Read Collaborative Community Review on PubPub by Heather Staines

In preparation for Peer Review Week, I wanted to take a closer look at some of the collaborative community review experiments that have happened recently on PubPub. Finding new ways to harness engagement in scholarly communications is a goal of the Knowledge Futures Group, and inline annotation is a technology that I rely upon every day to organize my thoughts and track my online reading. I reached out to the authors of three forthcoming MIT Press books that have undergone this type of review during the last year. I was excited to learn about their experiences and to share some of their observations here.

A short text “interview” with the authors of three works that posted versions of their books online for an open review via annotation.

These could be added to the example and experience of Kathleen Fitzpatrick.

“Criticism is a marker of respect and an acknowledgement that others see in us the ability to learn.” they noted. 

quote from Catherine D’Ignazio, Assistant Professor, Emerson College, and Lauren Klein, Associate Professor, Georgia Institute of Technology, authors of Data Feminism.
Annotated on June 21, 2021 at 07:57AM

He notes that authors of such projects should consider the return on investment. It take time to go through community feedback, so one needs to determine whether the pay off will be worthwhile. Nevertheless, if his next work is suitable for community review, he’d like to do it again. 

This is an apropos question. It is also somewhat contingent on what sort of platform the author “owns” to be able to do outreach and drive readers and participation.
Annotated on June 21, 2021 at 05:12PM

Read Making Our Mark: 2021 Innovator in Residence to Focus on Creative Notetaking (The Library of Congress)
The strike-throughs, underlines, doodles, and marginalia made by historical figures in their personal papers at the Library of Congress give researchers a more intimate sense of who they were. These markings sometimes shed light on the story of how a work was made or received. Researchers can understand more about the creative process, opinions and musings of people throughout the centuries by understanding these historical markings that are often, literally and figuratively, in the margins. Artist and educator Courtney McClellan is inspired by this tradition of mark-making, and today the Library of Congress announced her appointment as 2021 Innovator in Residence.McClellan’s project, Speculative Annotation, will invite Americans to join this historical lineage of annotators by creatively engaging with a curated collection of free to use items from the
I Annotate 2021 in I Annotate 2021 | Program ()

Bookmarked on 2021-06-20 at 7:19 PM; Read on 2021-06-21 at 5:22 PM

doodles 

aka drolleries

Annotated on June 21, 2021 at 05:19PM

These markings sometimes shed light on the story of how a work was made or received. Researchers can understand more about the creative process, opinions and musings of people throughout the centuries by understanding these historical markings that are often, literally and figuratively, in the margins. 

In addition to looking in the margins, one must also look at contemporaneous copies of both printed and privately held (or collected) commonplace books to cast a wider net on these practices.

Annotated on June 21, 2021 at 05:21PM

The project will be available in summer 2021 on labs.loc.gov. 

Return to this project in July 2021 to see it in action.

Annotated on June 21, 2021 at 05:22PM

Read On Privilege & Sharing Power by Maha BaliMaha Bali (Reflecting Allowed)
Multi-USB/Plug power hub Power strip/hub that I use when I need to work outside the house I have a personal experience that I think can be used as a metaphor for privilege and power, but I need to brush up on my reading on power. All I remember from readings back during my PhD, was there are multipl...
Read A Year in Marginalia by Sam Anderson (The Millions)
The writing I enjoy doing most, every year, is marginalia: spontaneous bursts of pure, private response to whatever book happens to be in front of me. It’s the most intimate, complete, and honest form of criticism possible — not the big wide-angle aerial shot you get from an official review essay, but a moment-by-moment record of what a book actually feels like to the actively reading brain. 
This is a phenomenal way to do a look back at a year in reading. I’ll have to consider how to pull it off for myself this year.
 
Read Social Media Isn’t Going to Save You From Social Media (KIRISKA)
Everyone has a bone to pick with existing social networks. There are plenty of legitimate concerns, but the fact is that social media has also been incredibly valuable for many people. If your business depends in large part on connecting with others or engaging with an audience, it’s hard to simpl...
The heading really says it all.
 
I’ve been spitballing with a few people about how to create alternate funding ideas including making smaller community-centric hubs and infrastructure to both center the smaller interactions as well as help create healthier funding centers for our technology. Smaller local news outlets and libraries are better places for these spaces to stem from in my opinion. Setting up these structures isn’t easy (or cheap) however.
 
As for the confusion on the IndieWeb pieces, you’re not wrong. The community knows this is an issue and is slowly, but surely working on it. Naturally it’s a slow process because it’s all volunteer driven, but we’ll get there.
Read Obsidian Release v0.12.2 (Obsidian Forum)
Shiny new things Command palette can now be configured to have “pinned” commands that appear at the top. Obsidian Publish now has a search filter in the upload dialog. Improvements Obsidian Sync no longer runs into a possible race condition which sometimes causes file to be recognized as deleted. This has only been observed happening on Obsidian Mobile so far. Vastly improved Obsidian Sync boot up speed. It will now also avoid re-scans of attachments when they haven’t been changed. Obsidian S...
Read Obsidian Release v0.12.1 (Obsidian Forum)
Improvements On initial loading of the vault, the cache indexing notification will now contain the indexing progress. Improvements to the font size adjustment annoyance: Ctrl+Scroll now only activates if you hold Ctrl before starting to scroll. This option can also now be disabled in Settings > Appearance. No longer broken Obsidian Sync: setting custom device names now persists properly. Obsidian Sync: viewing version history of images and other media files no longer freeze the app trying...
Read Obsidian Release v0.12.0 (Obsidian Forum)
Shiny new things You can now search for tasks using task: similar to block:. There is also task-todo: and task-done: which will match only the tasks that are incomplete or complete, respectively. Use task:"" to match all tasks. Search and backlink results has been significantly reworked: Search results are now always expanded, instead of showing “… and x more matches”. “Show more context” will now show the markdown block, instead of a fixed number of lines before and after the match. There are...

Task lists [x] can now contain any character to indicate a completed task, instead of just x. This value can be used by custom CSS to change the appearance of the check mark, and is also available for plugins to use.

I’ll need to create some custom CSS for these in the past as I’ve used:
* - [>] to indicate that an item was pushed forward
* - [?] to indicate something I’m not sure was done in retrospect (typically for a particular day)
* - [~] to indicate something that didn’t occur, but is “done” anyway
* others?
Annotated on May 20, 2021 at 01:00PM

You can now search for tasks using task: similar to block:. There is also task-todo: and task-done: which will match only the tasks that are incomplete or complete, respectively. Use task:"" to match all tasks.

This will be incredibly useful to create as a view.
Annotated on May 20, 2021 at 01:03PM

Read Letter received from tomaw. by Andrew Lee (realrasengan)Andrew Lee (realrasengan) (Gist)
Hey Andrew. I’ve now been able to speak to Christel about your lawyer's letter and to get legal advice on it. I should say that the reason for taking legal advice was not because I want to have a dispute with you, but because I simply did not know what to do when I got your letter – I have no experience with these things personally, having never received anything like a lawyer’s letter before.
Keep in mind that this may not be the actual email as received. It likely is, but since it’s posted by a third party in a contentious situation, chances are that it may not be.
Read freenode now belongs to Andrew Lee, and I'm leaving for a new network. (kline.sh)
A previous copy of this was a draft. This one isn't - its the real thing. Some time ago, Christel, the former head of freenode staff sold `freenode ltd` (a holding company) to a third party, Andrew Lee[1], under terms that were not disclosed to the staff body. It turns out that this contract did indeed intend to sell the entire network and it's holdings, a fact hidden from the of staff. Mr Lee at the time had promised to never exercise any operational control over freenode. In the past few weeks, we began to realise this had changed[2][3], and Mr Lee has sought to assert total legal control over the network, including user data. Despite our best efforts, the legal advice the freenode staff has obtained is that the contract signed by the previous head of staff cannot be fought with a reasonable likelyhood of success. As a result, Mr Lee will shortly have operational control over the freenode IRC network. I cannot stand by such a (hostile[4]) takeover of the freenode network, and I am resigning along with most other freenode staff. We know that many of our users and communities also do not want this, as you have made clear directly to Mr Lee in and through letters[5].
Read Annotation by chrisaldrich@hypothes.is on Letter to freenode (Hypothes.is)

Posted on Freenode Limited on the morning of May 12, 2021 US PST: 

For context, here’s the other side: https://gist.github.com/joepie91/df80d8d36cd9d1bde46ba018af497409
Annotated on May 20, 2021 at 09:12AM

I simply want freenode to keep on being a great IRC network, and to support it financially and legally as I have for a long time now. 

Simply?

What’s the long term plan/goal here in owning and controlling it? If it’ out of the goodness of your heart, why not set up a foundation and donate the money to that? Why need/have corporate ownership or control unless there’s some other motivation?
Annotated on May 20, 2021 at 09:11AM