🎧 The Too-Good-To-Be-True Cancer Cure | On the Media | WNYC Studios

Listened to The Too-Good-To-Be-True Cancer Cure from On the Media | WNYC Studios

Despite steadily declining rates of cancer deaths over the past two decades, cancer remains responsible for 1 in every 6 deaths worldwide. It’s a scourge. So when, this week, an Israeli company called Accelerated Evolution Biotechnologies captured the news cycle with promises of a complete cure for cancer within the year, the story caught fire.

The company’s technology is called “MuTaTo” — that's multi-target toxin. And, to judge from the news media this week, it seems vetted, verified and veering us all toward a cancer-free future. Reports began in the Jerusalem Post, but quickly took off, making their way into various Murdoch-owned publications like FOX and the New York Post and landing in local news outlets around the country and the globe.

A couple days into the fanfare, the skeptics started coming out: for one thing, as oncologist David Gorski points out in his blog “Respectful Insolence,” the claims are based on experiments with mice: no human trials have yet started. For another, they haven’t been sufficiently peer reviewed. In fact, the company won’t share its research, claiming it can’t afford the expense. The too-good-to-be-true story appears to be just that, built on PR puffery. But who can resist a good cancer cure?

With Mutato in mind, for this week’s podcast extra, we revisit our Breaking News Consumer’s Handbook: Health News edition, with Gary Schwitzer, publisher & founder of HealthNewsReview.org.

This is a fantastic piece of reporting relating to improved journalism and media consumption with respect to the frequent health studies seen in the main stream media. For those interested, here’s a link to the original version from 2015.

🎧 The Daily: Trump Wanted to Scrap Obamacare. His Party Didn’t. | New York Times

Listened to The Daily: Trump Wanted to Scrap Obamacare. His Party Didn’t. from New York Times

The latest scuffle over health care shows a sea change in the Republican stance heading into the 2020 elections.

👓 The Death of an Adjunct | The Atlantic

Read The Death of an Adjunct (The Atlantic)
Thea Hunter was a promising, brilliant scholar. And then she got trapped in academia’s permanent underclass.

🎧 Economic Ripples: Hospital Closure Hurts A Town’s Ability To Attract Retirees | NPR

Listened to Economic Ripples: Hospital Closure Hurts A Town's Ability To Attract Retirees by Blake Farmer from NPR | Nashville Public Radio

When a rural community loses its hospital, health care becomes harder to come by in an instant. But a hospital closure also shocks a small town's economy. It shuts down one of its largest employers. It scares off heavy industry that needs an emergency room nearby. And in one Tennessee town, a lost hospital means lost hope of attracting more retirees.

Here’s a great example of why pure capitalist competition doesn’t work in areas like health care and education in large swathes of America. Small communities like this one often have only one option of a hospital to go to, and often they don’t even have that. And many health care issues don’t allow for direct competition and choice because they are emergent and one can only go to the closest provider with their fingers crossed.

👓 Zuckerberg San Francisco General’s aggressive tactics leave patients with big bills | Vox

Read A $20,243 bike crash: Zuckerberg hospital’s aggressive tactics leave patients with big bills by Sarah Kliff (Vox)
I spent a year writing about ER bills. Zuckerberg San Francisco General has the most surprising billing practices I’ve seen.

🎧 ‘The Daily’: A Conversation With a Freshman Democrat | New York Times

Listened to ‘The Daily’: A Conversation With a Freshman Democrat from New York Times

We spoke with Abigail Spanberger, a recently elected congresswoman from Virginia, about her first days in the Capitol and what it means to be a Democrat today.

Last week on “The Daily,” we looked at the campaign of a candidate who embodied the Democratic strategy for winning the House. This week, she arrived in Washington.

Abigail Spanberger a former C.I.A. officer, was elected as a Democrat in Virginia’s Seventh Congressional District. Listen to last week’s episode of “The Daily” about how the Democrats flipped the House, with a spotlight on Ms. Spanberger’s victory in a reliably conservative district.

The incoming group of House Democrats is the most diverse, most female freshman class in history. Members of the group also have major differences in ideology, which may present a challenge for Democratic leaders trying to unify their new House majority.

👓 How Japan’s prime minister plans to cope with daunting demography | The Economist

Read How Japan’s prime minister plans to cope with daunting demography (The Economist)
The reforms he has in mind are not bold enough

👓 Private IVF clinics urged to stop charging for expensive add-ons | Society | The Guardian

Read Private IVF clinics urged to stop charging for expensive add-ons by Matthew Weaver (the Guardian)
Fertility experts criticise use of optional extras that do not increase chance of pregnancy

📑 Anomie – Wikipedia | Annotations about economics

Annotated Anomie (Wikipedia)
Anomie (/ˈænəˌmi/) is a "condition in which society provides little moral guidance to individuals".[1] It is the breakdown of social bonds between an individual and the community, e.g., under unruly scenarios resulting in fragmentation of social identity and rejection of self-regulatory values.

I can’t help but see this definition and think it needs to be applied to economics immediately. In particular I can think of a few quick examples of economic anomie which are artificially covering up a free market and causing issues within individual communities.

College Textbooks

Here publishers are marketing to professors who assign particular textbooks and subverting students which are the actual market and consumers of those textbooks. This causes an inflated market and has allowed textbook prices to spiral out of control.

The American Health Care Market

In this example, the health care providers (doctors, hospitals, etc.) have been segmented away from their consumers (patients) by intermediary insurance companies which are driving the market to their own good rather than a free-er set of smaller (and importantly local) markets that would be composed of just the sellers and the buyers. As a result, the consumer of health care has no ability to put a particular price on what they’re receiving (and typically they rarely ever ask, even more so when they have insurance). This type of economic anomie is causing terrific havoc within the area.

(Aside: while the majority of health care markets is very small in size (by distance), I will submit that the advent of medical tourism does a bit to widen potential markets, but this segment of the market is tiny and very privileged in comparison.)

Others

In a non-economic setting it also seems to be highly applicable to social media silos like Facebook, Twitter, et al as they break social norms. I’ll have to circle back to write a longer essay about this with regard to the IndieWeb movement.

👓 Kushner-backed health care project gets ‘devastating’ review | Politico

Read Kushner-backed health care project gets ‘devastating’ review by Arthur Allen (POLITICO)
The Pentagon report could delay the VA’s plans to install the multibillion-dollar software project begun under Obama.

👓 How American women got stuck in the kitchen | The Economist

Read How American women got stuck in the kitchen (The Economist)
The IMF’s latest World Economic Outlook shows the cost of having no federal paid leave programme

You heard it, America is behind… and it doesn’t look like we’ll be catching up any time soon.

👓 A GoFundMe Campaign Is Not Health Insurance | The Nib

Read A GoFundMe Campaign Is Not Health Insurance (The Nib)
My friend died $50 short. It doesn’t have to be that way.

This is just a heartbreaking cartoon. I hope everyone will read it in full.

This is one of the most subtly poigniant panels:

“We eulogize [the fact that Americans help each other] in literature and art instead of political theory.”

🎧 It’s 2017. Why does medicine still run on fax machines? | Vox

Listened to It’s 2017. Why does medicine still run on fax machines? from Vox
How a plan to kill the fax machine with policy went awry.

This is a painfully sad and frustrating story. It also seems like something that business/capitalism isn’t going to solve on its own, but something which is crying out for an open spec to help things along. (And after that, if a business can come up with a better/faster solution, then more power to them.)

I can only think of the painful inefficiencies that are lurking in our healthcare system. And we wonder why things are so stupidly expensive?

This is a great example where applying César A. Hidalgo’s theory from Why Information Grows to decrease the friction for creating links can eliminate inefficiencies and create larger value. I still want to refine his statement into something simple and usable for both business and governmental use as well as to come up with some reasonably understandable math to provide a “proof” of the value.

👓 Republican Lawmakers Buy Health Insurance Stocks as Repeal Effort Moves Forward | The Intercept

Read Republican Lawmakers Buy Health Insurance Stocks as Repeal Effort Moves Forward by Lee Fang (The Intercept)
JUST AS THE HOUSE Republican bill to slash much of the Affordable Care Act moved forward, Rep. Mike Conaway, a Texas Republican and member of Speaker Paul Ryan’s leadership team, added a health insurance company to his portfolio.

Aren’t there ethics rules to cover nonsense like this?

👓 Three Strategies to Defend GOP Health Bill: Euphemisms, False Statements and Deleted Comments | Pro Publica

Read Three Strategies to Defend GOP Health Bill: Euphemisms, False Statements and Deleted Comments by Charles Ornstein (Pro Publica)
Since the passage of the American Health Care Act, Republican members of Congress have tried to swing public opinion to their side. ProPublica has been tracking what they’re saying.

We really do need more transparency in government. A bit of truth wouldn’t hurt either.

Continue reading “👓 Three Strategies to Defend GOP Health Bill: Euphemisms, False Statements and Deleted Comments | Pro Publica”