📺 Won’t You Be My Neighbor? – Official Trailer | Focus Features

Watched Won't You Be My Neighbor? by Focus Features from YouTube
Watch the official trailer for Morgan Neville's new movie, Won't You Be My Neighbor? #MrRogersMovie

From Academy Award® -winning filmmaker Morgan Neville (20 Feet from Stardom), Won’t You Be My Neighbor? takes an intimate look at America’s favorite neighbor: Mister Fred Rogers. A portrait of a man whom we all think we know, this emotional and moving film takes us beyond the zip-up cardigans and the land of make-believe, and into the heart of a creative genius who inspired generations of children with compassion and limitless imagination.

This looks like the type of salve the world could use right about now. I wonder if reruns of his show are available anywhere?

📺 Cobra Kai Trailer Season 1 (2018) Karate Kid Series | YouTube

Watched Cobra Kai Trailer Season 1 (2018) Karate Kid Series by Series Trailer MP from YouTube
Original stars Ralph Macchio and William Zabka are back as karate rivals Daniel LaRusso and Johnny Lawrence, and as the teaser above shows, they’re still nursing wounds from the old days. Johnny is reviving his old dojo Cobra Kai, and Daniel isn’t about to let him without a fight.

This looks like an interesting potential series, but the plot through line of this trailer makes me wonder if they can get to the 3rd episode. Johnny seems to have the more interesting character here. I’m also curious about the financing and set up for this being a YouTube Red series. Could be an interesting move in the streaming video space.

📺 So Much for So Little (1949) | YouTube

Watched So Much for So Little (1949) by Chuck Jones from YouTube
So Much for So Little is a 1949 American short documentary film directed by Chuck Jones. It won an Academy Award in 1950 for Documentary Short Subject, tying with A Chance to Live. The cartoon states that, annually, 118,481 babies out of 2 million will die before reaching their first birthday. Thus, the cartoon shows John E. Jones, a baby that may add to this statistic if not given proper healthcare. The cartoon proceeds to show most of John's life, including his school years, marriage, later life (as a father), and his golden years, providing other helpful health information along the way. Before the cartoon ends, however, it returns to John as a baby, reminding the audience that John needs proper healthcare to survive. The cartoon then states that if every American paid just three cents a week, sufficient healthcare could be provided for John and babies everywhere.

There’s an awful lot of smoking in this PSA for public health! Welcome to 1949!

📺 ポンキッキーズ メロディ「いっぽんでもニンジン」 | YouTube

Watched ポンキッキーズ メロディ「いっぽんでもニンジン」 by FujitvKids from youtube.com
うた:なぎらけんいち 1975年。この年がどんな1年だったかをチェックできるよ!

A bizarre looking number counting video. Reminiscent of 1970’s Sesame Street cartoons or some quirky Russian (80’s?) cartoons I’ve seen.

📺 Make It With Keanu Reeves (Squarespace) | YouTube

Watched Make It With Keanu Reeves by Squarespace from YouTube
When passion meets inspiration, an obsession is born. Hold on to this dream and tell the world. All you need is a domain and a website from Squarespace. The world is waiting. Make it. (Super Bowl LII ad)

A little cheeseball in some sense, but this looks a lot like what generation 3 is looking for product-wise.

📺 The Real Reason We Don’t Hear About Joe Pesci Anymore | YouTube

Watched The Real Reason We Don't Hear About Joe Pesci Anymore by Looper from YouTube
Joe Pesci is one of the all-time great and versatile character actors. He played Jake Lamotta's brother and manager in Raging Bull the psychopathic Tommy DeVito in Goodfellas, and had legendary roles in Home Alone, My Cousin Vinny, and the Lethal Weapon franchise. Pesci was a welcome presence on the big screen for decades who could successfully handle high drama and humor. But lately, we haven't heard much from the Oscar-winner, while his talents have been sorely missed. Here are some of the reasons Joe Pesci's been off the radar in recent years...

Early retirement | 0:34
Just for friends | 1:30
Losing interest | 2:30
Gains and losses | 3:27
The ex-wife, the hitman, and the attorney | 4:21
Time for a comeback? | 5:43

📺 The trick that makes transcribing quick and easy | YouTube

Watched The trick that makes transcribing quick and easy from Quartz | YouTube
Transcribing things sucks. But we have a hack to make transcribing quick and easy–it's also free.

Overview: Use Google Docs with voice record and a pair of headphones.

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📺 Proving Brouwer’s Fixed Point Theorem | PBS Infinite Series on YouTube

Watched Proving Brouwer's Fixed Point Theorem by Tai-Danae Bradley from PBS Infinite Series | YouTube
There is a proof for Brouwer's Fixed Point Theorem that uses a bridge - or portal - between geometry and algebra. Analogous to the relationship between geometry and algebra, there is a mathematical “portal” from a looser version of geometry -- topology -- to a more “sophisticated” version of algebra. This portal can take problems that are very difficult to solve topologically, and recast them in an algebraic light, where the answers may become easier. Written and Hosted by Tai-Danae Bradley; Produced by Rusty Ward; Graphics by Ray Lux; Assistant Editing and Sound Design by Mike Petrow and Meah Denee Barrington; Made by Kornhaber Brown (www.kornhaberbrown.com)

I had originally started following Tai-Danae Bradley on Instagram having found her account via the #math tag. Turns out she’s burning up the world explaining some incredibly deep and complex mathematics in relatively simple terms. If you’re into math and not following her work already, get with the program. She’s awesome!

Personal Website: http://www.math3ma.com/
Twitter: @math3ma
Instagram: @math3ma
YouTube series: PBS Infinite Series

While this particular video leaves out a masters degree’s worth of detail, it does show some incredibly powerful mathematics by analogy. The overall presentation and descriptions are quite solid for leaving out as much as they do. This may be some of the best math-based science communication I’ve seen in quite a while.

I must say that I have to love and laugh at the depth and breadth of the comments on the video too. At best, this particular video, which seems to me to be geared toward high school or early college viewers and math generalists, aims to introduce come general topics and outline an incredibly complex proof in under 9 minutes. People are taking it to task for omitting “too much”! To completely understand and encapsulate the entirety of the topics at hand one would need coursework including a year’s worth of algebra, a year’s worth of topology including some algebraic topology, and a minimum of a few months worth of category theory. Even with all of these, to fill in all the particular details, I could easily see a professor spending an hour at the chalkboard filling in the remainder without any significant handwaving. The beauty of what she’s done is to give a very motivating high level perspective on the topic to get people more interested in these areas and what can be done with them. For the spirit of the piece, one might take her to task a bit for not giving more credit to the role Category Theory is playing in the picture, but then anyone interested is going to spend some time on her blog to fill in a lot of those holes. I’d challenge any of the comments out there to attempt to do what she’s done in under 9 minutes and do it better.

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📺 Introduction to Category Theory 1 by Steven Roman | YouTube

Watched Introduction to Category Theory 1 by Steven Roman from YouTube
Lecture one of six in an introductory set of lectures on category theory.

Take Away from the lecture: Morphisms are just as important as the objects that they morph. Many different types of mathematical constructions are best described using morphisms instead of elements. (This isn’t how things are typically taught however.)

Would have been nice to have some more discussion of the required background for those new to the broader concept. There were a tremendous number of examples from many areas of higher math that many viewers wouldn’t have previously had. I think it’s important for them to know that if they don’t understand a particular example, they can move on without much loss as long as they can attempt to apply the ideas to an area of math they are familiar with. Having at least a background in linear algebra and/or group theory are a reasonable start here.

In some of the intro examples it would have been nice to have seen at least one more fully fleshed out to better demonstrate the point before heading on to the multiple others which encourage the viewer to prove some of the others on their own.

Thanks for these Steven, I hope you keep making more! There’s such a dearth of good advanced math lectures on the web, I hope these encourage others to make some of their own as well.

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📺 Jeremy Keith – Building Blocks of the Indie Web

Bookmarked Building Blocks of the Indie Web by Jeremy Keith (View Source London)
In these times of centralised services like Facebook, Twitter, and Medium, having your own website is downright disruptive. If you care about the longevity of your online presence, independent publishing is the way to go. But how can you get all the benefits of those third-party services while still owning your own data? By using the building blocks of the Indie Web, that's how!

Based solely on what I know from just the title of the talk, this wasn’t quite at all what I was expecting. It was far more interesting and philosophical than I expected, but I suppose that’s the extra magical bit that you get for a something presented by Jeremy.

Approaching the subject from a more architectural standpoint was quite refreshing and a great way to frame the subject for this audience. I found myself wishing he’d had twice the amount of time to expand on his ideas. Often when I’m explaining IndieWeb building blocks, I’ll touch on webmention prior to micropub, but I like the way he turned my usual thinking on it’s head by putting micropub first in his presentation.

Thanks, Jeremy (and Mozilla for the conference). This was great fun! 🎉 ​​​​​

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Energy and Matter at the Origins of Life by Nick Lane | Santa Fe Institute

Bookmarked Energy and Matter at the Origin of Life by Nick Lane (Santa Fe Institute Community Event (YouTube))
All living things are made of cells, and all cells are powered by electrochemical charges across thin lipid membranes — the ‘proton motive force.’ We know how these electrical charges are generated by protein machines at virtually atomic resolution, but we know very little about how membrane bioenergetics first arose. By tracking back cellular evolution to the last universal common ancestor and beyond, scientist Nick Lane argues that geologically sustained electrochemical charges across semiconducting barriers were central to both energy flow and the formation of new organic matter — growth — at the very origin of life. Dr. Lane is a professor of evolutionary biochemistry in the Department of Genetics, Evolution and Environment at University College London. His research focuses on how energy flow constrains evolution from the origin of life to the traits of complex multicellular organisms. He is a co-director of the new Centre for Life’s Origins and Evolution (CLOE) at UCL, and author of four celebrated books on life’s origins and evolution. His work has been recognized by the Biochemical Society Award in 2015 and the Royal Society Michael Faraday Prize in 2016.

h/t Santa Fe Institute

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📺 Don’t Worry Be Happy by Bobby McFerrin

Watched Don't Worry Be Happy from YouTube
Music video by Bobby McFerrin performing Don't Worry Be Happy.

Most will think that Robin Williams’ cameo in this video is the headline, but to me it’s Bill Irwin! I’ve been enamored of his work (and clowning) since watching My Blue Heaven in my youth. There’s nothing better than running into his work anywhere on film and television. I hope he ultimately gets the recognition he deserves for his work, which I think is sadly underrated. If you haven’t seen his Mr. Noodle work, go out and track it all down.

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🎧 Steindór Andersen & Hilmar Örn Hilmarsson | Haustið nálgast on YouTube

Listened to Steindór Andersen & Hilmar Örn Hilmarsson from YouTube
From the album: Stafnbúi Released october 2012, by the icelandic label 12 Tónar Rímur poetry is an important cultural heritage of the Icelandic nation. Stein...

This reminds me a bit of Kongar-ol Ondar from Mongolia, not necessarily in style, but in regional substance.

h/t Vicki Boykis

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📺 The Decentralized Social Web by Keith J. Grant

Bookmarked The Decentralized Social Web by Keith J. Grant (Recall Act)
We tend to have a love/hate relationship with social networks. The ability to interact with friends, colleagues, and even celebrities is wonderful, but the lack of control over privacy or content algorithms is troubling. A better way lies ahead, where you aren't tied to large social networks and where you can own your own data. Recorded at Atlanta Connect.Tech 2017 on 9/21/2017

A few weeks back Keith gave a great non-platform specific overview to some of the moving pieces of the IndieWeb at Connect.Tech 2017 in Atlanta. I wish I could have been there in person, but glad that it was archived on video for posterity.

Somehow I managed to get a mention in his talk as did our friend Jeremy Cherfas.

The slides for his talk are archived, naturally, on his own website.
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📺 These 3D animations could help you finally understand molecular science | PBS NewsHour

Watched These 3D animations could help you finally understand molecular science from PBS NewsHour
Art and science have in some ways always overlapped, with early scientists using illustrations to depict what they saw under the microscope. Janet Iwasa of the University of Utah is trying to re-establish this link to make thorny scientific data and models approachable to the common eye. Iwasa offers her brief but spectacular take on how 3D animation can make molecular science more accessible.

Visualizations can be tremendously valuable. This story reminds me of an Intersession course that Mary Spiro did at Johns Hopkins to help researchers communicate what their research is about as well as some of the work she did with the Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology.

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