📅 RSVP An Introduction to Microformats: November 7, 2018

RSVPed Unable to Attend An Introduction to Microformats: November 7, 2018
PayLease – San Diego, CA
I'll be giving a talk about microformats at the SDPHP meetup group. Learn about microformats(.org), a simple way to markup structural information in your HTML. I will walk through how to publish microformats, how they are parsed, and some compelling use-cases for both publishers and consumers. For more information and RSVP, visit the meetup.com event page.
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I wish I could attend this talk by gRegor this week. If you’re a web developer or designer in the San Diego area, I highly recommend you attend as there aren’t many people who could speak on this important topic as well as he can.

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🔖 Open Design Kit: A toolkit for designing with distributed collaborators | Bocoup

Bookmarked Open Design Kit: A toolkit for designing with distributed collaborators by Jess KleinJess Klein (bocoup.com)

Today, we are pleased to announce Open Design Kit – a collection of remixable methods designed to support creativity and problem solving within the context of the agile and distributed 21st century workplace. We are creating this kit to share the techniques we use within our open design practice at Bocoup and teach to collaborators so they can identify and address design opportunities. As of the publication of this post, the kit can be accessed in a GitHub repository and it contains a dozen methods developed by fifteen contributors – designers, educators, developers from in and outside of Bocoup.

Design literacy needs to be constantly developed and improved throughout the software and product development industry. Designers must constantly level up their skillsets with lifelong learning. Engineers often need to learn how to collaborate and incorporate new practices into their workflow to successfully support the integration of design.

Clients and stakeholders are repeatedly challenged by the fact that design is a verb that needs constant attention and not a noun that is handed off.

To address this, Bocoup is openly compiling a suite of learning materials, methods, and systems to help our staff, clients, colleagues, and community better understand how we design and when to roll up their sleeves and get in on the action. It is our hope that this exploration will be useful for other companies and individuals to incorporate into their practice.

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📺 IndieWebCamp NYC 2018 Jess Klein Keynote | YouTube

Watched IndieWebCamp NYC 2018 Keynote: Designing for participation in open spaces by Jess Klein from YouTube

Catching up on the last of the keynotes that I missed a few weeks back from IWC-NYC. Now I’ll have to spend some time going through the materials Jess highlighted…

👓 Just a Thought: Design for Selfishness | Powazek

Read Just a Thought: Design for Selfishness by Derek Powazek (powazek.com )
In 1996, Paulina Borsook wrote a story that, frankly, really pissed me off. In "Cyberselfish," published in Mother Jones and eventually turned into a book, she wrote about how new have-it-your-way technology was creating a generation of spoiled brats with computers. I took umbrage. Not only was I a proud member of the generation she was lambasting (a generation that is now oldschool on the internet, for whatever that's worth), but I had personally observed just the opposite. I witnessed people using new digital tools to collaborate. I saw more selflessness and altruism online than off.

Highlights, Quotes, Annotations, & Marginalia

I think the internet’s core message can be summed up in one word: Share.  

An early reference to the sharing economy?
October 04, 2018 at 09:08AM

The last thing most people need is another microphone. They need something to say. (And time to say it.)  

Interesting to hear this from 2006 and looking back now…
October 04, 2018 at 09:12AM

Designing for selfishness does not mean abandoning the group good.  

October 04, 2018 at 09:14AM

Except that the aggregate selfish behavior of millions of people tagging billions of photos means that the public tag pages make entertaining surfing for everyone.  

Reading this reminds me of some of Brad Enslen and Kicks Condor‘s conversations about discovery on the net.

How can one leverage selfish behaviour to the benefit of all?
October 04, 2018 at 09:15AM

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👓 Twitter’s redesigning its website, and it’s really, really white | Mashable

Read Twitter's redesigning its website, and it's really, really white (Mashable)
Twitter's new website is on the way.
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👓 Paving the cowpaths: using architecture concepts to improve online user experience | Elezea

Read Paving the cowpaths: using architecture concepts to improve online user experience by Rian Van Der MerweRian Van Der Merwe (Elezea)
In architecture desire lines or cowpaths describe well-worn paths that appear in a landscape over time. I discuss how this relates to web design.

This is interesting/relevant to the idea of “manual until it hurts”. I particularly like the twist idea at the end of looking at activity after-the-fact and then paving over those methods rather than starting at free range and then paving.

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Reply to Sara Soueidan about front end development feeds

Replied to a tweet by Sara SoueidanSara Soueidan (Twitter)

I tinker on my own website and frequently write about IndieWeb related technologies because the web is my social media platform. The feed you might appreciate most is https://boffosocko.com/category/indieweb/feed/.

I have feeds for nearly every tag/category or post type on my site for convenience (just add /feed/ to almost anything). You could subscribe to my firehose feed, but I suspect even my mother would tire of it quickly.

I’m curious if you have OPML files or similar bundles of feeds you follow that are shareable or subscribe-able?

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Over 1 million Webmentions can’t be wrong. Join the next revolution in web communication. Add the Webmentions standard to your website to solve the biggest communications problem on today’s internet and add rich context to your content.

https://alistapart.com/article/webmentions-enabling-better-communication-on-the-internet

My post on A List Apart is up!

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Reposted a tweet by Devon ZuegelDevon Zuegel (Twitter)
In this first episode, I spoke with Andy Hertzfeld, who architected the operating system of the original Macintosh https://t.co/CqOLwm7LPm”
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An Indieweb Podcast: Episode 4 “Webmentions and Privacy”

Episode 4: Webmentions and Privacy


Running time: 1 h 16m 00s | Download (23.8 MB) | Subscribe by RSS

Summary: With the GDPR regulations coming into effect in Europe on May 25th, privacy seems to be on everyone’s mind. This week, we tackle what webmentions are, using them for backfeed, and the privacy implications.

 

Huffduff this Episode


Show Notes

Related Articles and Posts

Related IndieWeb wiki pages

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Following Adam Procter

Followed Adam Procter (adamprocter.co.uk)

designer-practitioner-researcher

I'm the Programme Leader for BA (Hons) Games Design & Art and Senior Teaching Fellow at Winchester School of Art (WSA). I sometimes get the chance to make Apps, Web stuff and work as UX and UI designer, developer and consultant.

I run the research-led teaching programme BA (Hons) Games Design & Art and am responsable for the programme structure, ethos, recruitment and attainment of all students. I teach across a wide range of games subject areas in all years as well but my main teaching revolves around year 3 and the development of final projects which can be viewed here http://winchester.games. I keenly teach both the academic theory and the practical application.

"Most learning is not the result of instruction. It is rather the result of unhampered participation in a meaningful setting." — Ivan Illich

The area I  mainly research is connected technology and edutech. I am investigating how to design tools for design education and the digtial medium via connected devices. My focus is on ethical, delightful design practice that embraces the studio culture. I am keen on open education, open practice and co-ops. This research is currently within the structure of a Webscience PhD, you can keep up to date at researchnot.es.

Reply to The Indieweb privacy challenge (Webmentions, silo backfeeds, and the GDPR) by Sebastian Greger

Replied to The Indieweb privacy challenge (Webmentions, silo backfeeds, and the GDPR) by Sebastian GregerSebastian Greger (sebastiangreger.net)
Originally intended to showcase a privacy-centred implementation of emerging social web technologies – with the aim to present a solution not initially motivated by legal requirements, but as an example of privacy-aware interaction design – my “social backfeed” design process unveiled intricate challenges for Indieweb sites, both for privacy in general and legal compliance in particular.

Again Sebastian Greger has written up a well-thought-out and nuanced approach to design. Here he discusses privacy and GDPR with a wealth of research and direct personal experience in these areas. He’s definitely written something interesting which I hope sparks the beginning of a broader conversation and evaluation of our ethics.

There’s so much to think about and process here, that I’ll have to re-read and think more specifically about all the details. I hope to come back to this later to mark it up and annotate it further.

I’ve read relatively deeply about a variety of privacy issues as well as the weaponization of data and its improper use by governments and businesses to unduly influence people. For those who are unaware of this movement over the recent past, I would highly recommend Cathy O’Neil’s text Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy, which provides an excellent overview with a variety of examples about how the misuse of data can be devastating not just to individuals who are broadly unaware of it, but entire segments of society.

There is a lot of publicly available data we reveal via social media and much of it one might flippantly consider “data exhaust” which has little, if any inherent value by itself. Unfortunately when used in aggregate, it can reveal striking things about us which we may either not be aware of ourselves or which  we wouldn’t want to be openly known.

My brief thought here is that much like the transition from the use of smaller arms and handguns, which can kill people in relatively small numbers, to weapons like machine guns on up to nuclear weapons, which have the ability to quickly murder hundreds to millions at a time, we will have to modify some of our social norms the way we’ve modified our “war” norms over the past century. We’ll need to modify our personal social contracts so that people can still interact with each other on a direct basis without fear of larger corporations, governments, or institutions aggregating our data, processing it, and then using it against us in ways which unduly benefit them and tremendously disadvantage us as individuals, groups, or even at the level of entire societies.

In my mind, we need to protect the social glue that holds society together and improves our lives while not allowing the mass destruction of the fabric of society by large groups based on their ability to aggregate, process, and use our own data against us.

Thank you Sebastian for kicking off a broader conversation!

Disclaimer: I’m aware that in posting this to my own site that it will trigger a tacit webmention which will ping Sebastian Greger’s website. I give him permission to display any and all data he chooses from the originating web page in perpetuity, or until such time as I send a webmention either modifying or deleting the content of the originating page. I say this all with some jest, while I am really relying on the past twenty years of general social norms built up on the internet and in general society as well as the current practices of the IndieWeb movement to govern what he does with this content.

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👓 Gmail’s biggest redesign is now live | The Verge

Read Gmail’s biggest redesign is now live by Vlad Savov (The Verge)
Snoozing, nudging, hover actions, and a new sidebar — it’s a mobile app on the web!

I’ve been using gmail for about 2 years now and am curious to see what this delivers though I do have to admit I’m itching to going back to my old methods of owning may own email and data.

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Master View template

Filed an Issue IndieWeb Post Kinds (GitHub)
Adds support for responding to and interacting with other sites using the standards developed by the Indieweb Community

For ease-of-use as well as to help designers, theme builders, and maybe even Gen2 it might be useful to have a “master template” for views which includes all of the output of the data fields within Post Kinds in a single view.

If done in a relatively modular fashion with good commenting, perhaps even Gen2 folks could more easily delete or move pieces within such a master template to mash up various pieces to get what they’d like to display. Including alternate versions for displaying things could be useful as well (eg: raw display of things like start time and end time as well as a separate calculated duration time based on these two.)

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