🎧 The Problem with the Solution | Invisibilia (NPR)

The Problem with the Solution by Lulu Miller and Alix Spiegel from Invisibilia | NPR.org
We are naturally drawn to finding solutions. But are there ever problems we shouldn't try to solve? Lulu Miller visits a town in Belgium with a completely different approach to dealing with mental illness. Families in the town board people – strangers - with severe mental illnesses in their homes, sometimes for decades. And it works, because they are not looking to cure them.

A stunning idea, and one that could do well not only for the mentally ill among our friends and families, but some interesting psychology for parenting and expectations of parents for their children.

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🎧 The Personality Myth | Invisibilia (NPR)

The Personality Myth by Lulu Miller and Alix Spiegel from Invisibilia | NPR.org
We like to think of our own personalities - and those of our spouses, children and friends - as predictable and constant over time. But what if they aren't? In this episode, Alix Spiegel visits a prison to explore whether there is such a thing as a stable personality. And Lulu Miller asks whether scientists can point to a single thing about a person that doesn't change over time. The answer might surprise you.

Not explicitly said, but this episode points out the heavy nurture side of the nature/nurture question in relation to the stability of one’s personality over time. In some sense, you are who those around you expect you to be. This also makes me think I ought to go back to working for a larger company with more people around me.

Yet another great episode, though to me not as intriguing as some of their other prior efforts. Still overall, a stellar podcast series.

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🎧 Under the Radar 65: Getting Sherlocked | Under the Radar

Under the Radar 65: Getting Sherlocked by Marco Arment and David Smith from overcast.fm
Preparing for and reacting to Apple implementing your app’s core functionality themselves.

Upshot: Cover the 3 sigma edge cases that the bigger corporation won’t bother to support.

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🎧 Our Computers, Ourselves | Invisibilia (NPR)

Our Computers, Ourselves by Lulu Miller and Alix Spiegel from Invisibilia | NPR.org
In Our Computers, Ourselves, a look at the ways technology affects us, and the main question is : Are computers changing human character? You'll hear from cyborgs, bullies, neuroscientists and police chiefs about whether our closeness with computers is changing us as a species.

Possibly not as interesting to me because I’ve watched this space more closely over the past 20 years or so. Still it’s an interesting episode asking some great questions.

I can’t believe I flew through season one so quickly.

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🎧 The Power Of Categories | Invisibilia (NPR)

The Power Of Categories by Lulu Miller and Alix Spiegel from Invisibilia | NPR.org
The Power Of Categories examines how categories define us — how, if given a chance, humans will jump into one category or another. People need them, want them. The show looks at what categories provide for us, and you'll hear about a person caught between categories in a way that will surprise you. Plus, a trip to a retirement community designed to help seniors revisit a long-missed category.

The transgender/sexual dysphoria story here is exceedingly interesting because it could potentially have some clues to how those pieces of biology work and what shifts things in one direction or another. How is that spectrum created/defined? A few dozen individuals like that could help provide an answer.

The story about the Indian retirement community in Florida is interesting, but it also raises the (unasked, in the episode at least) question of the detriment it can do to a group of people to be lead by some the oldest members of their community. The Latin words senīlis ‎(“of or pertaining to old age”) and senex ‎(“old”) are the roots of words like senate, senescence, senility, senior, and seniority, and though it’s nice to take care of our elders, the younger generations should take a hard look at the unintended consequences which may stem from this.

In some sense I’m also reminded about Thomas Kuhn’s book The Structure of Scientific Revolutions and why progress in science (and yes, society) is held back by the older generations who are still holding onto outdated models. Though simultaneously, they do provide some useful “brakes” on both velocity of change as well as potential ill effects which could be damaging in short timeframes.

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🎧 Entanglement | Invisibilia (NPR)

Entanglement by Lulu Miller and Alix Spiegel from Invisibilia | NPR.org
In Entanglement, you'll meet a woman with Mirror Touch Synesthesia who can physically feel what she sees others feeling. And an exploration of the ways in which all of us are connected — more literally than you might realize. The hour will start with physics and end with a conversation with comedian Maria Bamford and her mother. They discuss what it's like to be entangled through impersonation.

I can think of a few specific quirks I’ve got that touch tangentially on mirror synethesia. This story and some of the research behind it is truly fascinating. Particularly interesting are the ideas of the contagion of emotion. It would be interesting to take some complexity and network theory and add some mathematical models to see how this might look. In particular the recent political protests in the U.S. might make great models. This also makes me wonder where Donald Trump sits on this emotional empathy spectrum, if at all.

One of the more interesting take-aways: the thoughts and emotions of those around you can affect you far more than you imagine.

Four episodes in and this podcast is still impossibly awesome. I don’t know if I’ve had so many thought changing ideas since I read David Christian’s book Maps of Time: An Introduction to Big History[1] The sad problem is that I’m listening to them at a far faster pace than they could ever continue to produce them.

References

[1]
D. Christian, Maps of Time: An Introduction to Big History. Univ of California Press, 2004.
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🎧 How to Become Batman | Invisibilia (NPR)

How to Become Batman by Lulu Miller and Alix Spiegel from Invisibilia | NPR.org
In "How to Become Batman," Alix and Lulu examine the surprising effect that our expectations can have on the people around us. You'll hear how people's expectations can influence how well a rat runs a maze. Plus, the story of a man who is blind and says expectations have helped him see. Yes. See. This journey is not without skeptics.

Expectations are much more important than we think.

Is it possible that this podcast is getting more interesting as it continues along?! In three episodes, I’ve gone from fan to fanboy.

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🎧 Fearless | Invisibilia (NPR)

Fearless by Lulu Miller and Alix Spiegel from Invisibilia | NPR.org
In "Fearless," co-hosts Alix Spiegel and Lulu Miller explore what would happen if you could disappear fear. A group of scientists believe that people no longer need fear — at least not the kind we live with — to navigate the modern world. We'll hear about the striking (and rare) case of a woman with no fear. The second half of the show explores how the rest of us might "turn off" fear.

Our evolution certainly hasn’t been keeping up with our level of fear in the modern world. Even simple things like kids playing around their own neighborhood like I did as a kid in the 70’s and 80’s has changed drastically. How can we keep ourselves from being held back unnecessarily?

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This Week in Google 387: Mommy’s Special Shawl

This Week in Google 387: Mommy's Special Shawl by Leo Laporte, Stacey Higginbotham from twit.tv
Stacey's LONG list of great IoT gadgets at CES. The Ara modular smartphone's rise and fall. The death of Google Hangouts API. WayMo makes LIDAR way cheaper. Marissa Mayer to leave Yahoo after sale. Bogus "inventor of e-mail" sues Techdirt. Aaron's Thing: The Onion Omega2 Stacey's Do Buy: truMedic Instashiatsu Plus Neck and Shoulder Massager Stacey's Don't Buy: GE Z-Wave Wireless Smart Door Sensor Leo's Thing: Project Fi - A World of Thanks

🎧 India’s bread landscape and my plans here | Eat This Podcast

India’s bread landscape and my plans here by Jeremy Cherfas from Eat This Podcast
I’ve hinted before that I’d like to do more constructed shows here, where I speak to a few different people about a topic to try and get a broader sense of the subject. They’re harder to do, but more rewarding, and they consistently get more listeners. The problem is that as a one-man band, I don’t have the time I need to do that kind of show very often. As an experiment, I’m going to try chunking episodes into seasons, with a break between seasons when I’ll be working on those more complex shows. I’m not sure yet how long either the seasons or the breaks will be.
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This Week in Google 386: You Got Something Jammed in There Good

This Week in Google 386: You Got Something Jammed in There Good by Leo Laporte, Jeff Jarvis from twit.tv
How targeted ads on Google and Facebook are affecting politics and destroying mass media. CES 2017: Alexa everywhere, Samsung's Chromebook Pro, Asus ZenFones, and Qualcomm's Snapdragon 835. Google Home's New Year Resolutions. Jeff's Number: Celebrity Telethon on Facebook Live vs. Trump inauguration Mathew's Stuff: From Tape Drives to Memory Orbs, the Data Formats of Star Wars Suck (Spoilers) Leo's Tool: Pre-register Super Mario Run for Android

This Week in Google 384: Schmoopie

This Week in Google 384: Schmoopie by Leo Laporte, Jeff Jarvis, Stacey Higginbotham from twit.tv
What the world searched for in 2016, Mark Zuckerberg's AI home assistant sounds like Morgan Freeman, fake news, Uber loses $3 billion, Tom Wheeler quits the FCC, Waymo minivans. Stacey's Thing: Canary Flex Jeff's Number: $250 million home for tech in NYC Leo's Tool: Netgear Orbi

This Week in Google 383: The Spectacles Spectacular

This Week in Google 383: The Spectacles Spectacular by Leo Laporte, Jeff Jarvis, Stacey Higginbotham from twit.tv
Trump meets with tech leaders. Yahoo reveals a new hack of 1 billion accounts. Google's self-driving division is now a new Alphabet company called Waymo. Google Assistant will add Actions on Google. Android Things, Google's IoT platform, gets a developer preview. Is Magic Leap a hoax?