👓 Announcing @IndieWebCamp New Haven Keynote | Greg McVerry

Read Announcing @IndieWebCamp New Haven Keynote by Greg McVerryGreg McVerry (quickthoughts.jgregorymcverry.com)
I am happy to announce that Kimberly Hirsh will join us as the key note for IndieWebCamp New Haven.

I can’t wait to hear what Kimberly Hirsh comes up with for the upcoming camp!

👓 Your favorite way to get around The New York Times paywall might be about to go away | Nieman Lab

Read Your favorite way to get around The New York Times paywall might be about to go away (Nieman Lab)
Publishers are increasingly blocking those who use incognito mode to sneak around their paywalls. But browser makers may have the last laugh.

👓 Media Education and Change | Buzz Machine | Jeff Jarvis

Read Media Education and Change by Jeff Jarvis (BuzzMachine)
Lately I’ve been scolding myself that I have not been radical enough — yes, me, not nearly radical enough — about rethinking journalism in our...

👓 Europe Against the Net | Buzz Machine | Jeff Jarvis

Read Europe Against the Net by Jeff Jarvis (BuzzMachine)
I’ve spent a worrisome weekend reading three documents from Europe about regulating the net: The revived, revised, and worsened...

👓 [Update]: Will Twohey’s Building Be Saved? | ColoradoBoulevard.net

Read [Update]: Will Twohey’s Building Be Saved? by Garrett Rowlan (ColoradoBoulevard.net)
Built in 1951, Twohey’s restaurant in Alhambra is a structural grandparent in the constant architectural tumult that is Southern California. Yet the building’s fate hangs in the balance. The current owner wants to tear the building down and build something else. A move afoot is to make the building a historical monument (the building is located at Huntington Drive and Atlantic Boulevard).

How many years has it been since Twohey’s was supposed to leave the building anyway? Will they ever really go? That’s the real headline…

Of course it’s been several years since the food quality has hit rock bottom, so I suppose I don’t care that much anymore since I’m not planning to patronize them anymore.

👓 Alhambra Charges $30 to Attend State of the City Address | ColoradoBoulevard.net

Read Alhambra Charges $30 to Attend State of the City Address by Sean McMorris (ColoradoBoulevard.net)
If you want to attend Alhambra’s State of the City Address, you have to fork over $30 or sponsor a table for $300. You also had better be retired or get time off work to attend because it is on a weekday at 11:30 am. This always has been the case according to Sharon Gibbs, Executive Director of the Alhambra Chamber of Commerce and host of the State of the City Address. When asked if residents who did not want to pay the $30 fee could still attend, Ms. Valero, Chamber office assistant, said no.

50 year no-bid contract? Really Alhambra?! You should be ashamed of yourselves.

👓 There Are Whales Alive Today Who Were Born Before Moby Dick Was Written | Smithsonian

Read There Are Whales Alive Today Who Were Born Before Moby Dick Was Written (Smithsonian)
Some of the bowhead whales in the icy waters off of Alaska today are over 200 years old

An interesting idea to contemplate given the span of time.

👓 How long do floods throughout the millennium remain in the collective memory? | Nature

Read How long do floods throughout the millennium remain in the collective memory? by Václav Fanta, Miroslav Šálek & Petr Sklenicka (Nature Communications, volume 10, Article number: 1105 (2019) )
Is there some kind of historical memory and folk wisdom that ensures that a community remembers about very extreme phenomena, such as catastrophic floods, and learns to establish new settlements in safer locations? We tested a unique set of empirical data on 1293 settlements founded in the course of nine centuries, during which time seven extreme floods occurred. For a period of one generation after each flood, new settlements appeared in safer places. However, respect for floods waned in the second generation and new settlements were established closer to the river. We conclude that flood memory depends on living witnesses, and fades away already within two generations. Historical memory is not sufficient to protect human settlements from the consequences of rare catastrophic floods.

This is intriguing particularly when thinking back to our earliest world literatures which all involve flood stories.

I wonder what the equivalent sorts of things would be for C. elegans, drosophila, etc. for testing things on smaller timescales?

👓 'Captain Marvel' Shows How Trolls Lost Their Edge | WIRED

Read 'Captain Marvel' Shows How Trolls Lost Their Edge (WIRED)
They've been trying to sabotage the movie's success from the beginning. Their failure proves they're played out.

👓 The web we broke. | ethanmarcotte.com

Read The web we broke. by Ethan Marcotte (ethanmarcotte.com)

I read something depressing last Monday, and I can’t stop thinking about it.

At the end of February, WebAIM published an accessibility analysis of the top one million home pages. The results are, in a word, abysmal.

The research underpinning this sounds just dreadful. Fortunately Ethan has links to some great resources for creating a better start on web accessibility.

👓 Jonah Goldberg is ‘ideologically grounded, but I feel politically homeless’ | Columbia Journalism Review

Read Jonah Goldberg is ‘ideologically grounded, but I feel politically homeless’ (Columbia Journalism Review)

I’ve been wondering what the moral core of the conservative movement will be doing in the future. Too many are just blindly following Trump because it seems expedient. Goldberg is an interesting bellwether.

👓 Actresses, Business Leaders and Other Wealthy Parents Charged in U.S. College Entry Fraud | New York Times

Read Actresses, Business Leaders and Other Wealthy Parents Charged in U.S. College Entry Fraud (New York Times)
A sprawling federal investigation accuses 50 people of involvement in a scheme to get undeserving students into major American universities.