👓 Do Things that Don’t Scale by Paul Graham

Do Things that Don't Scale by Paul Graham (paulgraham.com)
One of the most common types of advice we give at Y Combinator is to do things that don't scale. A lot of would-be founders believe that startups either take off or don't. You build something, make it available, and if you've made a better mousetrap, people beat a path to your door as promised. Or they don't, in which case the market must not exist. Actually startups take off because the founders make them take off. There may be a handful that just grew by themselves, but usually it takes some sort of push to get them going. A good metaphor would be the cranks that car engines had before they got electric starters. Once the engine was going, it would keep going, but there was a separate and laborious process to get it going.

This is a slightly older post, but still has some generally sound advice for start up companies.

As I read it, I can’t help but think about how the structure and set up of the IndieWeb community is mirrored in a lot of this advice. The fact that everyone is diligently selfdogfooding the ultimate product that we all love and are designing specifically for people gives me great hope that we’re all onto something that has great potential.

I’m curious how we can take the rest of the playbook and put it into action as well. This is certainly something I’ll have to come back and think about more in the near future.

Big portions of the article also skirt around the idea of tummeling without actually using the term. It such a useful concept, I’m surprised that it’s not more commonly known.

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The Bobby Bonilla Retirement Plan: Quit Baseball In 2001, Get Paid Until 2035

The Bobby Bonilla Retirement Plan: Quit Baseball In 2001, Get Paid Until 2035 (FiveThirtyEight)
Bobby Bonilla hasn’t played in a professional baseball game since 2001, yet on July 1 of this year, the New York Mets paid him $1.19 million. And they will every July 1 until 2035, as part of a def…

Sep. 30, 2016 at 10:00 AM

Bobby Bonilla hasn’t played in a professional baseball game since 2001, yet on July 1 of this year, the New York Mets paid him $1.19 million. And they will every July 1 until 2035, as part of a deferred contract that the Mets negotiated with Bonilla after the 1999 season. Instead of paying him $5.9 million that year, the Mets would owe Bonilla almost $30 million over the course of the deferred contract. How’d that happen? Watch the video above to find out.

Source: The Bobby Bonilla Retirement Plan: Quit Baseball In 2001, Get Paid Until 2035

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How Uber Used Secret Greyball Tool to Deceive Authorities Worldwide | New York Times

How Uber Deceives the Authorities Worldwide (New York Times)
A program uses data Uber collected to evade law enforcement in cities that resist the ride-hailing service, some current and former Uber employees said.

Continue reading “How Uber Used Secret Greyball Tool to Deceive Authorities Worldwide | New York Times”

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5 business books you should read this year | World Economic Forum

5 business books you should read this year (World Economic Forum)
Fortune round-up 5 business books to learn from.

Continue reading “5 business books you should read this year | World Economic Forum”

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