Looking forward to brainstorming about  books at the next session at IndieWebCamp New Haven in about 30 minutes.

 

I’ve been researching all evening on some IndieWeb ideas as they relate to education. I’ll continue early tomorrow with IndieWebCamp New Haven, where I’ll be thinking and tinkering more with DoOO, SPLOTs, books, OER, and related topics.

Remote attendance is still a possibility for those interested.

Replied to a post by Greg McVerryGreg McVerry (quickthoughts.jgregorymcverry.com)
https://boffosocko.com @reclaimhosting added Press book to their installatron could do that and I am remixing https://adactio.com HTML book great idea for and @IndieWebCamp New Haven

Me goes to sign up for a Reclaim Hosting account tout suite. I’ve been meaning to do it for a long time just to support them.

The tough question is what domain name shall I choose for experiments?

I’m planning on proposing an OER or other book related session at the upcoming IndieWebCamp New Haven next weekend. If you’re interested or want to propose other ideas for or , I hope you’ll join us either in-person or remotely.

Not sure what to expect at a camp? Here are some additional details for both in-person and remote attendance.

👓 Why an HTML/CSS First Approach Works for #OER and why #OER Must Work for an HTML First Approach | Greg McVerry

Read Why an HTML/CSS First Approach Works for and why Must Work for an HTML First Approach by Greg McVerryGreg McVerry (quickthoughts.jgregorymcverry.com)
A few years ago I worked with a committed group of volunteers in Erode, India. For awhile I provided a bit of webspace as they learned the simple mechanics of running websites. using chalk to lay out websites We focused on HTMl first. Why? Mainly because we believed it to be the most equitable pathw...

This type of basic digital literacy is essential. Instead of teaching children D’Nealian or the Palmer method of cursive script in grade school, let’s evolve a bit and teach them some basic HTML.

👓 OER as an Institutional Survival Strategy | Inside Higher Ed

Read OER as an Institutional Survival Strategy by Matt Reed (Inside Higher Ed)
The difference between “tuition and fees” and “total cost of attendance.”

A nice highlighting of why administrators should be pushing for OER. Unfortunately lost here is the actual cost of the remainder of the enterprise. Where do these OER resources come from? Who creates them? Who gets paid to create and maintain them? Or quite often, whose resources, time, and effort are being exploited to use them? Additionally, who on the institutional level is being paid to talk about OER, push it, educate educators about it, and help professors adopt it?

While it’s readily transparent how his accounting works in this limited example, there’s a lot more accounting and transparency that needs to be taken into account.

Let’s not take the cost and just shift it to others who are also ill-equipped to handle it.

👓 Empower Teachers First | Hapgood

Read Empower Teachers First by Mike Caulfield (Hapgood)
Someone asked me today whether I could share any insights about OER creation. I have a few thoughts about that, but the one I always come back to is that you have to empower teachers first. You know that thing on planes where it’s like “In case of sudden decompression, put on your own oxygen mask first. Once it’s securely fastened, help those around you put on theirs?”

🔖 An Urgency of Teachers: The Work of Critical Digital Pedagogy by Sean Michael Morris and Jesse Stommel

Bookmarked An Urgency of Teachers: the Work of Critical Digital Pedagogy by Sean Michael Morris and Jesse Stommel (criticaldigitalpedagogy.pressbooks.com)
This collection of essays explores the authors’ work in, inquiry into, and critique of online learning, educational technology, and the trends, techniques, hopes, fears, and possibilities of digital pedagogy. For more information, visit urgencyofteachers.com.

👓 Fragment – ROER: Reproducible Open Educational Resources | OUseful.Info, the blog

Read Fragment – ROER: Reproducible Open Educational Resources by Tony Hirst (OUseful.Info)
Fragment, because I’m obviously not making sense with this to anyone… In the words of David Wiley (@opencontent), in defining the “open” in open content and open educational…

Reply to Think About Capabilities, Not Permissions

Replied to Think About Capabilities, Not Permissions by Nathan Smith (The Piraeus)
I suggest we can move OER forward by shifting the conversation from permissions to capabilities.

Thanks for this Nathan. I did write a somewhat longer response to a few critiques late last week that clarified my position. In some sense I wanted to raise the idea of version control and it’s power/value more so than to just add on another “requirement” on the permissions side.

👓 Think About Capabilities, Not Permissions | The Piraeus

Read Think About Capabilities, Not Permissions by Nathan Smith (The Piraeus)
I suggest we can move OER forward by shifting the conversation from permissions to capabilities.

👓 Another scenario for higher education’s future: the triumph of open | Bryan Alexander

Read Another scenario for higher education’s future: the triumph of open by Bryan Alexander (Bryan Alexander)

Let me offer another scenario for academia’s future. As is usual with the scenario forecasting methodology, this is based on extrapolating from several present-day trends – here, several trends around open.

In the past I’ve called this “The Fall of the Silos.” It’s a sign of our urban- and suburban-centric era that this rural metaphor doesn’t get a lot of traction. It’s also possible that contemporary American politics leads many to embrace silos. So I’ve renamed the scenario “The Triumph of Open.”

tl;dr version – In this future the open paradigm has succeeded in shaping the way we use and access most digital information, with powerful implications for higher education.

Following Catherine Cronin

Followed Catherine Cronin – open educator, open researcher, educational developer (catherinecronin.net)

I’m Catherine Cronin — open educator, open researcher and educational developer in CELT (Centre for Excellence in Learning & Teaching) at the National University of Ireland, Galway. My work focuses on open education, critical approaches to openness, digital identity practices, and exploring the interplay between formal and informal learning. In my recently completed PhD, I  explored the use of open educational practices (OEP) in higher education.

I am a member of the advisory board of the Open Education Working Group and a regular contributor to conversations and collaborative projects in the area of open education, within Ireland and globally. My academic background includes a BSc Mechanical Engineering, MEng Systems Engineering, and MA Women’s Studies (Gender & Technology). I’ve been involved in teaching, research and advocacy in higher education and in the community for over 25 years. Recent work, apart from my OEP research, includes creating an Open Education guidefor faculty and staff, collaborating to create the Equity Unbound curriculum, engagement in the global #icollab network, and facilitating workshops on open educationdigital identity, and digital wellbeing for educators and learners in different settings.

Please click on the link to my Blog or Contact above – or join in conversation with me on Twitter at @catherinecronin.

👓 University issues statement on textbook pricing | Louisiana.edu

Read University issues statement on textbook pricing (University of Louisiana at Lafayette)
The University of Louisiana at Lafayette issued the following statement regarding the pricing of textbook and software materials needed for Accounting 201 and 202. It can be attributed to Dr. Jaimie Hebert, the University’s provost. “We want to make it very clear to our students and the public that the University of Louisiana at Lafayette makes every effort to ensure that the materials required for courses are affordable. “We welcome the opportunity to clarify some confusion that resulted from the pricing of materials for Accounting 201 and 202.

👓 University’s $999 online textbook creates confusion and outrage | Inside Higher Ed

Read University's $999 online textbook creates confusion and outrage (Inside Higher Ed)
An online textbook priced at almost $1,000 has infuriated students trying to navigate an already confusing textbook marketplace, but Louisiana-Lafayette officials insist they had "good intentions."

This reporting doesn’t drill in far enough. Surely there are a few dozen textbooks that cover all of the same material that are roughly equivalent. What are those textbook prices? What about OER textbooks and their relative prices? Why is the department or even the professors doing anything but recommending textbooks? Why aren’t the students given the freedom to choose their own textbooks?