🎧 1.03: A Proportional Response (with Dulé Hill) | The West Wing Weekly

1.03: A Proportional Response (with Dulé Hill) by Josh Malina and Hrishi Hirway from The West Wing Weekly
Dulé Hill joins Josh and Hrishi to talk about shooting his first episode of The West Wing, visiting the real White House, and losing to Martin Sheen in 1-on-1.

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🎧 This Week in Google 442 Queen of the Mole Rats | TWiG

This Week in Google 442 Queen of the Mole Rats by Leo Laporte, Jeff Jarvis, Stacey Higginbotham from TWiT.tv
Amazon to launch its own internal healthcare service. Alphabet's Verily researches naked mole rats to extend human life. Facebook and Google promote local news. Google Clips on sale for some. Facebook Messenger Kids draws ire. Why you shouldn't buy Twitter followers. Bill Gate's new favorite book. The Boring Flamethrower. Stacey's Thing: Texting with Alexa; Jeff's Number: Google I/O May 8, Facebook F8 May 1-2

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🎧 Bread as it ought to be: Seylou Bakery in Washington DC | EatThisPodcast

Bread as it ought to be: Seylou Bakery in Washington DC by Jeremy Cherfas from Eat This Podcast
Jonathan Bethony is one of the leading artisanal bakers in America, but he goes further than most, milling his own flour and baking everything with a hundred percent of the whole grain. He’s also going beyond wheat, incorporating other cereals such as millet and sorghum in the goodies Seylou is producing. I happened to be in Washington DC just a couple of weeks after his new bakery had opened, and despite all the work that goes into getting a new bakery up and running, Jonathan graciously agreed to sit down and chat.

And almost as if to prove my point after writing about Modernist BreadCrumbs the other day, Jeremy’s latest episode is a stunning example of love and care in a podcast dedicated to food. I’m really so pleased that he can take a holiday, have so much fun with bread, and simultaneously turn it into something like this.

Even the title reads as if he were trying to out-do the entirety of eight episodes of Modernist BreadCrumbs in one short interview. I think he’s succeeded handily.

There’s so much great to unpack here, and simultaneously I wish there was more. I found myself wishing he’d had time to travel to some of the farms and done a whole series. With any luck he actually has–I wouldn’t put it past him–and we’ll be delighted in a week or two when they’re released.

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🎧 Modernist BreadCrumbs | Episode 8: Breadbox

Modernist BreadCrumbs | Episode 8: Breadbox from Heritage Radio Network
Bread is immeasurable, no longer bound by precepts. The new dictum of baking bread is built on shapes and sizes we haven’t even dreamt of. This episode, the proverbial breadbox of the series, will hold all the bits of bread we haven’t gotten to yet, or have yet to be made.

This episode did a bit too much waxing poetic on bread. As a result, it probably would have done a far better job of having been episode one of the series instead of the last and instead edited to provide an introduction to bread and its importance. Even more so when I recall how dreadfully put together episode one of the series was.

On the science/tech front there were only one or two vignette’s here that were worth catching. The rest was just bread poetry.

One interesting aside was a short discussion about the “free” bread that restaurants often put out. Sadly, while still all-too-common, most places really put out bad bread instead of good bread. I often think how much I’d rather actually pay for such a product at a restaurant, particularly if it’s good. Perhaps I just need to leave more restaurants when they put out bad bread knowing that things probably aren’t going to improve?

Summary of the series: It wasn’t horrible, but it also wasn’t as great as I would have hoped. The primary hosts always sounded a bit too commercial and I felt like anytime I heard them I was about to hear a bumper commercial instead of the next part of the story. Somehow it always felt like the interviewer and the interviewee were never in the same room together and that it was all just cut together in post. It was painful to follow the first episode, but things smoothed out quickly thereafter and the production quality was generally very high. Sadly the editorial didn’t seem to be as good as the production value. I almost wonder if the book went out and hired a network to produce this for them, but just found the wrong team to do the execution.

Too often I found myself wishing that Jeremy Cherfas had been picked up to give the subject a proper 10+ episode treatment. I suspect he’d have done a more interesting in-depth bunch of interviews and managed to weave a more coherent story out of the whole. Alas, twas never thus.

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🎵 “I Need You” by America

I Need You by America from Warner Bros.
"I Need You," released in 1972, is the second single by the band America from their eponymous debut album America. The song was written by Gerry Beckley. It appears on the live albums Live (1977), In Concert (1985), In Concert (King Biscuit), Horse With No Name - Live! (1995), and The Grand Cayman Concert (2002). The studio version is included on the compilation albums Highway (2000) and The Complete Greatest Hits (2001). George Martin remixed the studio recording for inclusion on History: America's Greatest Hits (1975). An alternate mix from 1971 appears on the 2015 release Archives, Vol. 1.

🎧 Gillmor Gang: Doc Soup | TechCrunch

Gillmor Gang: Doc Soup by Doc Searls, Keith Teare, Frank Radice, and Steve Gillmor from TechCrunch
Recorded live Saturday, May 13, 2017. The Gang takes nothing off the table as Doc describes a near future of personal APIs and CustomerTech.

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🎧 This Week in Tech #649: Aging in Place

This Week in Tech #649: Aging in Place by Leo Laporte with Florence Ion, Jason Hiner, Larry Magid from TWIT.TV
CES and much more. Voice assistants are everywhere and IoT devices are getting smarter. Innovations in Sleep Tech that will improve your health. Elon Musk's Hyperloop is moving forward. Facebook is changing the Newsfeed feature and you might be shocked how. Some new brands might be popping up on Instagram feed and Stephen Colbert's app, Scripto, is being used by nearly everyone in late night new comedy.

My favorite part was the broad overview of CES shows over the past several decades and what they’ve generally focused on. It makes an interesting perspective on the state of technology for the past 40 or so years.

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🎧 This Week in the IndieWeb Audio Edition • November 26th – December 2nd, 2017

This Week in the IndieWeb Audio Edition • November 25th - December 2nd, 2017 by Marty McGuireMarty McGuire from martymcgui.re
You can find all of my audio editions and subscribe with your favorite podcast app here: martymcgui.re/podcasts/indieweb/. Music from Aaron Parecki’s 100DaysOfMusic project: Day 85 - Suit, Day 48 - Glitch, Day 49 - Floating, Day 9, and Day 11 Thanks to everyone in the IndieWeb chat for their feedback and suggestions. Please drop me a note if there are any changes you’d like to see for this audio edition!

Sometimes it feels like I’ve got a bookmarklet (not unlike Huffduffer, but with a twist) that I use throughout the week, and at the end someone lovingly hand-creates a synopsis podcast just for me! Thanks Marty!!

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🎧 This Week in Google: #432 Life of Pai | TWiT.TV

This Week in Google: #432 Life of Pai from TWiT.TV
Pixel Buds are "like spiders clawing in your ears." Net Neutrality will die on December 14th, no matter what you do to protest. DOJ blocks AT&T/Time Warner merger. Peter Thiel sells most of his Facebook stock, splits with Y Combinator, might buy Gawker.com assets. Google tracks Android locations. Tesla's big new truck. Stacey's Thing: CleverPet Jeff's Number: 9 Ways Twitter can punish miscreants, but usually doesn't. Leo's Tool: Radio3.io

This episode has a great discussion of net neutrality. (28m52s to roughly 1h06m00s) While it does cut a few corners for this particular audience, it has some useful and interesting history surrounding the topic. The three participants are all well versed in the issue and give it some excellent coverage.

There is also an interesting section talking about Facebook and discrimination. While they talk about dark ads and the targeting Russia did during the 2016 election as well as racist targeting, they don’t take into account data that is often used as a proxy for race. While many may be looking at the proximal problem, they’re missing the longer term problems that will ultimately surface at a later date. If not designed properly, the data is highly likely to be misused in the future, just in more subtle and harder to detect ways.

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🎧 This Week in the IndieWeb Audio Edition • November 18th – 24th, 2017 | Marty McGuire

This Week in the IndieWeb Audio Edition • November 18th - 24th, 2017 by Marty McGuireMarty McGuire from martymcgui.re
Audio edition for This Week in the IndieWeb for November 18th - 24th, 2017. You can find all of my audio editions and subscribe with your favorite podcast app here: martymcgui.re/podcasts/indieweb/. Music from Aaron Parecki’s 100DaysOfMusic project: Day 85 - Suit, Day 4...

Great as always Marty! Now that you’re done with all the interviews, if it’s not too much trouble, it might be interesting/worthwhile to bundle them all up in to one big “Interview” podcast.

Hopefully you’ll get a brand new batch of interviews coming up in Austin!

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🎧 This Week in Google: #431 Mordor, She Wrote | TWiT.TV

This Week in Google: #431 Mordor, She Wrote from TWiT.TV
Pixel Buds are getting bad reviews. Blasting Facebook and Google. Amazon pays $250 Million for Lord of the Rings TV rights. Alibaba's $25 billion Singles' Day. Self-driving trucks and flying cars. Hacking the Boeing 757. Xerox Alto turns 40.

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🎧 The Story Of Fats Domino’s ‘Ain’t That A Shame’ | NPR

The Story Of Fats Domino's 'Ain't That A Shame' from NPR.org | All Things Considered
This enduring hit showcases Domino's individual talents, and the early power of New Orleans music.

Somehow I was expecting a lot more from this series. Just as it seemed to be getting going, it was cut short. Half of the episode is the song itself, so prepare yourself when it kicks in.

I did appreciate the tidbit about how A&R executives sped up the track to make it difficult for white singers to imitate and appropriate the content which was very common at the time.

h/t to Kevin Smokler and Jeremy Cherfas for uncovering this for me on Huffduffer.com

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🎧 This Week in Tech: #640 Stand Clear of the Closing Doors | TWiT.TV

This Week in Tech: #640 Stand Clear of the Closing Doors from TWiT.tv
DOJ suggests that phone encryption kills people. Facebook wants to see you naked. Apple gets ready for its best holiday ever. Twitter gets 50 character names to go with its 280 character tweets. XBox One X is the best game system out there. Bill Gates will build his own city. Car ownership will be a thing of the past in 5 years. Intel and AMD team up. Alibaba sells $25 billion worth of stuff in one day while America's retail sector is tanking.

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🎧 Episode 79: IndieWebCamp venue | Timetable

Episode 79: IndieWebCamp venue | Timetable by Manton Reese from Timetable
Manton discusses hosting (and attending) his first ever IndieWebCamp.

I’m excited to hear there will be at least one more IndieWebCamp before the end of the year.

Manton, I too once hosted an IndieWebCamp without ever having attended one myself. My advice is don’t sweat it too much. If you’ve got a location, some reasonable wifi, and even a bit of food, you’ll be okay. The interesting people/community that gather around it and their enthusiasm will be what really make it an unforgettable experience.

Incidentally it was also simultaneously the first ever Bar Camp I had attended and one of the originators of the concept attended! I remember thinking “No pressure here.” It was a blast for me, and I’m sure will be great for you as well.

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🎧 It’s 2017. Why does medicine still run on fax machines? | Vox

It’s 2017. Why does medicine still run on fax machines? from Vox
How a plan to kill the fax machine with policy went awry.

This is a painfully sad and frustrating story. It also seems like something that business/capitalism isn’t going to solve on its own, but something which is crying out for an open spec to help things along. (And after that, if a business can come up with a better/faster solution, then more power to them.)

I can only think of the painful inefficiencies that are lurking in our healthcare system. And we wonder why things are so stupidly expensive?

This is a great example where applying César A. Hidalgo’s theory from Why Information Grows to decrease the friction for creating links can eliminate inefficiencies and create larger value. I still want to refine his statement into something simple and usable for both business and governmental use as well as to come up with some reasonably understandable math to provide a “proof” of the value.

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