Thirteen: Backfeeding ideas with Brid.gy Let's say I syndicate a thought to Twitter. I can use Bri.gy to backfeed ideas and interactions with my Tweet back to my original in my digital notebook (where it's most useful).  This helps outside ideas filter into and interact with my own ideas. #HeyPresstoConf20 You knew ideas can have…

A note taking problem and a proposed solution

tl;dr It's too painful to quickly get frequent notes into note taking and related platforms. Hypothes.is has an open API and a great UI that can be leveraged to simplify note taking processes. Note taking tools I've been keeping notes in systems like OneNote and Evernote for ages, but for my memory-related research and work…
Replied to a tweet by Aram Zucker-ScharffAram Zucker-Scharff (Twitter)
#IndieWeb to the rescue. There are a few great options for this. None of which should require you to write any code!  One of my favorite is Kevin Marks' Noter Live (open source) which is great for live tweeting and creating long threads quickly, especially at conferences. When you're done, it's kept a record of…
Replied to A thread on Hypothes.is in relation to Audrey Watters' Top Ed-Tech Trends of 2015: Indie Ed-Tech by Audrey Watters, Jeremy Dean, Dan Whaley (Hack Education / Hypothes.is)

it supports students and teachers and schools in managing their own infrastructure, their own labor, their own data.

—Audrey Watters

Ok, so is hypothes.is doing this? How can it?

  • my annotations must be better accessible/organizable --the current "My Annotations" is not enough
  • annotation must be exportable

—jeremydean on Dec 30, 2015


And ultimately, you need to be able to completely run your own annotation infrastructure, but create and access it through a universal client.

—dwhly on Dec 30, 2015


Sure. Less clear to me how that looks/works and what that I do today online is similar in "ownership." But does your "you" refer to students or teachers or schools or all of the above?

The first two (I list) seem key in terms of practical adherence to these principles for everyday users.

—jeremydean on Dec 30, 2015


It's similar in character to the Domain of One's Own initiative. From a long term perspective, you might be better off taking ownership of your own infrastructure, that you can carry with you and guarantee will be available over long time periods (decades to centuries). Hypothes.is should at the very least permit you to do so if you prefer-- regardless of whether we continue to provide an annotation service at scale (which I very much think we should).

Your question around "you" is an important one. I might for instance, set up my own annotation server for my personal notes-- with the confidence that I'll always be able to find a reliable hosting provider for those. Similar to how I have my own web domain, and I host it at one place now, but I can always move it if that location goes out of business-- and my website will be identical to its current form in the new place. In the same way, my current personal email is through an address at my own domain. I don't need to depend on gmail being around forever.

As a teacher, I might use a more common service provider (like Hypothes.is) for class lessons-- one that my students are already likely to have accounts on. As web travelers, we're really accustomed to browsing seamlessly between servers-- it's understood to be the essential architecture of the web. Bringing it to the world of annotations has extraordinary benefits (IMHO) and will serve to foster more adoption and more diversity of applications.

—dwhly on Dec 30, 2015

I've been thinking over some of this question for the better part of a decade and even more pointedly since November. Some of what I've been looking at relates back to the renaissance ideas of the commonplace book as well as memory techniques dating back to ancient Greece and even further back. There are ideas…
Read My 100,000th Annotation: Looking back, forging ahead! by Heather StainesHeather Staines (web.hypothes.is)
Recently, I made my 100,000th annotation with Hypothesis. I know what you must be thinking: Doesn’t she have a life? Why would anyone make 100,000 annotations? Just a few short years ago, I would have dismissed this prospect as preposterous. I disliked reading online and abandoned most online tools at the first hurdle. Yet, here I am, a self-diagnosed annotation addict. (For those of you who don’t know me, I used to work for Hypothesis. Leaving to build open infrastructure didn’t mean that I left the tool behind — far from it!)
I've outlined the potentiality of using Hypothes.is as a CMS platform in the past. Heather has apparently taken it to heart and gone full bore. I hadn't included it at the time, but private groups are also an interesting way to share ideas and private posts with small groups of people. You could also use…
Read The Strange Quest to Crack the Voynich Code (Undark Magazine)
It’s an approximately 600-year-old mystery that continues to stump scholars, cryptographers, physicists, and computer scientists: a roughly 240-page medieval codex written in an indecipherable language, brimming with bizarre drawings of esoteric plants, naked women, and astrological symbols. Known...
a roughly 240-page medieval codex written in an indecipherable language, brimming with bizarre drawings of esoteric plants, naked women, and astrological symbols. Known as the Voynich manuscript, it defies classification, much less comprehension. ❧ Something I hadn't thought of before, but which could be highly likely given the contents: What if the manuscript is a personal…
Replied to About this site by Dan MackinlayDan Mackinlay (danmackinlay.name)
Many ideas about how this site is used and presented are cribbed from the notebooks of Cosma Shalizi, which I find a pleasant format to read. The content is my own, except where otherwise stated. The fiddly details of how it works are here, and the really fiddly in-progress details are on my TODO list.
I love your site Dan and follow many of the same philosophies myself. Your notebook idea is a great one. If you want to extend it a bit, you could go full digital commonplace book to encompass even more. I notice that in your follow me section you've got a handful of buttons that may…
Replied to a tweet by Dr. Ryan StraightDr. Ryan Straight (Twitter)
What a great prompt! Here are a few interesting off-label use cases I've used, imagined, or seen in the wild: Greg McVerry, Ian O'Byrne, and I have integrated Hypothes.is into our digital/online commonplace books in different ways. Greg's are embedded at https://jgregorymcverry.com/annotations, Ian discusses his process on his site, while mine show up as annotation…

Domains 2019 Reflections from Afar

My OPML Domains Project Not being able to attend Domains 2019 in person, I was bound and determined to attend as much of it as I could manage remotely. A lot of this revolved around following the hashtag for the conference, watching the Virtually Connecting sessions, interacting online, and starting to watch the archived videos…

Idea for a spaced repetition user interface for Hypothes.is

While I'm thinking about younger students, I thought I'd sketch out a bit of an add-on product that I wish Hypothes.is had. Background/Set up I was looking at tools to pull annotations out of Kindle the other day and ran across Readwise again. Part of its functionality pulls highlights and annotations out of Kindle and…

WPCampus 2019 Draft Proposal: Dramatically extending a Domain of One’s Own with IndieWeb technology

Below is a draft proposal which I'm submitting for a possible upcoming talk at WPCampus from July 25-27, 2019 in Portland, OR. If you don't have the patience and can't wait for the details, feel free to reach out and touch base. I'm happy to walk people through it all before then. If you're looking…

👓 Writing synthetic notes of journal articles and book chapters | Raul Pacheco-Vega, PhD

Read Writing synthetic notes of journal articles and book chapters by Raul Pacheco-Vega (raulpacheco.org)
Earlier this week I shared Dr. Katrina Firth’s modified version of the Cornell Method’s Notes Pages. I used the Cornell Notes method in 2013 and really didn’t click with me, so I simply moved on. Had I discovered Katrina’s modified version earlier I probably would have “clicked” with the...
Everything Notebook  ❧ by this I'm thinking he means commonplace book? Thursday, April 4, 2019 10:15 am
Bookmarked Paperpile: Modern reference and PDF management (paperpile.com)

Manage your research library right in your browser

  • Save time with a smart, intuitive interface
  • Access your PDFs from anywhere
  • Format citations within Google Docs

… and much more

I know I've run across this tool in the past, sometime just after it launched. I remember thinking it was interesting, but it was missing some things for me. Perhaps it's worth another look to see how it has evolved and what it entails now? In some sense it does a lot of what I've…