👓 Apple is about to do something their programmers definitely don’t want. | Anil Dash

Read Apple is about to do something their programmers definitely don't want. by Anil Dash (Anil Dash)
Apple spent $5 billion on a beautiful new office, Apple Park. So it’s amazing they’re about to make an extremely costly, avoidable mistake: putting their coders in an open-plan layout. I work at Fog Creek Software, where our cofounder and former CEO Joel Spolsky has been blogging for
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👓 Linux 4.19-rc4 released, an apology, and a maintainership note | Linus Torvalds

Read Linux 4.19-rc4 released, an apology, and a maintainership note by Linus Torvalds (lore.kernel.org)
This is my reality. I am not an emotionally empathetic kind of person and that probably doesn't come as a big surprise to anybody. Least of all me. The fact that I then misread people and don't realize (for years) how badly I've judged a situation and contributed to an unprofessional environment is not good.
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👓 The debt metaphor in software development | Andy Sylvester

Read The debt metaphor in software development by Andy Sylvester (andysylvester.com)
In a new post, Ward Cunningham shares his thoughts on the “debt metaphor” in software development. One of the points he brings out is that programming can be thought of as making decisions now on the functionality of the program and deferring others to a later time (debt), with the understanding...
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👓 What Did Ada Lovelace’s Program Actually Do? | Two Bit History

Read What Did Ada Lovelace's Program Actually Do? (twobithistory.org)
In 1843, Ada Lovelace published the first nontrivial program. How did it work?

Interesting that he indicates what may have been one of the first published computer code bugs.

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👓 The Joel Test: 12 Steps to Better Code | Joel Spolsky

Read The Joel Test: 12 Steps to Better Code by Joel Spolsky (Joel on Software)
Have you ever heard of SEMA? It’s a fairly esoteric system for measuring how good a software team is. No, wait! Don’t follow that link! It will take you about six years just to understa…

Some good solid advice. It’s difficult to imagine a time when a lot of this wasn’t commonplace. Note the publication date of 08/09/2000! This was almost exactly 18 years to the day from today.

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👓 Posting Source Code | Support — WordPress.com

Read Posting Source Code (WordPress Support)
While WordPress.com doesn’t allow you to use potentially dangerous code on your blog, you can post source code for viewing by using the directions found in this support doc.

I’d wondered before how to better display code on my website. This article has a link to an excellent plugin on WordPress.org for doing it and even better, it also syndicates across to my mirrored site on WordPress.com well.

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👓 Relicensing React, Jest, Flow, and Immutable.js | Facebook

Read Relicensing React, Jest, Flow, and Immutable.js by Adam Wolff (Facebook)
Next week, we are going to relicense our open source projects React, Jest, Flow, and Immutable.js under the MIT license. We're relicensing these projects because React is the foundation of a broad ecosystem of open source software for the web, and we don't want to hold back forward progress for nontechnical reasons. This decision comes after several weeks of disappointment and uncertainty for our community. Although we still believe our BSD + Patents license provides some benefits to users of our projects, we acknowledge that we failed to decisively convince this community.

This won’t bode well for large portions of the web…

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👓 Is there any value in people who cannot write JavaScript? | Medium

Read Is there any value in people who cannot write JavaScript? by Mandy Michael (Medium)
I recently had the opportunity to speak at Web Directions Code 2017 over in Melbourne. While there, I was part of a panel with Mark Dalgleish and Glen Maddern (who gave spectacular talks I might add). We’d just finished a set of talks about CSS, and during the panel we got a question along the lines of (paraphrasing): “Is there a place in the industry for people who just write css and html” To me, this could easily be interpreted as, “Is there any value in people who cannot write JavaScript?”, based on some comments from the audience after, this seemed to be how many understood question. So, we asked the audience if they hire people who just write CSS and HTML. No-one put their hand up. And I, for one, was disappointed.
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👓 Why Are Coding Bootcamps Going Out of Business? | Hack Education

Read Why Are Coding Bootcamps Going Out of Business? by Audrey Watters
Within the past week, two well-known and well-established coding bootcamps have announced they’ll be closing their doors: Dev Bootcamp, owned by Kaplan Inc., and The Iron Yard, owned by the Apollo Education Group (parent company of the University of Phoenix). Two closures might not make a trend… yet. But some industry observers have suggested we might see more “consolidation” in the coming months.

Some great observations on non-profit vs. for-profit educational institutions and the social inequality that exists between the two.

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👓 Petition to Re-License React has been Escalated to Facebook’s Engineering Directors | WP Tavern

Read Petition to Re-License React has been Escalated to Facebook’s Engineering Directors by Sarah Gooding (WP Tavern)
React users are petitioning Facebook to re-license React.js after the Apache Software Foundation announced its decision to ban Apache PMC members from using any technology licensed with Facebook’s BSD+Patents License. So far the GitHub issue has received 627 “thumbs up” emoji and 66 comments from concerned React users who are hoping for a change in licensing. Many respondents on the thread said that ASF’s decision affects their organizations’ ability to continue using React in projects. “Apache CouchDB and others will switch away from React if we have to,” CouchDB committer Robert Newson said. “We’d rather not, it’s a lot of work for no real gain, but we don’t have a choice. Changing license can be simple (RocksDB completed that change in a day).”
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👓 Developers Who Use Spaces Make More Money Than Those Who Use Tabs | Stack Overflow Blog

Read Developers Who Use Spaces Make More Money Than Those Who Use Tabs by D Robinson (Stack Overflow Blog)
Do you use tabs or spaces for code indentation?
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🎧 Containers Episode 7: The Lost Docks

Listened to Containers Episode 7: The Lost Docks from Containers
It’s 1979 and containerization is sweeping through the San Francisco waterfront, leaving the old docks in ruins. As global trade explodes, a group of longshoremen band together to try to preserve the culture of work that they knew. They take pictures, create a slide show, and make sound recordings. Those recordings languished in a basement for 40 years. In this episode, we hear those archival tapes as a way of exploring the human effects of automation.

A nice bit on the human side of shipping, and in particular how things have changed for longshoremen.

As I listen to this and some of the culture discussed in the episode, I can’t help but wonder about how things change for the modern-day versions of longshoremen. So for example, a lot of programmers have some of this type of culture. I’ll admit it’s early days right now, but what happens to the class of programmers now fifty years on? Could make an interesting plot for a sci-fi story?

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📖 Read pages 86 – 116 of 776 of Learning PHP, MySQL & JavaScript with JQUERY, CSS & HTML5 by Robin Nixon

📖 Read pages 86 – 116 of 776 of Learning PHP, MySQL & JavaScript with JQUERY, CSS & HTML5 by Robin Nixon

Plowing along through the PHP section
Continue reading “📖 Read pages 86 – 116 of 776 of Learning PHP, MySQL & JavaScript with JQUERY, CSS & HTML5 by Robin Nixon”

📖 Read pages 55 – 86 of 776 of Learning PHP, MySQL & JavaScript with JQUERY, CSS & HTML5 by Robin Nixon

📖 Read pages 55 – 86 of 776 of Learning PHP, MySQL & JavaScript with JQUERY, CSS & HTML5 by Robin Nixon

I’ve been promising myself that I would do some brushing up on programming skills this year and this seems like a fairly reasonable text with some simple examples.

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