🔖 Learn Kanji using flash cards

Bookmarked Learn Kanji using flash cards (kanji-trainer.org)
Learn the Kanji by drawing with your finger at the smartphone. With explanations of the radicals and mnemonic helps, sample vocabulary, OCR-handwriting-character-recognition,...
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🔖 The Furiganizer – Learn how to read Japanese Kanji. Faster.

Bookmarked The Furiganizer (furiganizer.com)
Learn how to read Japanese Kanji. Faster. Enter any Japanese text and click "Furiganize" to obtain beautiful Furigana.

For doing digital furigani

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🔖 Kanji stroke order font v4.001

Bookmarked nihilistorguk (nihilist.org.uk)
ティムのウェブサイト A downloadable font that has Japanese character font order indicated.

This is a cool looking font in addition to having some actual use!

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🔖 Kanji alive: A free study tool for reading and writing kanji

Bookmarked Kanji Alive (kanjialive.com)
Welcome to Kanji alive, a web application (http://app.kanjialive.com) designed to help Japanese language students of all levels learn to read and write kanji. Kanji alive is a resource for learning kanji, dedicated to helping you open the door to the fascinating characters that form the written Japanese language. All of the content in the application was created and reviewed with painstaking attention to detail by experienced Japanese instructors in order to help you best study, practice and retain kanji.
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👓 Jōyō kanji | Wikipedia

Read Jōyō kanji (Wikipedia)
The jōyō kanji (常用漢字, literally "regular-use Chinese characters") is the guide to kanji characters and their readings, announced officially by the Japanese Ministry of Education. Current jōyō kanji are those on a list of 2,136 characters issued in 2010. It is a slightly modified version of the tōyō kanji, which was the initial list of secondary school-level kanji standardized after World War II. The list is not a comprehensive list of all characters and readings in regular use; rather, it is intended as a literacy baseline for those who have completed compulsory education, as well as a list of permitted characters and readings for use in official government documents. Due to the requirement that official government documents make use of only jōyō kanji and their readings, several rare characters are also included by dint of being a part of the Constitution of Japan, which was being written at the same time the original 1850-character tōyō kanji list was compiled. The 2,136 kanji in the jōyō kanji consist of: 1,006 kanji taught in primary school (the kyōiku kanji) 1,130 additional kanji taught in secondary school Foreign learners of Japanese also often focus their kanji studies on the jōyō kanji list.

 

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How to Write in Japanese – a guest post from jlptbootcamp | The Memrise Blog

Read How to Write in Japanese – a guest post from jlptbootcamp (The Memrise Blog)
If you are learning Japanese on Memrise, you have probably come across one of our most active and long standing contributors, jlptbootcamp. Other than adding and editing a good proportion of the wo…

Continue reading “How to Write in Japanese – a guest post from jlptbootcamp | The Memrise Blog”

Installing Google’s IME so I can type Japanese hiragana on my keyboard more easily https://www.google.co.jp/ime/

Installing Google’s IME so I can type Japanese hiragana on my keyboard more easily https://www.google.co.jp/ime/

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