Reply to Why Trump? by George Lakoff

Replied to Why Trump? by George Lakoff (George Lakoff)
Donald Trump is winning Republican presidential primaries at such a great rate that he seems likely to become the next Republican presidential nominee and perhaps the next president. Democrats have little understanding of why he is winning — and winning handily, and even...
I appreciate the logic you’ve laid out on multiple levels here. I wish it were more widely viewed and shared. There’s an additional linguistic trick which Trump seems to take heavy advantage of as well: doublespeak. I’ve laid out some of the details here: http://boffosocko.com/2016/09/30/complexity-isnt-a-vice-10-word-answers-and-doubletalk-in-election-2016/ though I’ve got a slightly more nuanced approach now a year on and with additional data.

I enjoy your take on Direct vs. Systemic Causation which I bundle a bit more simply under the concept of “complexity”. The example I provide certainly fits well into your argument. It also seems to explain the political divide, which also follows the same party lines, in the ways the country views science in general, but the ideas of climate change and evolution specifically. While the evolution portion may be in direct conflict with the religious right, it doesn’t explain why so many don’t believe in the sciences generally or why they would be climate change deniers. Direct causation would seem to supersede the simple religion argument and explain the backlash against the sciences in general.

📖 Read pages 193-219 of Just My Type by Simon Garfield

📖 Read pages 193-219 of Just My Type: A Book about Fonts by Simon Garfield (Gotham Books, , ISBN: 978-1592406524)

Highlights, Quotes, & Marginalia

Not the least significant of their innovations was to produce a $ sign; previously, printers had used a long ‘S’.

Highlight (yellow) – 14. American Scottish > Page 197

in reference to Archibald Binny and James Ronaldson of Binny & Ronaldson
Added on Thursday, December 28, 2017 morning

Binny & Ronaldson’s best known font is Monticello, which they called Pica No. 1. This was a modern hybrid of Baskerville and Caslon.

Highlight (yellow) – 14. American Scottish > Page 197

Added on Thursday, December 28, 2017 morning

Many American book publishers, including Scribner and later Simon & Schuster, favoured what was known as Scotch Roman for their books,
a slightly more modern transitional face showing heavy influences of Bodoni and Didot.

Highlight (yellow) – 14. American Scottish > Page 197-198

Added on Thursday, December 28, 2017 morning

Franklin Gothic, a typeface named after Banjamin Franklin and first published in 1905. […] made by Morris Fuller Benton […] had its roots in the German Akzidenz Grotesk…

Highlight (yellow) – 14. American Scottish > Page 200

Added on Thursday, December 28, 2017 morning

(The German designer and head of Fontshop, Erik Spiekermann, co-wrote a book called Stop Stealing Sheep & Find Out How Type Works).

Highlight (green) – 14. American Scottish > Page 202

Added on Thursday, December 28, 2017 morning

But they [Obama campaign posters not set in Gotham] looked slightly wrong in Gill Sans and Lucinda, and they only fooled some of the people some of the time.

Highlight (yellow) – 15. Gotham is Go > Page 219

A solid reason not to be cheap on fonts or substitute well-known fonts for others. This chapter had some interesting branding thoughts on type for politics. The tangential reference here to Abraham Lincoln’s quote is well couched, but only vaguely funny.
Added on Thursday, December 28, 2017 morning

Guide to highlight colors

Yellow–general highlights and highlights which don’t fit under another category below
Orange–Vocabulary word; interesting and/or rare word
Green–Reference to read
Blue–Interesting Quote
Gray–Typography Problem
Red–Example to work through

👓 Everyone Should Have the Right To Bear Mathematical Arms | Slate | Edward Frenkel

Read Don’t Let Economists and Politicians Hack Your Math: Of course kids need to learn algebra by Edward Frenkel (Slate)

Imagine a world in which it is possible for an elite group of hackers to install a “backdoor” not on a personal computer but on the entire U.S. economy. Imagine that they can use it to cryptically raise taxes and slash social benefits at will. Such a scenario may sound far-fetched, but replace “backdoor” with the Consumer Price Index (CPI), and you get a pretty accurate picture of how this arcane economics statistic has been used.

Tax brackets, Social Security, Medicare, and various indexed payments, together affecting tens of millions of Americans, are pegged to the CPI as a measure of inflation. The fiscal cliff deal that the White House and Congress reached a month ago was almost derailed by a proposal to change the formula for the CPI, which Matthew Yglesias characterized as “a sneaky plan to cut Social Security and raise taxes by changing how inflation is calculated.” That plan was scrapped at the last minute. But what most people don’t realize is that something similar had already happened in the past. A new book, The Physics of Wall Streetby James Weatherall, tells that story: In 1996, five economists, known as the Boskin Commission, were tasked with saving the government $1 trillion. They observed that if the CPI were lowered by 1.1 percent, then a $1 trillion could indeed be saved over the coming decade. So what did they do? They proposed a way to alter the formula that would lower the CPI by exactly that amount!

🔖 NativeLand.ca

Bookmarked NativeLand.ca - Our home on native land (Native-land.ca)
Welcome to Native Land. This is a resource for North Americans (and others) to find out more about local indigenous territories and languages.
I ran across this over the Thanksgiving holiday. It would be cool to have more maps like this that spanned the globe as well as searchable by time span as well.

👓 Diplomats Sound the Alarm as They Are Pushed Out in Droves | New York Times

Read Diplomats Sound the Alarm as They Are Pushed Out in Droves by Gardiner Harris (New York Times)
A State Department exodus marks a new stage in the broken and increasingly contentious relationship between Rex W. Tillerson and much of his work force.

👓 October 2017: latest Stuff columns & my Twin Peaks experience | Richard MacManus

Read October 2017: latest Stuff columns & my Twin Peaks experience by Richard MacManus (Richard MacManus)
My weekly columns on Stuff, New Zealand's biggest news website, continue to generate interesting comments on the site and good feedback on social media. Last month we had a general election in New Zealand, so a couple of my columns focused on the tech policies of the major parties. Since the result of the election has yet to be finalised, it's unclear yet which direction the country will take with technology. In lieu of a reading recommendation this month, I want to discuss the extraordinary TV series that finished last month: Twin Peaks.
I suspect I’d be just as much an addict of Twin Peaks as Richard, but unfortunately I’ve been too busy recently to dip my to in. Fortunately he’s got a list of some interesting sounding resources when I go all-in.

📺 Linguist and Cognitive Scientist George Lakoff on Tavis Smiley (PBS)

Watched Linguist and Cognitive Scientist George Lakoff from PBS
The esteemed academic discusses Trump supporters who stay faithful to him even when he works against their material best interests and well-being.

Dr. Lakoff does a solid job of dissecting Trump’s communication style and providing some relatively solid advice to journalists and media outlets who aim to disrupt what Trump is attempting to accomplish. The discussion of morality and its role in our political system, albeit brief, was incredibly interesting.

In the last third of the interview, Lakoff provides an interesting reframing of much of the public/private case that Jacob Hacker and Paul Pierson make in their recent book American Amnesia.

Apparently there is another interview Smiley’s done with Dr. Lakoff. I can’t wait to watch it. I certainly would have appreciated an extended hour or two of their conversation.

I can see people like Jay Rosen and Keith Olbermann appreciating these interviews if they haven’t seen them.

This was so solid that I actually watched it a second time. It may also be time to dig into some of Lakoff’s other writings and research as well. Some of it I’ve read and seen before in general terms, but it’s probably worth delving into more directly.

👓 In tweet storm, Trump decries ‘illegal leaks’ and asserts ‘all agree’ he has complete power to pardon | Washington Post

Read In tweet storm, Trump decries ‘illegal leaks’ and asserts ‘all agree’ he has complete power to pardon (Washington Post)
The president said a Post report of Attorney General Jeff Sessions's discussions with the Russian ambassador was based on leaks that “must stop.”
I suspect there would be a revolution if Trump pulled out pardons for family or campaign aides much less himself.

👓 Sessions discussed Trump campaign-related matters with Russian ambassador, U.S. intelligence intercepts show | Washington Post

Read Sessions discussed Trump campaign-related matters with Russian ambassador, U.S. intelligence intercepts show (Washington Post)
The accounts from Sergey Kislyak to his superiors, intercepted by U.S. spy agencies, contradict public assertions by the attorney general.

📺 Global Political Expert and Author Dr. Brian Klaas on Tavis Smiley (PBS)

Watched Global Political Expert and Author Dr. Brian Klaas from PBS
The political expert and author discusses his latest book, The Despot’s Accomplice: How the West is Aiding & Abetting the Decline of Democracy. Dr. Brian Klaas is an expert on global democracy, democratic transitions, American politics, Western foreign policy, political violence, and elections -- and the security and economic risks of all these challenges. Klaas is the author of The Despot's Accomplice: How the West is Aiding & Abetting the Decline of Democracy. He is a Fellow in Global and Comparative Politics at the London School of Economics. Klaas has advised governments, US political campaigns, the European Union, multi-billion dollar investors, international NGOs, and international politicians.
It seems like every time I watch this show I need to buy another book. This time it’s The Despot’s Accomplice: How the West is Aiding & Abetting the Decline of Democracy.

📺 Journalist and Author Naomi Klein – Part 1 of 2 on Tavis Smiley (PBS)

Watched Journalist and Author Naomi Klein – Part 1 of 2 from PBS
The journalist and author discusses her latest book, No is Not Enough: Resisting Trump’s Shock Politics and Winning the World We Need. Part 1 of 2. Naomi Klein is an award-winning journalist, syndicated columnist and author of the international bestsellers, This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs The Climate (2014), The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism (2007) and No Logo (2000). In 2017, Klein became Senior Correspondent for The Intercept. She is also a Puffin Foundation Writing Fellow at The Nation Institute and contributor to the Nation Magazine. Recent articles have also appeared in The New York Times, The New Yorker, The Boston Globe, The Guardian, the London Review of Books and Le Monde. Her latest book is called No is Not Enough: Resisting Trump's Shock Politics and Winning the World We Need.
An interesting little episode. I’m glad there are two parts, but I already find myself wishing there were three.

👓 I Found HanAssholeSolo’s anti-Semitic Posts. Then, the Death Threats Started. | Politico

Read I Found HanAssholeSolo’s anti-Semitic Posts. Then, the Death Threats Started. (Politico Magazine)
This is what it’s like to report on extremism in the Trump era.

📺 Gerrymandering: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO) | YouTube

Watched Gerrymandering: Last Week Tonight from HBO
Lawmakers often reshape voting districts to shift the balance of political power. That's unfair to voters, even those of us with questionable judgment.

Gerrymandering has become a very precise science, and interestingly it’s one of the few remaining types of science in which the republican party currently believes.

–John Oliver

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A-4dIImaodQ

👓 We tracked the Trump scandals on right-wing news sites. Here’s how they covered it. | Vox

Read We tracked the Trump scandals on right-wing news sites. Here’s how they covered it. by Alvin Chang (Vox)
We’re experiencing these historical events very differently.