👓 Marie Kondo v. Tsundoku: Competing Japanese Philosophies on Whether to Keep or Discard Unread Books | Open Culture

Read Marie Kondo v. Tsundoku: Competing Japanese Philosophies on Whether to Keep or Discard Unread Books (Open Culture)
By now we've all heard of Marie Kondo, the Japanese home-organization guru whose book The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up became an international bestseller in 2011.

Having minimized many of the things in my life, I’ll say that getting rid of books was something I just couldn’t bring myself to do either.

📺 "Tidying Up with Marie Kondo" Empty Nesters | Netflix

Watched "Tidying Up with Marie Kondo" Empty Nesters from Netflix

These episodes don’t really do a very good job of selling the stronger ideas in her books. They’re vaguely entertaining, but could be much more content rich, particularly with the outlines and details she’s got in her source material. The problem is compounded by the fact that the families they’re featuring aren’t really that interesting or watchable.

👓 Used Clothing Floods Beacon’s Closet, Courtesy of Netflix’s “Tidying Up with Marie Kondo” | The New Yorker

Read Used Clothing Floods Beacon’s Closet, Courtesy of Netflix’s “Tidying Up with Marie Kondo” (The New Yorker)

👓 Engage. Disengage. Repeat. | Kathleen Fitzpatrick

Read Engage. Disengage. Repeat. by Kathleen FitzpatrickKathleen Fitzpatrick (Kathleen Fitzpatrick)
I believe that I have caught myself just this side of a major case of burnout. If that sentence is an exaggeration, it’s not by much. A few friends who had the dubious pleasure of talking wit…

👓 ‘We Are All Accumulating Mountains of Things’ | The Atlantic

Read ‘We Are All Accumulating Mountains of Things’ (The Atlantic)
How online shopping and cheap prices are turning Americans into hoarders

The irony of reading this given the material I’ve been reading about materialism and minimalism lately. I think that just today I threw out about 50 pounds of old junk I didn’t need and have piles of old, well-used things that have gone past their useful lives to me.

People keep fettering while I’m always unfettering….

Reply to Steve Dowe on Life-Changing Magic

Replied to Experiencing The Life-Changing Magic of Decluttering by Steve DoweSteve Dowe (dowe.io)
Marie Kondo’s bestseller, The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up (Amazon link), is quite an inspiration. She takes what is, essentially, a slightly mundane activity – decluttering – and transforms it into a ritual; a rite of passage for one who wants to transcend from disorganised hoarder, to ...

I ran across her book a year ago and thought it was pretty well thought out. I’d long spent a lot of my life and time and effort trying to just generally get rid of things (often including ones that brought me real joy). Keeping things that bring me joy was a lovely revelation; it was pretty easy to get rid of the rest.

I ought to do more frequent tidying, but having done a major purge last year just before I moved into a new house has made a huge difference in my life and general happiness level.

👓 The Billionaire’s Typewriter | Butterick’s Practical Typography

Read The billionaire’s typewriter by Matthew But­t­er­ick (Butterick’s Practical Typography)
A friend pointed me to a story on Medium called “Death to Type­writ­ers,” by Medium de­signer Marcin Wichary. The story is about the in­flu­ence of the type­writer on dig­i­tal type­set­ting. It ref­er­ences my “ex­cel­lent list” of type­writer habits.

Highlights, Quotes, Annotations, & Marginalia

Min­i­mal­ism doesn’t fore­close ei­ther ex­pres­sive breadth or con­cep­tual depth. On the con­trary, the min­i­mal­ist pro­gram—as it ini­tially emerged in fine art of the 20th cen­tury—has been about di­vert­ing the viewer’s at­ten­tion from overt signs of au­thor­ship to the deeper pu­rity of the ingredients.  

This also sounds like a great way to cook!

Like all non­sense, it’s in­tended to be easy to swal­low.  

You’re giv­ing up far more than de­sign choice. Mr. Williams de­scribes Medium’s key ben­e­fit as res­cu­ing writ­ers from the “ter­ri­ble dis­trac­tion” of for­mat­ting chores. But con­sider the cost. Though he’s bait­ing the hook with de­sign, he’s also ask­ing you, the writer, to let him con­trol how you of­fer your work to read­ers. Mean­ing, to get the full ben­e­fit of Medium’s de­sign, you have to let your story live on Medium, send all your read­ers to Medium, have your work per­ma­nently en­tan­gled with other sto­ries on Medium, and so on—a sig­nif­i­cant concession.  

You’re definitely not owning your own data.

Boiled down, Medium is sim­ply mar­ket­ing in the ser­vice of more mar­ket­ing. It is not a “place for ideas.” It is a place for ad­ver­tis­ers. It is, there­fore, ut­terly superfluous.  

Review and notes from The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing by Marie Kondo

The Life-changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing Book Cover The Life-changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing
Marie Kondo
House & Home
Ten Speed Press
October 14, 2014
Kindle e-book
226

Presents a guide to cleaning and organizing a living space, discussing best methods for decluttering and the impact that an organized home can have on mood and physical and mental health.

I originally picked this up on April 18th when my brother Steve had asked me if I could track down a copy for him. Last week another friend mentioned it at brunch with her recommendation, so I thought I’d give it a shot.

Kondo does an excellent job of highlighting the most important parts of the book as she goes along, so it’s rather easy to skim back through the book for important parts.

The basic gist is to get rid of everything in one’s home that doesn’t “spark joy” when physically holding it. It’s not too dissimilar to the philosophy set forward by designer/artist William Morris who once said, “Have nothing in your house that you do not know to be useful, or believe to be beautiful.”

Most of the book is devoted to some of the basic philosophy as well as recommendations about how to go about paring things down and storing them. In particular I found some of her ideas about folding things interesting and I was a bit surprised at how one can differently fold things to not only save space in drawers, but to also make them easier to see and choose.

I went so far as to watch some videos about how she folds:

This series of short videos and a few longer talks do a relatively good job of encapsulating the contents of the book.

An interesting thing I find in what I’m supposing is a translation from Japanese is that though the translation is strong, the flavor of the writer’s Japanese culture still burns through the philosophy and story of the work. To me these were some of the most interesting parts of her story.

Reading Progress
  • 05/06/17 started reading
  • 05/06/17 72.0% done; “A quick and breezy read with some simple prescriptive actions.”
  • 05/08/17 100.0% done
  • Finished book on 05/08/17

Highlights, Quotes, & Marginalia

Why can’t I keep my house in order?

If you tidy up in one shot, rather than little by little, you can dramatically change your mind-set.

Highlight (yellow) – Why can’t I keep my house in order? > Location 247

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Tidying is just a tool, not the final destination. The true goal should be to establish the lifestyle you want most once your house has been put in order.

Highlight (yellow) – Why can’t I keep my house in order? > Location 300

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Putting things away creates the illusion that the clutter problem has been solved. […] This is why tidying must start with discarding.

Highlight (yellow) – Why can’t I keep my house in order? > Location 320

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…the space I live in is graced only with those things that speak to my heart.

Highlight (yellow) – Why can’t I keep my house in order? > Location 402

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Finish discarding first

Start by discarding, all at once, intensely and completely

Highlight (yellow) – Finish discarding first > Location 407

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The urge to point out someone else’s failure to tidy is usually a sign that you are neglecting to take care of your own space.

Highlight (yellow) – Finish discarding first > Location 620

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In fact, that particular article of clothing has already completed its role in your life, and you are free to say, “Thank you for giving me joy when I bought you,” or “Thank you for teaching me what doesn’t suit me,” and let it go.

Highlight (yellow) – Finish discarding first > Location 698

\Added on Saturday, May 6, 2017

To truly cherish the things that are important to you, you must first discard those that have outlived their purpose.

Highlight (yellow) – Finish discarding first > Location 706

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Tidying by category works like magic

You may have wanted to read it when you bought it, but if you haven’t read it by now, the book’s purpose was to teach you that you didn’t need it.

Highlight (yellow) – Tidying by category works like magic > Location 1013
This is essentially sacrilege to me, but then again most all books give me a spark of joy.

Added on Saturday, May 6, 2017

Storing your things to make your life shine

…storage “solutions” are really just prisons within which to bury possessions that spark no joy.

Highlight (yellow) – Storing your things to make your life shine > Location 1426

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Never pile things: vertical storage is the key

Highlight (yellow) – Tidying by category works like magic > Location 1551

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Never hang on to them in the belief that you might use them someday.

Highlight (yellow) – Tidying by category works like magic > Location 1602

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This is why I urge you to refrain from stocking up on things.

Highlight (yellow) – Tidying by category works like magic > Location ####
TOKUMNOTE

Added on Monday, May 8, 2017

This is why I urge you to refrain from stocking up on things.

Highlight (yellow) – Tidying by category works like magic > Location 1759
She’s talking about socks/stockings here. Pun intended? 🙂

Added on Monday, May 8, 2017

When you treat your belongings well, they will always respond in kind. For this reason, I take time to ask myself occasionally whether the storage space I’ve set aside for them will make them happy. Storage, after all, is the sacred act of choosing a home for my belongings.

Highlight (yellow) – Tidying by category works like magic > Location 1831

Added on Monday, May 8, 2017

The magic of tidying dramatically transforms your life

I truly believe that our possessions are even happier and more vibrant when we let them go than when we first get them.

Highlight (yellow) – The magic of tidying dramatically transforms your life > Location 2044

Added on Monday, May 8, 2017

Guide to highlight colors

Yellow–general highlights and highlights which don’t fit under another category below
Orange–Vocabulary word; interesting and/or rare word
Green–Reference to read
Blue–Interesting Quote
Gray–Typography Problem
Red–Example to work through