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📑 We Have Never Been Social | Kathleen Fitzpatrick

Replied to We Have Never Been Social by Kathleen FitzpatrickKathleen Fitzpatrick (Kathleen Fitzpatrick)
What are the crucial texts and ideas I should be engaging with?  

I’d also look at doing some interviews as well. Starting with Tantek Çelik, Kevin Marks, (both previously of Technorati in the early blogging days, pre social), Dave Winer, Anil Dash, David Weinberger, and Doc Searles.

📑 We Have Never Been Social | Kathleen Fitzpatrick

Annotated We Have Never Been Social by Kathleen FitzpatrickKathleen Fitzpatrick (Kathleen Fitzpatrick)
I imagine that the first part of this project will focus on how it got to be this way, what got missed or ignored in some of the early warnings about what was happening online and how those warnings were swamped by the hype depicting the Internet as a space of radical democratization.  

I love the brewing idea here. We definitely need this.

Some broad initial bibliography from the top of my head:

Larry Sanger (co-founder of Wikipedia)

Some useful history/timelines:

I’m curious if you’d publicly share your current blbliography/reading list?

🎧 The Web at 30 | What’s New Podcast

Listened to The Web at 30 by Dan CohenDan Cohen from whatsnewpodcast.org

The World Wide Web just turned 30 years old, and so much has changed over those three decades because of this powerful new medium. Books, music, and video are beamed instantly around the globe, and authors, artists, and the giant industries around them have reacted in excited, complicated and sometimes fearful ways. Joining us on episode 29 is Kyle Courtney, a legal scholar and lecturer here at Northeastern University, and the copyright advisor for Harvard University. Kyle is a leading expert on intellectual property and copyright law during the era of the Web, and someone who has thought actively and creatively about the past present and future of what we do and say online. 

❤️ Mickey_McCauley tweeted 1992: There are 8 websites. they do nothing 1999: There are 5 million websites dedicated to every conceivable interest or curiosity 2019: There are 8 websites. they do nothing, but you must be on them continuously in order to exist

Liked a tweet by John Miguel McCauleyJohn Miguel McCauley (Twitter)

👓 Graying Out | Tim Bray

Read Graying Out by Tim Bray (tbray.org)
For many years I’ve interacted with my fellow humans, I think perhaps more than any other way, via the medium of Internet chat. But in my chat window, they’re fading, one by one. This problem is technical and personal and I felt it ought not to go unrecognized.

An interesting piece about the death of chat clients in lieu of social media. He’s got a list of some interesting people here, many of whom can be found on their own websites now.

📺 Taking Back The Web | Jeremy Keith | Webstock ’18

Watched Webstock '18: Taking Back The Web by Jeremy Keith from Vimeo

In these times of centralised services like Facebook, Twitter, and Medium, having your own website is downright disruptive. If you care about the longevity of your online presence, independent publishing is the way to go. But how can you get all the benefits of those third-party services while still owning your own data? By using the building blocks of the Indie Web, that’s how!

Presentation slide-deck: speakerdeck.com/adactio/taking-back-the-web

👓 Groupware Bad

Read Groupware Bad (jwz.org)

Greetings, people of the future!

This piece has gotten a lot of attention over the years. I have heard a lot of people saying that they had been "inspired" by it. I fear that what they meant was that they were inspired by the one pull-quote that people tend to quote from it, and ignored the rest. So if someone has linked you to this page, or if you've googled that pull-quote and ended up here, let me give you some context. I wrote this in 2005, which was was more than a year before Facebook was open to the general public.

The world was different then.

When I hear people say that they were "inspired" by this, I fear that the result of such inspiration was most likely to cause them to participate in the construction of the Public-Private Surveillance Partnership. These people told themselves that they were building tools to "bring people together" when in fact what they were doing was constructing and enabling the information-broker business models used by companies like Facebook and Equifax, where people are not the customers but rather are the raw materials whose personal details are the product.

I was talking about decentralization and empowerment of the individual. They went and build the exact opposite.

It's not a great feeling to think that someone may have read your words and then gone on to construct the dystopian hellscape that we're now living in, where Twitter is the prime enabler of actual Nazis and Facebook's greatest accomplishment has been to put a racist rapist in the White House.

If all the people who claimed to have been "inspired" by this piece hadn't been, and had just kept writing middleware for banks or whatever, the world might have been a slightly better place.

I wish I had never published this.

- jwz, 24-Nov-2017

👓 Friday, August 10, 2018 | Scripting News

Read Friday, August 10, 2018 by Dave Winer (Scripting News)
I got an email in the middle of the night asking if I had seen an announcement from Berkman Center at Harvard that they will stop hosting blogs.harvard.edu. It's not clear what will happen to the archives. Let's have a discussion about this. That was the first academic blog hosting system anywhere. It was where we planned and reported on our Berkman Thursday meetups, and BloggerCon. It's where the first podcasts were hosted. When we tried to figure out what makes a weblog a weblog, that's where the result was posted. There's a lot of history there. I can understand turning off the creation of new posts, making the old blogs read-only, but as a university it seems to me that Harvard should have a strong interest in maintaining the archive, in case anyone in the future wants to study the role we played in starting up these (as it turns out) important human activities.

This is some earthshaking news. Large research institutions like this should be maintaining archives of these types of things in a defacto manner. Will have to think about some implications for others in the DoOO and IndieWeb spaces.