Read Mulligan by gRegor MorrillgRegor Morrill (gregorlove.com)
Today wasn’t a great mental health day for me. I felt pretty blah and ended up spending most of the day watching Netflix. It passes the time but it doesn’t really help the mood. I ended up not having any social interaction. Now I have about an hour left to write a post. I’m not really feeling ...

Sorry to hear this gRegor. I know exactly how you feel as I have more days like this than I’d like to admit. I’m around if you need help out of the funk.

👓 Call for help: We need to address suicide risk in autistic women | Spectrum | Autism Research News

Read Call for help: We need to address suicide risk in autistic women by Sara Luterman (Spectrum | Autism Research News)
Researchers need funds to investigate why autistic women take their own lives — and how to stop them.

Alas, I’m reading this article a few weeks too late to have been aware to do so much more for a friend who in retrospect needed far more than I knew to give. I’m both gobsmacked and depressed about these numbers.

I will miss Kim Hansen’s kindness and brilliance.

📑 High Cadence Thoughts | Ryan Dawidjan

Annotated High Cadence Thoughts by Ryan Dawidjan (High Cadence Thoughts)
‪if you’re ever feeling down, just remember that the greatest talents of our time were all once consistently fooled by peek-a-boo   

👓 A Suspense Novelist’s Trail of Deceptions | The New Yorker

Read A Suspense Novelist’s Trail of Deceptions by Ian Parker (newyorker.com)
Dan Mallory, who writes under the name A. J. Finn, went to No. 1 with his début thriller, “The Woman in the Window.” His life contains even stranger twists.

I can certainly identify with a lot of this type of behavior. I suspect there are many in the entertainment sector who do this, or something very close to this.

👓 An Open Letter to the WordPress Community | WP&UP

Read An Open Letter to the WordPress Community (WP&UP)
If you're someone, or you know of someone who has been impacted by mental health illness, then you may find there are aspects of this letter that will be hard to read.

👓 Lifefaker

Read Lifefaker.com makes faking perfection easy (lifefaker.com)
Lifefaker.com is a new tech startup with a mission: to help you fake a perfect social profile, whoever you are. Life isn't perfect, your profile should be.

I once heard someone say “Live an Instagrammable life” by which I think they meant live an impossibly beautiful professionally shot magazine-syled life that will make all your friends jealous.

As a result, I’m thinking about buying the “I Can Be Arty And Deep” package or the “I Own All The Things” package. Maybe both at the same time? They’re so cheap and simple… Surely this will make my life better and happier!

👓 How heavy use of social media is linked to mental illness | The Economist

Read How heavy use of social media is linked to mental illness (The Economist)
Youngsters report problems with anxiety, depression, sleep and “FoMO”

🔖 Want to listen: Jenny Lawson is Very Fond of Creepy Smiling Dead Animals and Worries Quite a Bit | The Hilarious World of Depression | APM Podcasts

Bookmarked Jenny Lawson is Very Fond of Creepy Smiling Dead Animals and Worries Quite a Bit by John Moe (APM Podcasts)

She’s the author of bestselling books and an incredibly popular blog, but Jenny Lawson showed up to our interview wondering, at least a little, if her appearance on this show and her whole career, really, was part of some delusion. It’s not. She’s the real thing: an incredibly funny and honest writer with a legion of fans, a very old decapitated and stuffed boar’s head named James Garfield, anxiety, depression, and a clear-eyed view of the world.



A show about clinical depression...with laughs? Well, yeah. Depression is an incredibly common and isolating disease experienced by millions, yet often stigmatized by society. The Hilarious World of Depression is a series of frank, moving, and, yes, funny conversations with top comedians who have dealt with this disease, hosted by veteran humorist and public radio host John Moe. Join guests such as Maria Bamford, Paul F. Tompkins, Andy Richter, and Jen Kirkman to learn how they’ve dealt with depression and managed to laugh along the way. If you have not met the disease personally, it’s almost certain that someone you know has, whether it’s a friend, family member, colleague, or neighbor. Depression is a vicious cycle of solitude and stigma that leaves people miserable and sometimes dead. Frankly, we’re not going to put up with that anymore.

The Hilarious World of Depression is not medical treatment and should not be seen as a substitute for therapy or medication. But it is a chance to gain some insight, have a few laughs, and realize that people with depression are not alone and that together, we can all feel a bit better.

The Hilarious World of Depression is made possible by a grant from HealthPartners and its Make It OK campaign, which works to reduce the stigma of mental health. Find out more at www.makeitok.org.

h/t Kimberly Hirsch