👓 Marie Kondo v. Tsundoku: Competing Japanese Philosophies on Whether to Keep or Discard Unread Books | Open Culture

Read Marie Kondo v. Tsundoku: Competing Japanese Philosophies on Whether to Keep or Discard Unread Books (Open Culture)
By now we've all heard of Marie Kondo, the Japanese home-organization guru whose book The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up became an international bestseller in 2011.

Having minimized many of the things in my life, I’ll say that getting rid of books was something I just couldn’t bring myself to do either.

📺 “Madam Secretary” Family Separation: Part 2 | CBS

Watched "Madam Secretary" Family Separation: Part 2 from CBS
Directed by Martha Mitchell. With Téa Leoni, Tim Daly, Keith Carradine, Patina Miller. Elizabeth goes head to head with a U.S. governor over the state's new policy of separating unauthorized immigrants from their children.

Not as powerful as part 1, but still interesting.

📺 “Madam Secretary” Family Separation: Part 1 | CBS

Watched "Madam Secretary" Family Separation: Part 1 from CBS
Directed by Rob Greenlea. With Téa Leoni, Tim Daly, Keith Carradine, Patina Miller. Elizabeth goes head to head with a U.S. governor over the state's new policy of separating unauthorized immigrants from their children.

A gut-wrenching episode to be sure. It took me several attempts to make it through. Definitely an example where art has a place in helping to shape and change our lives.

📑 Blind Person-Tagging | Kicks Condor

Annotated Blind Person-Tagging by Kicks Condor (kickscondor.com)

Unlinked mentions…? What if you had an individual who was the subject of the text, but you didn’t want to notify them? You may want to include an unlinked @boffosocko, to refer to someone without summoning them. But—what if you wanted to link readers to the person without notifying them?  

I thought about this case in the not-so-recent-past and came up with the possibility of creating a “submention” similar to the idea of a subtweet. If you scroll down on that particular post, you’ll see a response from Colin Walker about actually implementing it, which he implemented as a nomention plugin for WordPress.

Of course doing things this way doesn’t necessarily prevent the person from possibly seeing it through the natural course of events, others notifying them directly (snitch-tagging), or even the use of things like refbacks, which would send them notifications anyway. And then there’s Voldemorting

👓 Blind Person-Tagging | Kicks Condor

Read Blind Person-Tagging by Kicks Condor (kickscondor.com)
I’m getting a lot out of these ruminations you’re doing about links as notifications. For me, I think I’m going to include a ‘cc’ bit of post metadata, much like I already have ‘via’ metadata, to advertise the original source for a bit of hypertext. Cool idea. The idea of a ‘bcc’ i...

📺 "Blue Bloods" Milestones | CBS

Watched "Blue Bloods" Milestones from CBS

Directed by Heather Cappiello, Jonathan Lopez. With Donnie Wahlberg, Bridget Moynahan, Will Estes, Len Cariou. After a former officer waits on Frank at a restaurant, he feels guilty about the circumstances surrounding why she was fired, and he tries to reinstate her.

Danny Reagan and Maria Baez standing in some bleachers during an investigation

I’ll agree: Passive Tracking > Active Tracking

It’s always nice if you can provide real-time active tracking and posting on your own website, but is it really necessary? Is it always worthwhile? What value does it provide to you? to others?

The other day I read Eddie Hinkle’s article Passive Tracking > Active Tracking in which he details how he either actively or passively tracks on his own website things he’s listening to or watching. I thought I’d take a moment to scribble out some of my thoughts and process for how and why I do what I’m doing on my own site.

I too track a lot of things relatively passively. Most of it I do for my own “diary” or commonplace book. Typically I’ll start out using silo services that have either RSS feeds or that work with services like IFTTT.com or Zapier. If those don’t exist, I’ll just use the ubiquitous “share” functionality of nearly all web pages and mobile platforms to share the content or page via email which I can use to post to my website as well. The primary minimal data points I’m looking for are the title of the specific thing I’m capturing (the movie, tv show/episode title, book title, article title, podcast title) and the date/time stamp at which the activity was done.

I’ll use these to take input data and transfer it to my own website, typically in draft form. In many cases, these methods collect all the data I want and put it into a format for immediate sharing. Other times I’ll clean up some bits of the data (almost always context related, so things like images, summaries, the source of the data, etc.) a bit before sharing. Then I optionally decide to post it either publicly or privately on my site.

Some of the sources I use for pulling in data (especially for context) to my website include:
 Watches: IMDb.com, Letterboxd, TheTVDB.com, themoviedb.org, direct websites for shows/movies themselves
 Listens: typically using share functionality via email from my podcatcher; Spotify, Last.fm,
 Reads: reading.am, Pocket, Hypothes.is, GoodReads, 
 Bookmarks: diigo, Hypothes.is, Twitter, Pocket

Often, going the route of least resistance for doing this sort of tracking is a useful thing to find out if doing so is ultimately useful or valuable to you. If it’s not, then building some massive edifice and code base for doing so may be additional sunk cost to find out that you don’t find it valuable or fulfilling somehow. This is primary value of the idea “manual until it hurts.”

I will note that though I do have the ability to do quick posting to my site using bookmarklets in conjunction with the Post Kinds Plugin for WordPress, more often than not, I find that interrupting my personal life and those around me to post this way seems a bit rude. For things like listen posts, logging them actively could a be a life threatening endeavor because I most often listen while driving. Thus I prefer to take a moment or two to more subtly mark what I want to post and then handle the rest at a more quiet and convenient time. I’ll use down time while passively watching television or listening to music to do this sort of clean up. Often, particularly for bookmarks and annotations, this also forces me to have a second bite at the proverbial apple to either follow up on the bookmarked idea or think about and reflect on the thing I’ve saved. In some sense this follow up is way more valuable to me than having actively posted it and then simply moving on. It also becomes a way for what might otherwise be considered “digital exhaust” to give me some additional value.

Eventually having better active ways to track and post these things in real time would be nice, but the marginal additional value just hasn’t seemed to be there for me. If it were, there are also larger hurdles of doing these posts quickly and in a way that pulls in the context portions I’d like to present. Adding context also generally means having solid pre-existing data bases of information from which to poll from, and often these can be difficult to come by or require API access to something. As a result services like Swarm and OwnYourSwarm are useful as they can not only speed up the process of logging data, but they are underpinned with relatively solid databases. As an example, I frequently can’t use IMDB.com to log in television shows like Meet the Press or Face the Nation because entries and data for those particular episodes often don’t exist even when I’m watching them several hours after they’ve aired. And even in these cases the websites for these shows often don’t yet have photos, synopses, video, or transcripts posted when I’m watching them. Thus posting for these in real-time the way I’d like becomes a much more difficult nightmare and requires a lot more manual effort.

Update:

As a follow up to Eddie’s post (which doesn’t yet show the Webmention), I’ll also point out that Jonathan has an excellent description and some code for what he’s doing on his site as well.

🎧 “The Daily”: A Dispatch From the Center of the Storm | New York Times

Listened to "The Daily": A Dispatch From the Center of the Storm from New York Times

As Hurricane Florence descended on a 300-year-old coastal town, it became clear to residents that this storm would be unlike any other in memory.

🎧 “The Daily”: Who’s Allowed to Vote in Georgia? | New York Times

Listened to "The Daily": Who’s Allowed to Vote in Georgia? from New York Times

Accusations of intentional voter suppression have animated the state’s crucial race for governor.

👓 Nobody Is Moving Our Cheese: American Surplus Reaches Record High | NPR

Read Nobody Is Moving Our Cheese: American Surplus Reaches Record High by Samantha Raphelson (NPR)

It's a stinky time for the American cheese industry.

While Americans consumed nearly 37 pounds per capita in 2017, it was not enough to reduce the country's 1.4 billion-pound cheese surplus, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The glut, which at 900,000 cubic yards is the largest in U.S. history, means that there is enough cheese sitting in cold storage to wrap around the U.S. Capitol.

The stockpile started to build several years ago, in large part because the pace of milk production began to exceed the rates of consumption, says Andrew Novakovic, professor of agricultural economics at Cornell University.

@manton, I’m not sure if anyone would have thought to ask or do such a thing, but does micro.blog provide users any feeds (RSS, JSON, etc.) of the sites the’re subscribed to for reading in a reader that isn’t necessarily micro.blog’s primary interface?

I ask because I’m curious about the ease of maintaining contacts if one wanted a different reader experience, were to leave micro.blog, or simply wanted to transfer from following 100s within micro.blog to follow them using other interfaces?

Any thoughts perhaps of providing an exportable OPML file for making functionality like this easier? Or for taking an OPML file and putting it into a feed reader that supports subscribing to OPML files?

👓 The 7 Characteristics That Can Make A Link “Bad” For SEO | Search Engine Land

Read The 7 Characteristics That Can Make A Link "Bad" For SEO (Search Engine Land)
Search Engine Land is the leading industry source for daily, must-read news and in-depth analysis about search engine technology.