👓 #EDU 522 Daily Update: RSS and WordPress | Greg McVerry

Replied to #EDU 522 Daily Update: RSS and WordPress by Greg McVerryGreg McVerry (jgregorymcverry.com)
Hello in today’s first daily update I wanted to share about RSS if you wanted a little background here you go:
My feeds for the class would be:

I don’t have everyone in it yet, but I’ve started an OPML file for the class that one could use to subscribe to in Inoreader. Otherwise you can save the file (typically with the extension .xml) and upload it into the reader of your choice, however you’ll need to come back and get updates as I add new feeds. If you’d like me to add you to the list, drop your details into the comments as you’d like them to appear on my Following Page or send my original post a webmention from your site.

An image to represent how I feel

Replied to a post by Greg McVerry (INTERTEXTrEVOLUTION)

Here is today’s 7/31 yesterday folks were asked to share an image to describe how you felt. Most of you chose a meme. Today we repeat the task but I ask you think metaphorically.

Watch this https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uJUYSdEdWBg and install the Flickr Creative Commons attribution tool. Then find an image to represent how you feel.

X2 MacBuck multiplier if you share your image with correct attribution

Headshot of a pig with a muddy snout sitting in a mud pond
Pig in shit(happy as) flickr photo by Liquid emulsion shared under a Creative Commons (BY-NC-ND) license

I tried to find a photo of a pig without the ear tags, as I suspect it would have been happier to know it’s not being tracked. I suspect it’s difficult not to be tracked, so we’ll have to live with it at least temporarily…

How I feel about the start of #edu522, a class about pedagogy, the web, and IndieWeb

Replied to a post by Greg Mcverry (INTERTEXTrEVOLUTION)
Today’s rings of such simplicity it could not be more complex. Find an image that represents how you feel about this class. Share from your blog. X2 MacBuck multiplier if you provide attribution.

How I feel about the start of , a class about pedagogy, the web, and IndieWeb

Image courtesy of imgflip.com meme generator

Some thoughts on silos, divisions, and bridges

Replied to a tweet by Cruce SaundersCruce Saunders (Twitter)
The #IndieWeb community has been working on this for a while. There’s even a service called Brid.gy to help enact it. At the same time, as Ben Werdmüller indicates, we need to be careful not to put too much reliance on silos’ APIs which can, and obviously will, be pulled out from underneath us at any moment.

As any kindergartner can tell you, “It’s difficult to play ball when the local bully owns the ball and wants to make up their own rules or leave in a huff.”

One of the things I love about IndieWeb is that we’re all trying to create a way for balls to be roughly standardized and mass manufactured so that everyone can play regardless of what the bully wants to do or what equipment people bring to the game.1

And as Nikhil Sonnad has reminded us very recently, we also need more than just connections, we need actual caring and thinking human interaction.2

References

1.
Aldrich C. Webmentions: Enabling Better Communication on the Internet. A List Apart. https://alistapart.com/article/webmentions-enabling-better-communication-on-the-internet. Published July 19, 2018. Accessed July 31, 2018.
2.
Sonnad N. Everything bad about Facebook is bad for the same reason. Quartz. https://qz.com/1342757/everything-bad-about-facebook-is-bad-for-the-same-reason/. Published July 30, 2018. Accessed July 31, 2018.

Reply to actualham on Koch and education

Replied to a tweet by Robin DeRosaRobin DeRosa (Twitter)
Given the statement he makes I honestly wonder if he’s considered taking Malcolm Gladwell’s advice about where to best focus his money for the best outcome based on statistical mechanics–particularly given his stated background?

https://boffosocko.com/2018/05/01/episode-06-my-little-hundred-million-revisionist-history/

Reply to Greg McVerry on changing themes from GitHub

Replied to a post by Greg McVerryGreg McVerry (INTERTEXTrEVOLUTION)
Just updated @dshanske 2016-IndieWeb theme, didn’t use GitHub plugin, will be too hard for students, instead it was backup, switch themes, go into file manager>wpcontent>themes and delete, then reupload, activate. If you want autoupdates use SemPress but it wasn’t bad
Might be easier for them to do it through the admin ui located at /wp-admin/themes.php

  1. Change temporarily to another theme
  2. Delete old version of theme by clicking on it and then clicking on delete in the bottom right corner of the pop-up/modal
  3. Click Add New button at top
  4. Click Upload Theme button
  5. Select and upload the .zip file they downloaded from GitHub (or other location)
  6. Activate the updated theme

Fortunately needing to update themes doesn’t happen often. If you’re using a GitHub theme then be sure to “watch” the repository on GitHub and enable email notifications for it so that you’ll see any future updates, issues, or ongoing work to know about needing to update in the future.

Hint: this workflow could also be used to upload the theme from an external source in the first place.

Reply to Brad Enslen about The Future of Blog Snoop

Replied to Memo: Announcement: The Future of Blog Snoop Blog Directory by Brad EnslenBrad Enslen (Brad Enslen)
I’m hitting a fork in the road with this site and the experiment of using a blog as a directory of blogs.  The problem here is me: I’m running out of time.  I’m duplicating a lot … Source: Announcement: The Future of Blog Snoop – Blog Snoop Weblog Directory We’ll see what happens.  It...
Brad, much like Kicks Condor, I think you’re making a laudable effort, and one of the ways our work grows is to both keep up with it and experiment around.

If I recall, programming wasn’t necessarily your strong suit, but like many in the IndieWeb will say: “Manual until it hurts!” By doing things manually, you’ll more easily figure out what might work and what might not, and then when you’ve found the thing that does, then you spend some time programming it to automate the whole thing to make it easier. It’s quite similar to designing a college campus: let the students walk around naturally for a bit then pave the natural walkways that they’ve created. This means you won’t have both the nicely grided and unused sidewalks in addition to the ugly grass-less beaten paths. It’s also the broader generalization of paving the cow paths.

In addition to my Following page I’ve also been doing some experimenting with following posts using the Post Kinds Plugin. It is definitely a lot more manual than I’d like it to be. It does help to have made a bookmarklet to more quickly create follow posts, but until I’ve got it to a place that I really want it, it’s not (yet) worth automating taking the data from those follow posts to dump them into my Follow page for output there as well. Of course the fact that my follow posts have h-entry and h-feed mark up means that someone might also decide to build a parser that will extract my posts into a feed which could then be plugged into something else like a microsub-based reader so that I could make a follow post on my own site and the source is automatically added to my subscription list in my reader automatically.

In addition to Kicks Condor, I’me seeing others start to kick the tires of these things as well. David Shanske recently wrote Brainstorming on Implementing Vouch, Following, and Blogrolls, but I think he’s got a lot more going on in his thinking than he’s indicated in his post which barely scratches the surface.

I also still often think back to a post from Dave Winer in 2016: Are you ready to share your OPML? This too has some experimental discovery features that only scratch the surface of the adjacent possible.

And of course just yesterday, Kevin Marks (previously of Technorati) reminded us about rel=”directory” which could have some interesting implications for discovery and following. Think for a bit of how one might build a decentralized Technorati or something along the lines of Ryan Barrett’s indie map.

As things continue to grow, I’m seeing some of all of our decisions and experiments begin to effect others as these are all functionality and discovery mechanisms that we’ll all need in the very near future. I hope you’ll continue to experiment and make cow paths that can eventually be paved.

Featured Image: Cows on the path flickr photo by Reading Tom shared under a Creative Commons (BY) license

Reply to Kevin Marks et al on Webmention and Annotations

Replied to a tweet by Kevin Marks (Twitter)
@dangillmore, @froomkin and other journos have played around with @hypothes_is (which has private group functionality):

@dwhly et al have started discussing adding webmentions as well:

There’s also a lot of potential useful overlap of the broader area of IndieWeb technologies with journalism I think.

Replied to user-secret.svg replacing default avatar? · Issue #178 · pfefferle/wordpress-semantic-linkbacks (GitHub)
While I don't mind that this plugin offers its own avatar for unassigned gravatar photos, I wish it would present me the option to choose it on wp-admin/options-discussion.php under Default Avatar. With the latest update, all my default avatars are being overridden with user-secret.svg.
In version 3.8.1 it currently appears that comments from WordPress and Micro.blog (both of which have Gravatar as a commonality) appear to be automatically using the default mystery person avatar even though there is a separate avatar defined within the Avatar fields for Semantic Linkbacks Data.

If I add my my email address within the comment editing interface, then the appropriate Gravatar is pulled and displayed as expected. This leads me to believe that somehow SL either isn’t finding/pulling the Gravatar URL that it’s storing, or the code is potentially skipping looking for it within its logic structure.

I’ve noticed this also seems to be the case for other WP sites which I have reason to suspect are running this same version as well.

Webmentions from other non-Gravatar related sites don’t seem to be affected by this and they’re displaying the proper avatar images as defined within their h-cards.

Reply to Morten Rand-Hendriksen about Webmention and WordPress Core

Replied to a tweet by Morten Rand-HendriksenMorten Rand-Hendriksen (Twitter)
Mathias Pfefferle, David Shanske, and 700+ others have been self-dogfooding Webmention for a while. Feel free to join us in the IndieWeb #WordPress chat to talk about some remaining work and support it might require to do so.

 

👓 How to pack your library: A guide | Chris Adami

Replied to How to pack your library: A guide by Chris AdamiChris Adami (Spherical Harmonics)
That's right folks, this is not a science post. After 45 posts about information, quanta, intelligence, and what not, a how-to guide? Well I only have one blog, and I didn't know where to put this stuff, that I think could be helpful to others, because I've done this several times and I learned a bunch. So now you get to read about how to move your library of precious books from one house to another.
I like your method and did much the same myself this past September. The smallest “book box” one can find is certainly the key.

One thing you’re missing, at least in several of the photographs, that would help for both general shelf wear as well as for packing/moving is to have all of your dust jackets covered with book jacket covers. This will help protect your dust jackets from wear and tear and help increase their long term value, particularly for rarer first editions.

I notice that some of your collection likely already has these, à la the Heinlein, though it’s obvious in that case that a book seller likely jacketed it far too late to protect the pristine original. At least it’s protected from further future wear. If you think it’s worth the time and protection, it may be a worthwhile thing to do when you’re unpacking and reshelving them on the other end.

Brodart is one of the larger sellers of dust jacket covers and they make a huge variety of shapes, sizes, and types. I’ve found that their Advantage I covers are pretty solid and versatile for most of the book sizes you’ve got. Though fair warning: you can go down the rabbit hole and lose a few hours researching dust cover materials and archival types. In the end you want to look for something that covers the jacket, but doesn’t stick to it. This will allow you to replace the jacket cover with a new one if necessary without causing damage to the dust jacket itself.

Reply to Greg McVerry about #IndieWebEdu

Replied to a post by Greg McVerryGreg McVerry (jgregorymcverry.com)
@kfitz Realized I can just use the list here to make my #IndieWebEdu feed: https://indieweb.org/Indieweb_for_Education Its okay about iOS..nobody is perfect.
For fun and not to need to reinvent the wheel:

My following page may have other feeds of interest as well.

📑 Connections by Kathleen Fitzpatrick — A reply to heatherstains annotation

Replied to an annotation on Connections by Kathleen Fitzpatrick by Heather StainesHeather Staines (Hypothesis)
Social media networks provided immediate solutions to a few problems with those early blogging networks: they relieved the moderately heavy lift in getting started and they created the possibility of connections that were immediate, dense, and growing. But as those networks expanded, they both pulled authors away from their own domains — so much quicker to tweet than to blog, and with a much speedier potential response — and they privatized and scattered conversations.  
Exactly the use case that annotation is hoping to solve! Enabling the connection between different sites.
While I’m pondering on this, I can’t help but feel like your annotation here is somewhat meant as a reply to Kathleen. I’m left searching to see if you tweeted it with an @mention to notify her. Otherwise, your annotation seems like a cry into the void, which I’ve happened to come across.

I say this because I know that her website now supports sending and receiving Webmentions (she notes as much and references a recent article I wrote on the topic within her text.) If Hypothes.is supported sending Webmentions (a W3C recommendation) for highlights and other annotations on the page they occurred on, then the author of the post would get a notification and could potentially show it on the site (as an inline annotation) or in their comment section, which might also in turn encourage others to open up the annotation layer to do the same. Hypothesis could then not only be an annotation system, but also serve as an ad hoc commenting/conversation tool as well.

You may notice in her comment section that there are 60+ reactions/comments on her site. One or two are done within her native comment interface, and one directly from my website, but the majority are comments, likes, reshares, and mentions which are coming from Twitter by webmention. Imagine if many of them were coming from Hypothesis instead… (try clicking on one of the “@ twitter.com” links following one of the commenter’s avatars and names. What if some of those links looked like:

instead?

📑 Connections by Kathleen Fitzpatrick — A reply to heatherstains annotation

Replied to an annotation on Connections by Kathleen Fitzpatrick by Heather StainesHeather Staines (Hypothesis)
Social media networks provided immediate solutions to a few problems with those early blogging networks: they relieved the moderately heavy lift in getting started and they created the possibility of connections that were immediate, dense, and growing. But as those networks expanded, they both pulled authors away from their own domains — so much quicker to tweet than to blog, and with a much speedier potential response — and they privatized and scattered conversations.  
Exactly the use case that annotation is hoping to solve! Enabling the connection between different sites.
I do like the way Hypothes.is works, but I still think that a direct site to site version of conversation is still more powerful and both ends get to keep the data rather than relying on a third party. 😉

Reply to Taylor Jadin about podcasting networks

Replied to a tweet by Taylor JadinTaylor Jadin (Twitter)
Taylor, If it helps a bit, Manton Reece [(@manton), (@manton)] fairly recently created a microcast network and some tools to help people create, host, and distribute short podcasts with micro.blog. It’s an interesting model and one which could eventually be built upon as a minimal product for adding additional features and tools.

Additionally Aaron Parecki had some thoughts a while back on his microcast (episode 9: Streamlining My Microcast Workflow) about improving his production workflow. Earlier today he also created a discovery website (with subtle hints of a webring) that acts as a discovery mechanism and network of sorts for microcasts which you might find interesting in light of your plans.

I might also submit that if you’re doing it for students, starting with small, short microcasts are always a quick way to get started.

All this to remind me that I just got a Yeti Blue for my birthday and I need to fire it up to continue on with both my microcast and my longer format podcast.