👓 Hopkins faculty promote better climate in machine learning | Hopkins CSW

Read Hopkins faculty promote better climate in machine learning (Women Faculty Forum at Homewood)
Today, 122 Hopkins faculty, post-docs, and grad students make a call to promote welcoming environments for women at machine learning conferences. In recognition of egregious behavior at recent conf…

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https://hopkinscsw.wordpress.com/2018/03/30/hopkins-faculty-promote-better-climate-in-machine-learning/

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👓 Johns Hopkins University Names Medical Building After Henrietta Lacks | Huffington Post

Read Johns Hopkins University Names Medical Building After Henrietta Lacks (HuffPost)
In the early 1950s, the university's hospital stole cells from Lacks, who has been called the "mother of modern medicine."
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👓 A message from President Daniels to students on the humanities | Johns Hopkins

Read A message from President Daniels to students on the humanities (The Hub | Johns Hopkins)
President Daniels: 'Hopkins believes in the essential value of humanistic inquiry and its capacity to aid you in realizing your aspirations and building lives you want to live and of which you will be proud'
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👓 Old School: Torpor and Stupor at Johns Hopkins | 3quarksdaily

Read Old School: Torpor and Stupor at Johns Hopkins by Bill Benzon (3quarksdaily.com)

Also known as Tottle and Stutter. But the real name was Tudor and Stuart: The Tudor and Stuart Club.

The Tudor and Stuart Club was a literary society at The Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore – yes, they insist upon that “the” before “Johns” – and I was the club secretary for several years back in the late 1960s and 1970s. I don’t know just how that honor came to me. But I’d taken many literature courses as an undergraduate, half of them or so with (the now legendary) Richard Macksey and the others with members of the English Department: Earl Wasserman, Donald Howard, D. C. Allen, and J. Hillis Miller. They must have decided that I had a future as a literary critic and so deserved this honor, though, naturally, it came trailing a few pedestrian duties. I was pleased. I’m pretty sure it was Dick Macksey who told me.

This seems like a solid story from the late 60’s/early 70’s for inclusion into the pantheon at Hopkins Retrospective.

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👓 Pioneering scientist Murray Sachs, who led biomedical engineering at Johns Hopkins for 16 years, dies at 77 | JHU Hub

Read Pioneering scientist Murray Sachs, who led biomedical engineering at Johns Hopkins for 16 years, dies at 77 by Vanessa Wasta (The Hub)
His research on how the brain receives, processes sound paved the way for the development of cochlear implants
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👓 ‘Miss Minnie,’ one of Johns Hopkins University’s longest-serving employees, dies at 96 | JHU Hub

Read 'Miss Minnie,' one of Johns Hopkins University's longest-serving employees, dies at 96 (The Hub)
She came to Hopkins as a cafeteria worker in 1946, retired as assistant to the president in 2007
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Gary Posner obituary

Bookmarked Renowned chemist, longtime Hopkins faculty member Gary Posner dies at 74 (The Hub (JHU))
Gary Posner, best known for pioneering research in organocopper chemistry, joined JHU faculty in 1969

I should know better about searching for obituaries. After hearing about Murray Sach’s passing I’ve just discovered that one of my organic chemistry professors has recently died as well.

I remember Dr. Posner well for his pointed use of the Socratic method, and in particular the day that my chemistry-related sir name caught his eye. I think he always expected that I would have been born a chemistry genius because of the name Aldrich. His expectations did make my orgo studies all the more fraught and worthwhile however.

I will point out in my day that the reaction that carried his name was ordered as the Corey-Posner-Whitesides-House reaction and not in the lesser order mentioned in the article.

Murray Sachs Obituary

Bookmarked Murray Sachs Obituary - Brookline, MA (Dignity Memorial)
Murray Sachs, of Arlington, MA, formerly of Baltimore, MD, on Saturday, March 3, 2018. Beloved husband of the late Merle (Diener) Sachs. Devoted father of Benjamin Sachs & his wife Lisa, and Jonathan Sachs & his wife Kate. Loving grandfather of Talia, Aviva, Zoe, Zander, Jonah, and Miriam. Loving uncle of Nancy Colier and Steven Shainberg. Murray was a renowned scientist who received his undergraduate and graduate degrees in electrical engineering from MIT (B.S. ’62, M.S. ‘64, Ph.D. ‘66). He worked in the field of biomedical engineering, in particular using mathematics to model the way sound is received, transmitted, encoded, and comprehended between the ear and the brain, laying groundwork for advances such as the cochlear implant. He served as the Director of the Biomedical Engineering Department at Johns Hopkins University. Murray was elected a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences, and a member of the National Academy of Engineering for his scientific contributions and his leadership in biomedical engineering education. Murray is remembered as having a gentle soul, and as being a calm leader and generous mentor. He was a loving husband, beloved father, doting grandfather, and a deeply devoted colleague and friend. He will be profoundly missed. Services at Temple Beth Avodah, 45 Puddingstone Lane, Newton, MA on Monday, March 5 at 2pm. In lieu of flowers, remembrances may be made to Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research.

Saddened to hear about the passing of one of my college professors and a lion in the field of biomedical engineering. I’ve heard that there are forthcoming obituaries in the JHU Hub as well as the Baltimore Sun.

h/t to Guy Shechter for passing along the news

Following Johns Hopkins’ High School Film Contest & Festival

Followed Johns Hopkins’ High School Film Contest & Festival (https://krieger.jhu.edu/film-media/)
Johns Hopkins University's High School Film Contest and Festival is designed to showcase and reward the most exciting and remarkable work by high school filmmakers from around the USA and around the world. Only high school students under the age of 18 may submit work to this contest and festival. We are committed to finding the filmmakers of tomorrow, today, bringing them to Baltimore, and showcasing their work at the historic Parkway Theatre. We offer prizes for Grand Prize, Best Documentary Short, Best Narrative Short, Best Comedic Short, Best Dramatic Short, and Best Experimental Short. We also offer a Best Maryland-Made Short prize, a prize for Best Short With a Budget under $250, and a cash Audience Choice Prize. We also offer free workshops with industry professionals during the festival. Submit today!
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👓 Shriver Hall renovation expands to include more enhancements—and a longer timeline | The Hub

Read Shriver Hall renovation expands to include more enhancements—and a longer timeline by Dennis O'Shea (The Hub)
Homewood campus performance space now expected to reopen in early 2019 with improved sound system, seating, and much more. The Shriver Hall renovation project, now slated for completion in early 2019, includes replacing the auditorium’s uncomfortable and often broken seating. Seat removal took place in the fall.

A few years ago they actually took out the awesome sound system because it didn’t “fit in” with the new orchestra shell and handicapped elevator access to the stage that the HSO felt made it too “cramped”. I have no expectation that this will make it a better place for film screenings. I’m also sure the seating capacity will be far less than it was before. Alas…

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👓 After review, closure of Johns Hopkins Humanities Center ‘will not be considered’ | Hub

Read After review, closure of Johns Hopkins Humanities Center 'will not be considered' (The Hub)
Committee recommends three possible paths forward for 50-year-old academic center

Glad to hear this may have a happier ending that I had suspected. I remember a conversation several years ago in which Dick Macksey was reticent to retire because it might have adverse effects on the department. I hope to see his legacy and that of the humanities at Hopkins continue unabated.

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👓 Investor Bill Miller commits $75 million to Johns Hopkins Philosophy Department | JHU Hub

Read Investor Bill Miller commits $75 million to Johns Hopkins Philosophy Department by Dennis O'Shea (The Hub (Johns Hopkins))
Legendary investor William H. "Bill" Miller III has committed a record $75 million to the Johns Hopkins University Department of Philosophy to broaden and intensify faculty research, graduate student support, and undergraduate study of philosophical thought.

Support for the humanities like this is definitely a worthy cause!

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👓 Johns Hopkins astrophysicist Charles Bennett shares $3M Breakthrough Prize | Hub

Read Johns Hopkins astrophysicist Charles Bennett shares $3M Breakthrough Prize (The Hub)
He and his team are recognized for groundbreaking WMAP space mission, which established the Standard Model of Cosmology
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Wished for Johns Hopkins Hat (Johns Hopkins Official Store)
Cotton twill hat features a full color embroidered Johns Hopkins lacrosse design showcasing our shielded blue jay. Unstructured low profile fit. Just the right wash; renowned perfect fit. Fabric strap closure with brass slide buckle. 100% cotton twill. Adjustable. Black. By Legacy.

I’d love to have a Johns Hopkins hat just like this with “Math” instead of “Lacrosse”. Surely the department has them made occasionally?

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