Revealed: how US billionaire helped to back Brexit | The Guardian

Read Revealed: how US billionaire helped to back Brexit by Carole Cadwalladr (The Guardian)
Robert Mercer, who bankrolled Donald Trump, played key role with ‘sinister’ advice on using Facebook data

🎧 This Week in Google 390: Bacon Shortage

Listened to This Week in Google 390: Bacon Shortage from twit.tv
Bacon reserves at a 50 year low. Our picks for the best tech billionaires' apocalypse bunker islands. Musical Trump tweets. Club Penguin shuts down. Super scary walking robots with wheels. Facebook de-verifies God. Google beats Q4 estimates; Facebook stomps all over them. Released: Feb 1st 2017

Jeff's Number: 97% of voice apps are used for one week
Stacey's Thing: Flash Forward Podcast
Leo's Tool: June Oven

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kNqBVUJSk84

‘What is happening???’ Times photographer explains how he captured that viral Oscars moment | LA Times

Read 'What is happening???' Times photographer explains how he captured that viral Oscars moment by James Reed (Los Angeles Times)
Times photographer Al Seib explains how he captured the jarring moment when the Oscars handed the best picture award to the wrong film.

5 Key Takeaways From President Trump’s Speech | The New York Times

Read 5 Key Takeaways From President Trump’s Speech by Glenn Thrush (nytimes.com)
At precisely the moment he needed to project sobriety, seriousness of purpose and self-discipline, Mr. Trump delivered the most presidential speech he has ever given.

What a Failed Trump Administration Looks Like | New York Times

Read What a Failed Trump Administration Looks Like (New York Times)
Without grown-ups in charge, the government could stop working.
Continue reading What a Failed Trump Administration Looks Like | New York Times

Fact-checking President Trump’s address to Congress | The Washington Post

Read Analysis | Fact-checking President Trump’s address to Congress by Glenn Kessler and Michelle Ye Hee Lee (Washington Post)
Most presidents try to be sure their speeches to Congress adhere closely to the facts. Not Donald Trump.
Continue reading Fact-checking President Trump’s address to Congress | The Washington Post

Stephen Colbert annotated Trump’s speech — and destroyed Kellyanne Conway in the process | Washington Post

Read Stephen Colbert annotated Trump’s speech — and destroyed Kellyanne Conway in the process by Lindsey Bever (Washington Post)
"Any chance there’s a mistake and ‘Moonlight’ is the president?” Colbert quipped.
Continue reading Stephen Colbert annotated Trump’s speech — and destroyed Kellyanne Conway in the process | Washington Post

Checkin University of California, Los Angeles

It’s still light outside finally!

There’s still a sliver of light out while waking to my 7:00 class.

There’s a sliver of moon and a single star shining in the sky as the sun goes down over UCLA.

🎧 This Week in Google 391: Probe Placement Problem

Listened to This Week in Google 391: Probe Placement Problem from twit.tv
The LG Sport and Style, the first Android 2.0 watches, come out this week. ACLU Amazon Dash Button. Vizio TV settles with FTC for $2.2 million over secret viewer tracking. House passes email privacy act. Facebook filters fake news in France. Google and H&M team up to design dresses.

Stacey's Things: Sergeant Tabata and Logitec ZeroTouch with Alexa
Jeff's Number: 1003 Meetups
Leo's Tool: Michael Bolton's Big, Sexy Valentine's Day Special on Netflix

https://youtu.be/9hQklVVOrh0

Social games: Turning an insight on its head: social as play | Jeremy Cherfas

Read Social games | Turning an insight on its head: social as play (jeremycherfas.net)
Stewart Butterfield is the chap who accidentally invented Flickr and then Slack. That alone makes him a pretty smart person. He also studied philosophy before deciding to get into software development. I know this because Jeremy Keith in my Huffduffer network liberated the audio of an interview with Ezra Klein from SoundCloud's silo and shared it.
Continue reading Social games: Turning an insight on its head: social as play | Jeremy Cherfas

Reply to Web Annotations are Now a W3C Standard, Paving the Way for Decentralized Annotation Infrastructure

Replied to Web Annotations are Now a W3C Standard, Paving the Way for Decentralized Annotation Infrastructure by Sarah Gooding (WordPress Tavern)
Web annotations became a W3C standard last week but the world hardly noticed. For years, most conversations on the web have happened in the form of comments. Annotations are different in that they usually reference specific parts of a document and add context. They are often critical or explanatory in nature.

Hypothesis Aggregator

Be careful with this plugin on newer versions of WordPress >4.7 as the shortcode was throwing a fatal error on pages on which it appeared.

p.s.: First!

Kris Shaffer, the plugin’s author

Here’s his original post announcing the plugin. #

Web annotation seems to promote more critical thinking and collaboration but it’s doubtful that it would ever fully replace commenting systems.

But why not mix annotations and comments together the way some in the IndieWeb have done?! A few people are using the new W3C recommendation spec for Webmention along with fragmentions to send a version of comments-marginalia-annotations to sites that accept them and have the ability to display them!

A good example of this is Kartik Prabhu’s website which does this somewhat like Medium does. One can write their response to a sub-section of his post on their own website, and using webmention (yes, there’s a WordPress plugin for that) send him the response. It then shows up on his site as a quote bubble next to the appropriate section which can then be opened and viewed by future readers.

Example: https://kartikprabhu.com/articles/marginalia

For those interested, Kartik has open sourced some of the code to help accomplish this.

While annotation systems have the ability to overlay one’s site, there’s certainly room for serious abuse as a result. (See an example at https://indieweb.org/annotation#Criticism.) It would be nice if annotation systems were required to use something like webmentions (or even older trackback/pingbacks) to indicate that a site had been mentioned elsewhere, this way, even if the publisher wasn’t responsible for moderating the resulting comments, they could at least be aware of possible attacks on their work/site/page. #