Checkin UCLA Mathematical Sciences Building

Turning caffeine into theorems.

A few boards into complex analysis already.
Caffeine and Theorems

Checkin Mathematical Sciences Building, UCLA

Complex Analysis part II

The walkway up to Math Sciences and the beautiful old tree outside.
I wish I had a living room with as many math books as this mini-library has.

Checkin Mathematical Sciences Building, UCLA

It’s true what they say, “Complex Analysis IS for lovers.” #theoremoncanonicalproducts #HappyValentinesDay

The Tuesday night meeting of the lonely hearts club aka Math Lovers Anonymous.

Cover of Elements of Complex Analysis by Louis L. Pennisi 📖📚

Cover of Elements of Complex Analysis by Louis L. Pennisi

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The first quarter of Complex Analysis is slowly drawing to a close

The first quarter of Complex Analysis is elderly drawing to a close.

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Photo taken at: UCLA Math Sciences Building

There’s still plenty of time to join us for the second installment in January!

Introduction to Complex Analysis–Part 2 | UCLA Extension

The second in a series of two quarters of advanced math focusing on complex analysis

The topic for Mike Miller’s UCLA Winter math course isn’t as much a surprise as is often the case. During the summer he had announced he would be doing a two quarter sequence on complex analysis, so this Winter, we’ll be continuing on with our complex analysis studies.

I do know, however, that there were a few who couldn’t make part of the Fall course, but who had some foundation in the subject and wanted to join us for the more advanced portion in the second half. Toward that end, below are the details for the course:

Introduction to Complex Analysis: Part II | MATH X 451.41 – 350370

Course Description

Complex analysis is one of the most beautiful and practical disciplines of mathematics, with applications in engineering, physics, and astronomy, to say nothing of other branches of mathematics.  This course, the second in a two-part sequence, builds on last quarter’s development of the differentiation and integration of complex functions to extend the principles to more sophisticated and elegant applications of the theory.  Topics to be discussed include conformal mappings, Laurent series and meromorphic  functions, Riemann surfaces, Riemann Mapping Theorem, analytical continuation, and Picard’s Theorem.  The course should appeal to those whose work involves the application of mathematics to engineering problems, and to those interested in how complex analysis helps explain the structure and behavior of the more familiar real number system and real-variable calculus.

Winter 2017
Days: Tuesdays
Time: 7:00PM to 10:00PM
Dates: Jan 10, 2017 to Mar 28, 2017
Contact Hours: 33.00
Location: UCLA, Math Sciences Building
Course Fee(s): $453.00
Available for Credit: 3 units
Instructors: Michael Miller
No refund after January 24, 2017.
Class will not meet on one Tuesday to be announced.

Recommended Textbook: Complex Analysis with Applications by Richard A. Silverman, Dover Publications; ISBN 0-486-64762-5

 

Enroll Now

For many who will register, this certainly won’t be their first course with Dr. Miller–yes, he’s that good! But for the newcomers, I’ve written some thoughts and tips to help them more easily and quickly settle in and adjust: Dr. Michael Miller Math Class Hints and Tips | UCLA Extension

If you’d like additional details as well as lots of alternate textbooks, see the announcement for the first course in the series.

If you missed the first quarter and are interested in the second quarter but want a bit of review or some of the notes, let me know in the comments below.

I look forward to seeing everyone in the Winter quarter!

Michael Miller making a "handwaving argument" during a lecture on Algebraic Number Theory at UCLA on November 15, 2015. I've taken over a dozen courses from Mike in areas including Group Theory, Field Theory, Galois Theory, Group Representations, Algebraic Number Theory, Complex Analysis, Measure Theory, Functional Analysis, Calculus on Manifolds, Differential Geometry, Lie Groups and Lie Algebras, Set Theory, Differential Geometry, Algebraic Topology, Number Theory, Integer Partitions, and p-Adic Analysis.
Michael Miller making a “handwaving argument” during a lecture on Algebraic Number Theory at UCLA on November 15, 2015. I’ve taken over a dozen courses from Mike in areas including Group Theory, Field Theory, Galois Theory, Group Representations, Algebraic Number Theory, Complex Analysis, Measure Theory, Functional Analysis, Calculus on Manifolds, Differential Geometry, Lie Groups and Lie Algebras, Set Theory, Differential Geometry, Algebraic Topology, Number Theory, Integer Partitions, and p-Adic Analysis.

Fundamental Theorem of Algebra

Fundamental Theorem of Algebra

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📖 On page 24 of 274 of Complex Analysis with Applications by Richard A. Silverman

📖 On page 24 of 274 of Complex Analysis with Applications by Richard A. Silverman

I enjoyed his treatment of inversion, but it seems like there’s a better way of laying the idea out, particularly for applications. Straightforward coverage of nested intervals and rectangles, limit points, convergent sequences, Cauchy convergence criterion. Given the level, I would have preferred some additional review of basic analysis and topology; he seems to do the bare minimum here.

Millions of photos of legs by beaches and pools… Now you suddenly realize what they’ve all been missing.

Millions of photos of legs by beaches and pools... Now you suddenly realize what they've all been missing: a math book on Harmonic Analysis 💡💣📚👓🎓🌡️🌞💯🔥

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Photo taken at: Gerrish Swim & Tennis Club

Just spent the last 25 minutes hanging out with Terry Tao talking about complex analysis, blogging, and math pedagogy

Just spent the last 25 minutes hanging out with Terry Tao talking about complex analysis, blogging, and math pedagogy

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Dr. Tao is keeping a great set of complex analysis notes on his blog.