Read Digital Citizenship, Again, Always by Chris Lott (fncll.org)

Summer is here and, with it, I again have the privilege of teaching a grad class with the (mouthful of) a title “Digital Citizenship, Intellectual Property, and Internet Legal Issues” AKA “Nousion” because…shorter titles FTW. It’s a small class (12-weeks, a half-dozen students) about big ideas. Any one of the clauses in the title could be a semester-long class, a PhD dissertation, or a book!

But we start with digital citizenship because, as problematic as the concept is, I think it works to have everything else in the course be part, or a function of, it. And the questions there are perennial:

  • What does the word “digital” mean and do here?
  • What is citizenship?
  • How do we live and work online, individually and together?
  • Where does digital literacy fit?
  • What about identity?
  • What about privacy?
  • Whose data?

You get the idea. I love exploring this topic every summer with a cohort of engaged students even if by the end of each term the most important lesson I’ve learned is just how much more I don’t know and if the only answers to those questions are more questions.

Read 10 Things That Scare Me by Chris Lott (Chris Lott)

One of my favorite new podcasts is WNYC’s 10 Things That Scare Me, a “tiny podcast about our biggest fears.” The premise is simple: someone (the guests, sometimes famous, often anonymous, are unidentified until the end of the show) shares—directly into the mic—ten things that scare them, each with little bit of narrative.

Sometimes funny, sometimes harrowing, mostly brutally honest…there’s just something beautiful in the simplicity of this direct sharing of fears. To get a taste, here’s a random sample of fears from recent episodes:

  • climate change
  • the marionette in my mom’s bedroom
  • my Google search history being made public
  • becoming irrelevant
  • hospitals
  • breathing tubes
  • being shot by law enforcement.

Also, the relatively lo-fi (but very much intentionally so) format and editing fit the idea perfectly.

Best listened to without looking at the title of the show which, unfortunately, gives away the guest’s identity.

👓 Does the news reflect what we die from? | Our World in Data

Read Does the news reflect what we die from? (Our World in Data)
There is a large disconnect between what gets covered in the media and the day-to-day reality for most. How do causes of death in the US match with media coverage and what people search for online?

Some interesting ethical and moral questions here relating to public health and how it’s covered in the media.

This could be a nice interview segment for On the Media.

👓 Man Still Without Tow Truck After Repossessing NYPD Officer's Car | NY1

Read Man Still Without Tow Truck After Repossessing NYPD Officer's Car (ny1.com)
Rodriguez is due back in court June 26.

I would think the mayor’s office and internal affairs would be all over this…

👓 Why Women, but Not Men, Are Judged for a Messy House | New York Times

Read Why Women, but Not Men, Are Judged for a Messy House (New York Times)
They’re still held to a higher social standard, which explains why they’re doing so much housework, studies show.

👓 Craft beautiful equations in Word with LaTeX | Nature

Read Craft beautiful equations in Word with LaTeX (Nature)
Manufacturers are ditching equation editors in word-processing software in favour of the LaTeX typesetting language. Here’s how to get started.

👓 Domains19 Reflection, Well Really More of A Thanks. | EconProph | Jim Luke

Read Domains19 Reflection, Well Really More of A Thanks. by Jim Luke (EconProph)
I just got back from the Domains19 conference and some thanks and perhaps observations are in order. It was a very interesting, stimulating, and useful conference. Frankly, I’ve come to expec…

👓 Reflections on Domains 19 | John Stewart

Read Reflections on Domains 19 by John StewartJohn Stewart (johnastewart.org)
Domains19 wrapped yesterday, and it was great. Lauren and the whole Reclaim Hosting team did a great job putting the conference together. As with any good conference, my favorite part was getting to catch up with friends and meet people who’s work I’ve been following for a while (I was particularly excited to meet Martin Hawksey and experience Bryan Ollendyke’s bombastic manifesto of a talk).

👓 Curating the Micro.blog Discover Timeline | Jean MacDonald

Read Curating the Micro.blog Discover Timeline by Jean MacDonaldJean MacDonald (micro.welltempered.net)
Micro.blog is a blogging platform with a social engagement component. We have a timeline where you can follow and interact with other bloggers. Sometimes it feels like Twitter, because of the timeline, mentions, and conversations. But there are key differences, built into Micro.blog, to make it a sa...

👓 #Domains19 Reflections | Lee Skallerup Bessette

Read #Domains19 Reflections by Lee Skallerup Bessette (readywriting)
A little more than 4 years ago, I was at #dlrn15 hearing Jim Groom talk about Domain of One's Own, and Eddie Maloney talking the graduate degree they were developing, the one that would become the MA in Learning, Design, and Technology. I was about to start at UMW, and

👓 The Pac-Man Rule at Conferences | Eric Holscher

Read The Pac-Man Rule at Conferences by Eric Holscher (ericholscher.com)

The rule is:

When standing as a group of people, always leave room for 1 person to join your group.

More memorably, stand like Pac-Man!

../../../../../_images/pacman.png

The new person, who has been given permission to join your group, will gather up the courage, and join you! Another important point, the group should now readjust to leave another space for a new person.

Leaving room for new people when standing in a group is a physical way to show an inclusive and welcoming environment. It reduces the feeling of there being cliques, and allows people to integrate themselves into the community.

I’ve always instinctively done this at networking events; it’s great to have a good name for it.

Hat tip: Kevin Marks who linked to