👓 How Facebook and Twitter Help Amplify Fringe Websites | Anti-Defamation League

Read How Facebook and Twitter Help Amplify Fringe Websites (Anti-Defamation League)
Extremists are leveraging Facebook and Twitter to ensure that the hateful philosophies that begin to germinate on message boards like Gab and 8chan find a new and much larger audience.

I’ll note here that I’ve noticed that sites like Gab have been working at transitioning into projects like Mastodon as a means of getting around roadblocks related to getting their mobile apps into marketplaces like the Apple and Google app stores.

We need far more tools to help individuals to control the crap that they see on the internet.

👓 Thursday, June 20, 2019 | Scripting News

Read Thursday, June 20, 2019 (Scripting News)
When you buy something online that there is no Consumer Reports or Wirecutter review of, how do you decide what to get? There are a lot of what appear to be review sites on the web, but I guess they're all ads for what they recommend. I don't think the search engines have gotten around to this yet. Here's a search for "best bike cover." Which if any of them are serious criticism by people who know the area.

👓 Blogging As An Act Of Defiance In An Age Of Social Media Manipulation | Steve Lawson

Read Blogging As An Act Of Defiance In An Age Of Social Media Manipulation by Steve Lawson (stevelawson.net)
So this website finally had an 11 year overdue overhaul. Total redesign and optimisation. If you need yours sorting out, talk to Thatch, who did this one – he did such a great job. Have a rummage around to behold the goodness and read all of the words. There’s a bit of me that feels like announc...

👓 Feedless is an iOS content blocker that takes the media out of social media | The Verge

Read Feedless is an iOS content blocker that takes the media out of social media by Casey Newton (The Verge)
It’s the News Feed, minus the news

👓 Decentralized Social Networks Sound Great. Too Bad They’ll Never Work | WIRED

Read Decentralized Social Networks Sound Great. Too Bad They’ll Never Work (WIRED)
Opinion: Facebook and Google's growing power has spurred calls to decentralize the web.

A bit too narrowly focused. They’re not looking at very many examples either. Nor are they taking in the idea that not EVERYTHING needs to be decentralized, just that many could be to create more competition. No mention of IndieWeb efforts here either.

👓 facebook backfeed via email notifications · Issue #854 · snarfed/bridgy | GitHub

Read facebook backfeed via email notifications · Issue #854 · snarfed/bridgy (GitHub)
this is a kinda crazy, somewhat dangerous, generally inadvisable idea that we almost certainly shouldn't do...at least, not as a public facing service for everyone. @chrisaldrich had the ...

👓 The Good Social Internet | Bennett Tomlin

Read The Good Social Internet by Bennett TomlinBennett Tomlin (Bennett's Blog)
Social media often sucks. The social internet is a magical place full of rich relationships, new connections, intriguing ideas, and true community. What do I mean when I say the social internet? It…

Some great little quotes hiding in here:

The simple reason is that the dynamics of most social media are very different from the dynamics of other social internet applications. For one there seems to be a fundamental push vs pull difference in the way that you normally come to view the content.

The internet was on demand, instead of demanding.

👓 Twitter Just Suspended My Account After The Cover Of My Book Offended Their Algorithm | Crooks and Liars

Read Twitter Just Suspended My Account After The Cover Of My Book Offended Their Algorithm (Crooks and Liars)
The cover of my book, Alt-America: The Rise of the Radical Right, is now being equated to actual hate speech that I report on.

👓 The Soothing Promise of Our Own Artisanal Internet | WIRED

Read The Soothing Promise of Our Own Artisanal Internet by Nitasha TikuNitasha Tiku (WIRED)
As unease with Big Tech grows, some prescribe a slower, less viral online existence. "Eat independent sites, mostly not Facebook."

Great overview article on some of the bigger problems. It also has some excellent analogies of the web with the changes in the food movement over the past 30 years or so. Nothing new, but well written and with some great links to pull things together.

Read A Humanities Commons Twitter Conference – 18 July 2019 (conference.hcommons.org)
For the first ever Humanities Commons Twitter conference, we not only want to give our users a space to showcase what they’ve built, but we also want to further explore how Humanities Commons fits within larger conversations of open access scholarship, inclusivity, and scholarly communications.

I’ve put this on my calendar.

👓 Gab Will Become a Mastodon Fork | Michael Tsai

Read Gab Will Become a Mastodon Fork by Michael Tsai (mjtsai.com)
App Review’s previous stated rationale for rejecting the Gab app was that the service didn’t do a good enough job of moderating the user-generated content. Gab claimed that they try their best to do this but that Apple’s requirements are impossible to meet. Clearly, Twitter and other social networks don’t always meet them, either. But Twitter is too-big-to-reject, and Gab has a reputation for offensive content, attracting a community of users that were banned or had their posts deleted from Twitter.

Interesting end-around app stores…

Read Lurking and Social Networks by Ton ZijlstraTon Zijlstra (Interdependent Thoughts)

Lurking, although the word seems to imply a negative connotation, has usefull aspects nonetheless. It is a way of determining rules of behaviour for new comers to a group.
The most obvious characteristic of a lurker is that he’s at the fringe of a group, listening and observing. Being at the fringe may seem like a bad place from the core, but in fact is a good position to build bridges to other groups, and be aware of other groups in the vicinity. In a face to face setting like a pub or a meeting of some kind, a lurker is visible, often shortly introduced after which the focus of attention shifts to the established group members again.
In on-line settings things are different. In some fora lurkers are encouraged to introduce themselves and then adviced to lurk, i.e. observe and learn for a while. But at all times there is no way of knowing how many lurkers are there that you are unaware of.
As lurkers are possible bridges to other groups, I as a blogger, would like to know:

  • How many lurkers I have, who read my blog but don’t comment or post.
  • Who they are
    Serverlogs can give some clues, and I keep a close watch on them. Dave Winer’s RSS-tool also brings new info to light.

network diagram with strong ties and numerous weak ties, preventing echo chambers

network diagram with strong ties and numerous weak ties, preventing echo chambers