (Twitter) “My idea for fixing Facebook: shut down Facebook and everyone goes back to the weird niche fan site forum they were on in 2001, where they then form a really deep friendship with a teen who lives in Poland” This is basically what I’m ...
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👓 Sean Hannity Is Named as Client of Michael Cohen, Trump’s Lawyer | New York Times

Read Sean Hannity Is Named as Client of Michael Cohen, Trump’s Lawyer by Alan Feuer (nytimes.com)
Lawyers for Mr. Cohen, the president’s personal lawyer, had sought to keep Mr. Hannity’s identity a secret in a court challenge of an F.B.I. search of Mr. Cohen’s office.

 

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👓 What Makes a Vowel a Vowel and a Consonant a Consonant | Today I Found Out

Read What Makes a Vowel a Vowel and a Consonant a Consonant by Emily Upton
ou already know that vowels in the English alphabet are a, e, i, o, u, and sometimes y, while the rest of the letters are called consonants. But did you ever ask yourself why the letters were divided into two separate groups?
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👓 Privacy sentences to ponder | Marginal Revolution

Read Privacy sentences to ponder by Tyler Cowen (Marginal REVOLUTION)
The increasing difficulty in managing one’s online personal data leads to individuals feeling a loss of control. Additionally, repeated consumer data breaches have given people a sense of futility, ultimately making them weary of having to think about online privacy. This phenomenon is called “privacy fatigue.” Although privacy fatigue is prevalent and has been discussed by scholars, there is little empirical research on the phenomenon. A new study published in the journal Computers and Human Behavior aimed not only to conceptualize privacy fatigue but also to examine its role in online privacy behavior. Based on literature on burnout, we developed measurement items for privacy fatigue, which has two key dimensions —emotional exhaustion and cynicism. Data analyzed from a survey of 324 Internet users showed that privacy fatigue has a stronger impact on privacy behavior than privacy concerns do, although the latter is widely regarded as the dominant factor in explaining online privacy behavior.
Emphasis added by me.  That is by Hanbyl Choi, Jonghwa Park, and Yoonhyuk Jung, via Michelle Dawson.

Better control of online privacy is certainly something that the IndieWeb can help to remedy.

The past weeks have indicated that we really do need some regulations. It’s not just Facebook, but major, unpunished leaks from data brokers like Experian (which seemingly actually profited from it’s data leak) or even those of companies like Target. Many have been analogizing data as the “new oil”, but people shouldn’t be treated like dying sea birds trapped in oil slicks.

I’m bookmarking this journal article to read: The role of privacy fatigue in online privacy behavior. 1

References

1.
Choi H, Park J, Jung Y. The role of privacy fatigue in online privacy behavior. Comput Human Behav. 2018;81:42-51. doi:10.1016/j.chb.2017.12.001
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👓 Building a Text Editor for a Digital-First Newsroom | Times Open (Medium)

Read Building a Text Editor for a Digital-First Newsroom by Sophia Ciocca (Times Open | Medium)
An inside look at the inner workings of a technology you may take for granted

A topic which is tremendously overlooked in the CMS world, but which can provide a lot of power.

h/t Jorge Spinoza

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👓 Climate Change Is Messing With Your Dinner | Bloomberg

Read Climate Change Is Messing With Your Dinner by Agnieszka de Sousa and Hayley Warren (Bloomberg.com)
The future of food looks like lots of lobsters, Polish chardonnay and California coffee.

This is a difficult story to tell, though the timelapse imagery here is relatively useful. If one had some extra money lying around, it certainly indicates which crops one could be shorting in the markets over the next few decades.

I can imagine Jeremy Cherfas doing something interesting and more personalizing with this type of story via his fantastic interviews on Eat This Podcast.

h/t Jorge Spinoza

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👓 Mathematicians Explore Mirror Link Between Two Geometric Worlds | Quanta Magazine

Read Mathematicians Explore Mirror Link Between Two Geometric Worlds by Kevin Hartnett (Quanta Magazine)
Decades after physicists happened upon a stunning mathematical coincidence, researchers are getting close to understanding the link between two seemingly unrelated geometric universes.

An interesting story in that physicists found the connection first and mathematicians are tying the two areas together after the fact. More often it’s the case that mathematicians come up with the theory and then physicists are applying it to something. I’m not sure I like some of the naming conventions laid out, but it’ll be another decade or two after it’s all settled before things have more logical sounding names. I’m a bit curious if any category theorists are playing around in either of these areas.

After having spent the last couple of months working through some of the “rigidity” (not the best descriptor in the article as it shows some inherent bias in my opinion) of algebraic geometry, now I’m feeling like symplectic geometry could be fun.

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