Replied to a tweet by Dr. Ryan StraightDr. Ryan Straight (Twitter)
What a great prompt! Here are a few interesting off-label use cases I've used, imagined, or seen in the wild: Greg McVerry, Ian O'Byrne, and I have integrated Hypothes.is into our digital/online commonplace books in different ways. Greg's are embedded at https://jgregorymcverry.com/annotations, Ian discusses his process on his site, while mine show up as annotation…

Domains 2019 Reflections from Afar

My OPML Domains Project Not being able to attend Domains 2019 in person, I was bound and determined to attend as much of it as I could manage remotely. A lot of this revolved around following the hashtag for the conference, watching the Virtually Connecting sessions, interacting online, and starting to watch the archived videos…

Idea for a spaced repetition user interface for Hypothes.is

While I'm thinking about younger students, I thought I'd sketch out a bit of an add-on product that I wish Hypothes.is had. Background/Set up I was looking at tools to pull annotations out of Kindle the other day and ran across Readwise again. Part of its functionality pulls highlights and annotations out of Kindle and…

WPCampus 2019 Draft Proposal: Dramatically extending a Domain of One’s Own with IndieWeb technology

Below is a draft proposal which I'm submitting for a possible upcoming talk at WPCampus from July 25-27, 2019 in Portland, OR. If you don't have the patience and can't wait for the details, feel free to reach out and touch base. I'm happy to walk people through it all before then. If you're looking…

👓 Writing synthetic notes of journal articles and book chapters | Raul Pacheco-Vega, PhD

Read Writing synthetic notes of journal articles and book chapters by Raul Pacheco-Vega (raulpacheco.org)
Earlier this week I shared Dr. Katrina Firth’s modified version of the Cornell Method’s Notes Pages. I used the Cornell Notes method in 2013 and really didn’t click with me, so I simply moved on. Had I discovered Katrina’s modified version earlier I probably would have “clicked” with the...
Everything Notebook  ❧ by this I'm thinking he means commonplace book? Thursday, April 4, 2019 10:15 am
Bookmarked Paperpile: Modern reference and PDF management (paperpile.com)

Manage your research library right in your browser

  • Save time with a smart, intuitive interface
  • Access your PDFs from anywhere
  • Format citations within Google Docs

… and much more

I know I've run across this tool in the past, sometime just after it launched. I remember thinking it was interesting, but it was missing some things for me. Perhaps it's worth another look to see how it has evolved and what it entails now? In some sense it does a lot of what I've…

A Sketch for an IndieWeb Bullet Journal

Over the past several weeks I've been thinking more and more about productivity solutions, bullet journals, and to do lists. This morning I serendipitously came back across a reply Paul Jacobson made about lab books on a post relating to bullet journals and thought I'd sketch out a few ideas. I like the lab book…
Kathleen did you own the domain where Planned Obsolescence1 was peer-reviewed? It may be one of the first major examples of book-length online academic samizdat of which I'm aware. Perhaps you know of others which could be documented? I suspect we could help provide additional exemplars and links to other web technology, platforms, plugins, etc.…

An Outline for Using Hypothesis for Owning your Annotations and Highlights

I was taken with Ian O'Byrne's righteous excitement in his video the other day over the realization that he could potentially own his online annotations using Hypothesis, that I thought I'd take a moment to outline a few methods I've used. There are certainly variations of ways for attempting to own one's own annotations using Hypothesis…

Some thoughts on highlights and marginalia with examples

Earlier today I created a read post with some highlights and marginalia related to a post by Ian O'Bryne. In addition to posting it and the data for my own purposes, I'm also did it as a manual test of sorts, particularly since it seemed apropos in reply to Ian's particular post. I thought I'd…

A pencast overview (with audio and recorded visual diagrams) of IndieWeb technologies

I've seen a bunch of new folks coming into the IndieWeb community recently who are a bit overwhelmed with the somewhat steep learning curve of both new jargon as well as new ideas and philosophies of what it means to have one's own domain and presence on the internet. While parts of the IndieWeb's overall…

Checkin Maido

Checked into Maido
Found the brush pens and paper I was looking for at Daiso Japan here. Got the last of two different kana notebooks they had in stock. They've got an awesome selection! Possibly even better than what I'd seen on Amazon recently. The clerk said their Alhambra location was even bigger, so I'll have to go…

Reply to a Comment on Supporting Digital Identities in School

Replied to Comment on Supporting Digital Identities in School by Christina Smith (Read Write Respond)
Your post reminded me of a challenge I see every time Couros posts about students having those three aspects of a digital identity: no matter how much we as educators may encourage this, ultimately it is up to the students to make it part of their lives. I have been blogging with my students for some years now, and when it is not a class requirement, they stop posting. I think part of this digital presence that we want students to establish – the \”residency,\” as Robert Schuetz said in the recent blog post that led me here (http://www.rtschuetz.net/2016/02/mapping-our-pangea.html) – is not always happening where we suggest. I know my students have an online presence – but it\’s on Instagram and Snapchat, not the blogsphere. Perhaps instead of dragging kids on vacation to where we think they should set up shop, we need to start following them to their preferred residences and help them turn those into sturdy, worthy places from which to venture out into the world.
This is certainly an intriguing way to look at it, but there's another way to frame it as well. Students are on sites like Instagram and Snapchat because they're connecting with their friends there. I doubt many (any?) are using those platforms for learning or engagement purposes, so attempting to engage with them there may…