A Digital Food Diary on My Own Website

Food and Drink on my own website

I’ve been wanting to do it for a while, but I’ve finally started making eat and drink posts. The display isn’t exactly what I want yet, but it’s getting there. For myself and those reading, I’ll try to continue tweaking on templates, but with the start of the new year, I wanted to at least start capturing the basic data. Most of the heavy lifting will be done by David Shanske’s excellent Post Kinds Plugin.

I’m hoping that, much like the dieting advice about getting and using a clean plate for every single thing you eat, consciously posting will help me to subconsciously eat better too. I’ve already begun to notice some of the subtle effects, and not just for composing better photographs of my food.

I probably won’t post everything publicly after some time because, really, who really wants to see all this (perhaps aside from others interested in doing the same thing themselves)? Eventually it’ll probably devolve into only the more fabulous looking restaurant meals and specialty cocktails while I’m out.

🍴 Ham sandwich with muenster on rye, strawberries, oatmeal and raisin cookie with Coca-cola zero sugar

Since the ham sandwich post is so vaunted and maligned in the social media space and I can more properly support it, I’ve already made my obligatory first personal ham sandwich post.

Previous Food related posts on Silos

Back in the day, I’d used services like Eat.ly and Foodspotting. The former was bought out by the latter and development and customer acquisition seems to have died altogether. These did a reasonable job of melding eating and checkin post types, but the genre seems to have died out for lack of interest and or development. Since some of what they did was interesting and useful to me, I’m recreating portions of it on my own site.

Courtesy of David’s Simple Location Plugin, I’ll also be able to add location data to my eating-related posts to also make them checkins in a sense much like some of the functionality of these older silos.

I did like some of the health related and calorie data that Eat.ly made possible, and might consider adding some of that into my site in the future as well. I’ll have to take a look at services like WeightWatchers that I would expect might add that type of functionality as well. This also reminds me that Leo Laporte has a wi-fi scale that Tweets out his weight every time he stands on it. That sounds like useful quantified self data, though I don’t think I’d go so far as to post it publicly on my site (or syndicate it) in the future.

Feeds for these posts

I can’t imagine that anyone but potential stalkers would care, but for posterity, here are the feeds associated with these posts:
Eat: http://www.boffosocko.com/kind/eat/feed/
Drink: http://www.boffosocko.com/kind/eat/feed/
Eat & Drink (combined): http://www.boffosocko.com/feed/?kind=eat,drink

If you’re subscribed to my full feed and don’t want these in it, it’s possible to redact these posts from your stream, just drop me a line and I can help you subscribe to just the content you desire. Those subscribed to the “Food” category needn’t worry as I don’t expect to be clogging that category up with these posts.

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The Bread Baker’s Apprentice, 15th Anniversary Edition: Mastering the Art of Extraordinary Bread by Peter Reinhart

The Bread Baker's Apprentice, 15th Anniversary Edition: Mastering the Art of Extraordinary Bread: Peter Reinhart: 9781607748656: Amazon.com: Books by Peter ReinhartPeter Reinhart (Tenspeed Press)
Co-founder of the legendary Brother Juniper’s Bakery, author of ten landmark bread books, and distinguished instructor at the world’s largest culinary academy, Peter Reinhart has been a leader in America’s artisanal bread movement for more than thirty years. Never one to be content with yesterday’s baking triumph, however, Peter continues to refine his recipes and techniques in his never-ending quest for extraordinary bread. In this new edition of the award-winning and best-selling The Bread Baker’s Apprentice, Peter shares bread breakthroughs arising from his study in France’s famed boulangeries and the always-enlightening time spent in the culinary college kitchen with his students. Peer over Peter’s shoulder as he learns from Paris’s most esteemed bakers, like Lionel Poilâne and Phillippe Gosselin, whose pain à l’ancienne has revolutionized the art of baguette making. Then stand alongside his students in the kitchen as Peter teaches the classic twelve stages of building bread, his clear instructions accompanied by more than 100 step-by-step photographs. You’ll put newfound knowledge into practice with fifty master formulas for such classic breads as rustic ciabatta, hearty pain de campagne, old-school New York bagels, and the book’s Holy Grail—Peter’s version of the famed pain à l’ancienne, as well as three all-new formulas. En route, Peter distills hard science, advanced techniques, and food history into a remarkably accessible and engaging resource that is as rich and multitextured as the loaves you’ll turn out. In this revised edition, he adds metrics and temperature conversion charts, incorporates comprehensive baker’s percentages into the recipes, and updates methods throughout. This is original food writing at its most captivating, teaching at its most inspired and inspiring—and the rewards are some of the best breads under the sun.
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️ Modernist Bread by Nathan Myhrvold, Francisco Migoya

Modernist Bread (The Cooking Lab)
Modernist Bread: The Art and Science is a revolutionary new understanding of one of the most important staples of the human diet. Created by the team that published the award-winning Modernist Cuisine: The Art and Science of Cooking, this massive treasury of practical knowledge and groundbreaking techniques captures over four years of independent research and collaborations with leading industry professionals; the result is the most in-depth look at bread to date. Stunning photography brings the complete story of bread to life across five volumes—uncover its incredible history, loaves from every corner of the world, and the breath-taking beauty of scientific phenomena at work above and below the crust. In addition, you will discover innovative recipes and techniques developed by the Modernist Cuisine team that have not been published anywhere else. Housed in a sleek stainless steel case, this five-volume set contains more than 1,500 traditional and avant-garde recipes, as well as a wire-bound kitchen manual so that you can easily bring all of the recipes into the kitchen in one compact collection. Spanning over 2,300 pages, Modernist Bread will become an invaluable resource for anyone who has a thirst for knowledge about bread or wants to advance their craft. This book is a call to arms for any baker—whether you are a strict traditionalist, avid modernist, home baker, restaurant chef, or an artisanal baker—to embrace the possibilities of invention and follow your inspiration to make breads in your own way. The Modernist Cuisine team is an interdisciplinary group in Bellevue, Washington, founded by Nathan Myhrvold. The team comprises scientists, research and development chefs, a full editorial and photography department, and business and marketing staff—all dedicated to advancing the science of the culinary arts through creativity and experimentation.

I thought McGee’s 60 page synopsis of milk was interesting, but how is this to compare to a $520.00 treatise on bread that spans over 2,600 pages?

I’m thinking this would be an awesome Christmas present!! Hint, Hint

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Modernist Bread Crumbs

Modernist BreadCrumbs (Heritage Radio Network)
Modernist Cuisine founder Nathan Myhrvold and head chef Francisco Migoya join Michael Harlan Turkell on Modernist BreadCrumbs, a special series taking a new look at one of the oldest staples of the human diet: bread. Each episode explores bread from a different angle; from its surprising and often complicated past, to the grains, tools, and microbes we use to make it, and the science behind every loaf. The show looks at the discoveries and techniques from Modernist Bread, as well as interviews with the scientists and bakers who are shaping the future of bread.

Subscribing to/following this. Looks interesting. Jeremy Cherfas may appreciate both it and the entire network itself if he hasn’t heard of them before.

Can’t wait to start listening to episodes.

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👓 ‘How dare they’: Nutella changes recipe, sending its fans to the edge | Washington Post

‘How dare they’: Nutella changes recipe, sending its fans to the edge by Travis M. Andrews (Washington Post)
A legion of snackers live for the hazelnut spread. And they're not happy.

Some interesting food history here that I didn’t know about.

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👓 Resistance is fudgeable | Jeremy Cherfas

Resistance is fudgeable by Jeremy CherfasJeremy Cherfas (jeremycherfas.net)
Editing the recent podcast on Antibiotics in agriculture was far harder than I expected it to be, mostly because I had to cut away stuff that is important, but just didn’t fit. Much of that was about how, in time honoured tradition, antibiotic manufacturers and veterinarians sowed doubts about who...

I love that Jeremy goes to the effort to not only analyze the charts and graphs, but finds original copies and brings them to our attention. Too often people would look at such things and take them at face value.

This is definitely a podcast “extra”, but I’m glad he spent the time to bring up the other interesting topics that didn’t make the original episode.

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Checkin Carmela Ice Cream & Sorbet

Carmela Ice Cream & Sorbet

Stupidly expensive ice cream, but it’s awesome. Pumpkin spice is particularly good.

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🎧 Getting to know the cinta senese on its home turf | Eat This Podcast

Getting to know the cinta senese on its home turf: The rebirth of a Renaissance pig by Jeremy Cherfas from Eat This Podcast
In the town hall of Siena is a series of glorious frescoes that depict The Allegory of Good and Bad Government. In one of them is a pig, long snouted and thin legged, black with a white band around its back and down its front legs, being quietly chivied along by a swineherd. It is absolutely recognisable as a cinta senese, a Belted Sienese pig, today one the most favoured heritage breeds in Italy. But it wasn’t always so. Numbers dropped precipitously in the 1950s and 1960s, to the point that the herd studbook, recording the ancestry of all the animals, was abandoned. And then began the renaissance. One place that contributed to the revival of the cinta senese is Spannocchia, a large and ancient estate not far from Siena. I was lucky enough to visit earlier this summer, to see the pigs first hand and to learn about them from Sara Silvestri. Perhaps the biggest surprise, to me, was that not all cinta senese are blessed with the white belt that is deemed a characteristic of the breed. Some have white spots or stripes but not the full band, and some don’t seem to have any white at all. This could be flaky genetics – odd for a breed with a supposedly ancient lineage – or it could be the result of marauding male cinghiale, which are a problem in Spannocchia and elsewhere. Right now, all these visually defective animals (and most of the perfect specimens too) end up on a plate. I wonder how long before every piglet born is properly belted.

Oh, how I dream of pork… I’m beginning to wonder if there’s an Eat This Podcast 12 step program.

For a minute toward the end I though that Jeremy had slipped and let the audio quality of the episode go to pot. Took me a minute to realize that it had started to rain during the interview and the audio was really just supplementing the arc of the story–as always. I suppose I have to let go and trust his producerial sense.

I’d been away from podcasts for a chunk of the summer, so today was a great day to have the chance to catch up on one of my favorites.

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📺 Food Waste: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)

Food Waste: Last Week Tonight from HBO
Producers, sellers, and consumers waste tons of food. John Oliver discusses the shocking amount of food we don’t eat.

This episode dispels a lot of common misconceptions about food and food donations in the United States.

Some of the potential legislation discussed here could be tremendously helpful not only to a lot of Americans, but to other countries as well. I find it difficult to believe that legislators work on a bunch of knucklehead things when “simple” things like this are left to fester away. Not only could it help out millions of people, but could create jobs, and drastically effect world efficiency as well as improve the economy.

If Jeremy Cherfas, hasn’t seen this, I highly recommend it. Perhaps a more in-dept episode of Eat This Podcast on the numbers, policy decisions and science?

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