📺 "House of Cards" Chapter 71 | Netflix

Watched "House of Cards" Chapter 71 from Netflix
Directed by Louise Friedberg. With Robin Wright, Michael Kelly, Diane Lane, Campbell Scott. Claire makes staff changes. The Shepherds try to recruit Doug to their side. With Mark facing intense scrutiny, Jane offers advice.

👓 Most valuable book ever. | The Magic Cafe Forums

Read Most valuable book ever. by jamessmithjamessmith (The Magic Cafe Forums - themagiccafe.com)
This is a very old thread that Delimbeau has re-opened and I think that the answer is extremely subjective. It depends how you define "value"; whether it be in respect of content or monetary worth. If the former, there are probably as many answers as there are books but if - as I think was the original ask - it is purely monetary there are only a few candidates, most of which have already been mentioned. First let's ditch Scot's "Discoverie of Witchcraft". Whilst the second issue of the third edition is likely the scarcest, the first edition will almost always be more valuable. Aside the magic content, this is a very desirable book in many fields and therefore always commands high prices. It is not, however, rare. As an update on price, copies of the first edition in the last couple of years have reached up to c. $70,000. Compare this with the aforementioned third edition, a copy of which a couple of weeks ago sold for "only" $14,000 + commission (in itself a high price). The Guyot, Dean and Pinetti mentioned in the thread we can also discount, as "comparatively" they are of little value (in any edition). Of known books on magic, likely "The Art of Jugling" (1st ed. 1612, 2nd ed. 1614) or "Hocus Pocus Junior" (1st ed. 1634, 2nd. ed 1635) would be the most valuable. "The Art of Jugling" was the first book solely devoted to magic in the English language (albeit plagiarised from Scot) and only one copy has been offered for sale in the lifetime of most people who will read this. The six-figure dollar asking price would exceed any copies of Scot's work I know of. Of course, "asking" and "sale" price will not necessarily be the same. Recent (i.e. last 10 years or so) copies of "Hocus Pocus Junior" have "only" reached the c. $36,000-$60,000 price range. These have been later editions. That said, a first edition certainly would achieve a price well above that, if one were to emerge - unlikely since none has been seen since the 1930s. In the event that it did, it may well exceed those prices recently realised by Scot first editions. Probably the most valuable book on magic is one that we do not yet know exists, or suspect that it does but a copy has never been seen. For example, some may be aware of Prevost's "La Premiere partie des subtiles et plaisantes inventions". It is a French illustrated book devoted solely to magic that predates Scot (by only a few months). As it is not in English it doesn't get as much attention but is arguably much more exciting from a purely magical context. For those French readers, you will note that Prevost's book was the "first part" (i.e. premiere partie). If a second part were to emerge, I would warrant it very valuable indeed. The potential "second part" of Prevost is but one example. Lost manuscripts or other early works (most likely in Italian) may also compete. The fact is, though, that regardless of content the majority of the market is English speaking, so early English works are likely to continue to command the highest prices, regardless of their rarity or importance. We must also remember that our field of interest is very niche. Another book with magic in it but with much wider appeal would attract more attention and - potentially - command a higher price; i.e. the high prices seen recently for first edition Scot's are predominantly NOT due to magic collectors but collectors with other fields of interest.

📺 “The Good Doctor” Carrots | ABC

Watched "The Good Doctor" Carrots from ABC
Directed by Sharat Raju. With Freddie Highmore, Nicholas Gonzalez, Antonia Thomas, Tamlyn Tomita. When a patient suffering from anorexia can't gain the necessary weight needed to survive heart surgery, Claire suggests they perform an experimental surgery which Melendez strongly opposes. Shaun worries Glassman's refusal to walk the hospital floor will keep him from being discharged and tries to persuade him to ambulate. Meanwhile, Shaun and Lea change the terms of their current relationship.

📺 “The Good Doctor” Tough Titmouse | ABC

Watched "The Good Doctor" Tough Titmouse from ABC
Directed by Steven DePaul. With Freddie Highmore, Nicholas Gonzalez, Antonia Thomas, Tamlyn Tomita. Shaun recalls his own past to help an intellectually disabled teenager, while Claire is put between an injured teenage rock climber and her worried parents. Meanwhile, Glassman's post-op hallucinations force him to confront a personal tragedy.

🔖 La Première partie des subtiles et plaisantes inventions, comprenant plusieurs jeux de récréation et traicts de soupplesse, par le discours desquels les impostures des bateleurs sont descouvertes. par Jean Prévost | Gallica

Bookmarked La Première partie des subtiles et plaisantes inventions, comprenant plusieurs jeux de récréation et traicts de soupplesse, par le discours desquels les impostures des bateleurs sont descouvertes. by Jean Prévost (Gallica)
The earliest known important book on conjuring or magic, printed in French in Lyons in 1584.
hat tip: Ricky Jay’s Magical Secrets (The New Yorker)

📺 “The Good Doctor” 36 Hours | ABC

Watched "The Good Doctor" 36 Hours from ABC
Directed by Larry Teng. With Freddie Highmore, Nicholas Gonzalez, Antonia Thomas, Tamlyn Tomita. Glassman is recovering from a surgery; Tensions rise in Dr. Melendez's OR; Shaun and Morgan need to get through a surprise 36 hour shift at the ER.
Some interesting questions on men/women and sexism in this episode.

👓 Scott opposes controversial judicial nominee | CNN

Read Scott opposes controversial judicial nominee (CNN)
Republican Sen. Tim Scott announced Thursday he would oppose President Donald Trump's nominee to be a US district judge in North Carolina, effectively ending the nomination that had been plagued with accusations that Thomas Farr supported measures that disenfranchised African-American voters.
Glad to see at least one person in the senate with a brain in their head.

👓 Ricky Jay’s Magical Secrets | The New Yorker

Read Ricky Jay’s Magical Secrets (The New Yorker)
Jay’s deft illusions flout reality, and he rejects the notion that his magic is a suitable entertainment for children.
A great set of stories about Ricky Jay.

Highlights, Quotes, Annotations, & Marginalia

I once asked Mamet whether Jay had ever shared with him details of his childhood.Mamet replied, “I can’t remember.”I said, “You can’t remember whether you discussed it or you can’t remember the details?”He said, “I can’t remember whether or not I know a better way to dissuade you from your reiteration of that question without seeming impolite.”  

November 29, 2018 at 12:44PM

Magic is about working hard to discover a secret and making something out of it. You start with some small principle and you build a theatrical presentation out of it. You do something that’s technically artistic that creates a small drama.  

November 29, 2018 at 12:48PM

Jean Prévost’s “La Première Partie des Subtiles et Plaisantes Inventions,” the earliest known important conjuring book, printed in Lyons in 1584.  

November 29, 2018 at 01:15PM

The main thing that dissuaded him, he says, is that “I wouldn’t want to sell a book to a philistine, which is what every bookseller has to do.”  

November 29, 2018 at 01:18PM

Two automatons stood on the table. One, called “The Singing Lesson,” was the creation of Jean-Eugène Robert-Houdin, the nineteenth-century watchmaker-turned-conjurer, who is considered the father of modern magic. The other was a Chinese cups-and-balls conjurer built by Robert-Houdin’s father-in-law, Jacques Houdin.  

November 29, 2018 at 01:34PM

Two automatons stood on the table. One, called “The Singing Lesson,” was the creation of Jean-Eugène Robert-Houdin, the nineteenth-century watchmaker-turned-conjurer, who is considered the father of modern magic. The other was a Chinese cups-and-balls conjurer built by Robert-Houdin’s father-in-law, Jacques Houdin.  

November 29, 2018 at 01:34PM

📺 Ricky Jay – 4 Queens 3 Ways | YouTube

Watched Ricky Jay: 4 Queens 3 Ways from YouTube

The incomparable Mr Jay demonstrating differing styles of patter and presentation working around a theme of the Four Ladies

The language here is almost more complicated than the trick.

👓 Site Notes | Rhoneisms

Read Site Notes by Patrick Rhone (patrickrhone.net)
This is an evolving set of rules and recommendations for this site. A philosophy.txt as it were. This is what constitutes an operating manual for Rhoneisms. It is also, more than anything, a promise to you the reader:
This blog is the sole website I will regularly publish my writing to moving forward.
I like that Patrick spends the time to lay out some of his philosophy.txt. There’s also a useful strategy for doing a multi-site IndieWeb.

👓 Frodo I Cant | Charlie Park

Read Frodo I Cant by Charlie ParkCharlie Park (charliepark.micro.blog)

Frodo: I can’t do this, Sam.

Sam: I know. It’s all wrong. By rights we shouldn’t even be here. But we are.

It’s like in the great stories Mr. Frodo. The ones that really mattered.

Full of darkness and danger they were, and sometimes you didn’t want to know the end. Because how could the end be happy? How could the world go back to the way it was when so much bad happened?

But in the end, it’s only a passing thing, this shadow. Even darkness must pass. A new day will come. And when the sun shines it will shine out the clearer.

Those were the stories that stayed with you. That meant something. Even if you were too small to understand why.

But I think, Mr. Frodo, I do understand. I know now.

Folk in those stories had lots of chances of turning back, only they didn’t. Because they were holding on to something.

Frodo: What are we holding on to, Sam?

Sam: That there’s some good in this world, Mr. Frodo. And it’s worth fighting for.