🎧 Misery in the Name of Liberty | On the Media | WNYC Studios

Listened to Misery in the Name of Liberty from On the Media | WNYC Studios

The Venezuelan press has been facing repression for years. This week, On the Media explores how journalists in the country are struggling to cover the standoff between two men who claim to be president. Also, how both the history of American interventionism and the legacy of Simón Bolívar color coverage of Venezuela. Plus, a critical look at the images coming out of Chinese internment camps.

1. Mariana Zuñiga [@marazuniga], freelance reporter based in Caracas, on her experience covering Venezuela's presidential standoff. Listen

2. Miguel Tinker Salas [@mtinkersalas], professor of history at Pomona College, on the legacy of Simón Bolívar. Listen.

3. Stephen Kinzer [@stephenkinzer], professor of international relations at Brown University, on the history of American intervention in Latin America. Listen

4. Rian Thum [@RianThum], senior research fellow at the University of Nottingham, on the internment of Uighurs by the Chinese government. Listen

I particularly liked the segment on the journalistic issue of photos seen in outlets which are supplied by the Chinese government and what they tell or don’t about the state of the journalism related to the Uighurs.

🎧 Empire State of Mind | On the Media | WNYC Studios

Listened to Empire State of Mind by Brooke GladstoneBrooke Gladstone from On the Media | WNYC Studios

Recently, a member of the Trump administration called Puerto Rico “that country,” obscuring once more the relationship between the island colony and the American mainland. In a special hour this week, On the Media examines the history of US imperialism — and why the familiar US map hides the true story of our country. Brooke spends the hour with Northwestern University historian Daniel Immerwahr, author of How to Hide an Empire: A History of the Greater United States.

A stunning 50 minutes of American History here! Folks who enjoyed John Biewen and Scene on Radio’s Seeing White series are sure to love some additional layers and texture that this view on our history brings.

I’d read it in my youth and knew of it more generally, but I didn’t know that Rudyard Kipling’s “White Man’s Burden” was written as advice to the United States about what to do in the Philippines where there was a long and bloody US war. Then the episode has a gut-punch of a quote I’d never heard from Mark Twain, who was friends with Kipling:

‘there must be two Americas. One that sets the captive free and one that takes a once captive’s new freedom away from him, picks a quarrel with him with nothing founded on and then kills him to get his land. For that second America,’ he proposed adding a few words to the Declaration of Independence, ‘governments derive their just powers from the consent of the governed White men.’

If asked before today what the bloodiest war fought on US soil was, I’d have said “The Civil War” as I suspect that most would. Interestingly it turns out that it was the Japanese conquest of the Philippines during World War II that claimed 1.5 million people–or the equivalent of two civil wars. Why don’t most students know this fact? Likely because 1 million of that number were not white. They were Filipinos who were also considered U.S. nationals at the time.

Another surprising thing I hadn’t considered before, and mentioned here, is that a large portion of the “British Invasion” of music in the 1960’s–including that of The Beatles–can be likely be put down to the fact that there’s a major U.S. military base put into Liverpool just after World War II. The increased trade and exposure of local youth to American rock-and-roll music as well as instruments sourced from the base had a tremendous influence on the city and the music that would result.

These are just of a few of my favorite portions of this incredible show.

This episode is Part 2 of their series, “On American Expansion.” I can’t wait to hear the rest.

🔖 How to Hide an Empire: A History of the Greater United States by Daniel Immerwahr

Bookmarked How to Hide an Empire: A History of the Greater United States by Daniel ImmerwahrDaniel Immerwahr (Farrar, Straus and Giroux)

A pathbreaking history of the United States’ overseas possessions and the true meaning of its empire

We are familiar with maps that outline all fifty states. And we are also familiar with the idea that the United States is an “empire,” exercising power around the world. But what about the actual territories―the islands, atolls, and archipelagos―this country has governed and inhabited?

In How to Hide an Empire, Daniel Immerwahr tells the fascinating story of the United States outside the United States. In crackling, fast-paced prose, he reveals forgotten episodes that cast American history in a new light. We travel to the Guano Islands, where prospectors collected one of the nineteenth century’s most valuable commodities, and the Philippines, site of the most destructive event on U.S. soil. In Puerto Rico, Immerwahr shows how U.S. doctors conducted grisly experiments they would never have conducted on the mainland and charts the emergence of independence fighters who would shoot up the U.S. Congress.

In the years after World War II, Immerwahr notes, the United States moved away from colonialism. Instead, it put innovations in electronics, transportation, and culture to use, devising a new sort of influence that did not require the control of colonies. Rich with absorbing vignettes, full of surprises, and driven by an original conception of what empire and globalization mean today, How to Hide an Empire is a major and compulsively readable work of history.

hat tip: On the Media: Empire State of Mind

🎧 Policing the Police | On the Media | WNYC Studios

Listened to Policing the Police from On the Media | WNYC Studios

California recently passed a law that eliminates some of the barriers to accessing records on egregious police misconduct and deadly use of force. With the floodgates open, journalists, like KPCC investigative reporter Annie Gilbertson, are elated and terrified. Just one police violation can come with hundreds of associated documents for journalists to comb through. 

So, instead of fighting tooth and nail for the scoop, over 30 media organizations across the state are teaming up to share resources, bodies and insight as they begin the arduous task of combing through the newly-available records. The coalition is called the California Reporting Project. Bob Garfield talked with Gilbertson about what the project is uncovering.

🎧 The Daily: The Brief, Controversial Tenure of Kirstjen Nielsen | New York Times

Listened to The Daily: The Brief, Controversial Tenure of Kirstjen Nielsen from New York Times

As homeland security secretary, she enacted and publicly defended the family separation policy. In President Trump’s eyes, she didn’t go far enough.

🎧 The Daily: Why Did New York’s Most Selective Public High School Admit Only 7 Black Students? | New York Times

Listened to The Daily: Why Did New York’s Most Selective Public High School Admit Only 7 Black Students? from New York Times

The latest admissions numbers at Stuyvesant High School offer a stark picture of the persistent racial divide in America’s largest school system.

Perhaps the problem is more systemic than the small band-aid they’re offering as a means of fixing it?

🎧 The Daily: One Family’s Story of Survival and Loss in New Zealand | New York Times

Listened to The Daily: One Family’s Story of Survival and Loss in New Zealand from New York Times

The loved ones of a man killed in the Christchurch mosque attacks say goodbye to a son, father, husband and brother.

🎧 Chef’s Memoir Tackles What It’s Like To Be Young, Gifted And Black In Fine Dining | NPR

Listened to Chef's Memoir Tackles What It's Like To Be Young, Gifted And Black In Fine Dining by Lulu Garcia-Navarro and Maria Godoy from NPR

It was the morning after the election of America's first black president, and Kwame Onwuachi was hungover. He'd been partying all night. He was dealing drugs to survive after he dropped out of college. He was, he says, lost.

But when he saw President Obama, something clicked. "I thought, I can do anything. And I immediately flushed everything that I had down the toilet and was like, I need to find myself," Onwuachi recalls.

He went to the grocery store and bought ingredients to cook a chicken curry. "I didn't know that I wanted to cook, but it was like, here's something that I'm familiar with," he says. "Here's something that brings back these fond memories. And here's something that grounds me. And I want to explore this a little bit more."

We do need more variety in our general cuisines and even in our fine dining cuisine.

I’ve even noticed that Christopher Kimball is doing a lot more international and less-focused on food in his Milk Street television show. Sadly it only seems to be filling a massive hole left by Anthony Bourdain’s coverage. I’ve noticed that Martha Stewart has a show with some international cuisine like this, but it seems to be heavily influenced by a massive funder for PR purposes and she’s often watering down the authenticity of the dishes a bit excessively.

🔖 Identifying White Mediocrity and Know-Your-Place Aggression: A Form of Self-Care | African American Review | Project MUSE

Bookmarked Identifying White Mediocrity and Know-Your-Place Aggression: A Form of Self-Care by Koritha Mitchell (African American Review | Project MUSE, Volume 51, Number 4, Winter 2018, pp. 253-262)

This article offers a primer on identifying what the author calls “know-your-place aggression” as well as the violence of white mediocrity being treated as merit. The author argues that gaining clarity about these hostile tendencies is a form of self-care. Examples include experiences with racism, (hetero)sexism, trans antagonism, ableism, and Islamophobia. Understanding know-your-place aggression and white mediocrity can prevent marginalized communities from wasting energy by worrying about the opinions of people who use objective standards to judge everyone but themselves. The author encourages this form of self-care because she believes it can empower members of marginalized groups to save their energy for what matters most, the quality of their lives and their contributions to research.

10.1353/afa.2018.0045

👓 A Room of One’s Own White Colleagues | Diverse Education

Read A Room of One’s Own White Colleagues by (Diverse)
Every spring, I dread putting together my annual review materials. In March, a predominantly White room full of senior colleagues will discuss whether I meet th

He doesn’t even mention all the additional heavy mentoring work that he likely does for other minorities, POC, etc. which go above and beyond what his white colleagues are doing.

A Room of One’s Own White Colleagues  

Subtle hat tip to Virginia Woolf.

March 19, 2019 at 03:02PM

🎧 The Daily: What Hollywood Keeps Getting Wrong About Race | New York Times

Listened to The Daily: What Hollywood Keeps Getting Wrong About Race from New York Times

Wesley Morris joins us to talk about “Green Book,” the latest Oscar winner to focus on a white character’s moral journey in an interracial friendship.

I love Wesley Morris’s analysis here. Racial reconciliation fantasy is a great name for a rampant problem we’ve got in America. While it’s nice to try to sweep the problem under the rug, we really need to bring it out front and center and have a more honest discussion about it.

This may be one of the best podcast episodes I’ve heard in two months. I highly recommend it.

👓 Matt Kuchar stiffing his caddie was horrible. His response to the backlash is worse. | SBNation.com

Read Matt Kuchar stiffing his caddie was horrible. His response to the backlash is worse. (SBNation.com)
Kuchar doesn’t understand why everyone is so mad about a Tour pro with almost $50 million in earnings giving his caddie in Mexico an obscenely low percentage of a winner’s check.

👓 A Reading List for Ralph Northam | The Atlantic

Read A Reading List for Ralph Northam by Ibram X. KendiIbram X. Kendi (The Atlantic)
If he won’t step down, the governor will need this anti-racist syllabus.

The sad part is that there needs to be a Ralph Northam story for people to potentially be interested in reading an article like this much less consume some of the reading list he kindly provides. I’ve started Kendi’s book myself and have to say it’s quite enlightening with lots of history that’s not commonly taught in most high school or college curricula.

For those without as much reading time there’s also the excellent Seeing White podcast that folks might appreciate.

📑 Read Write Respond #037 | Read Write Collect | Aaron Davis

Annotated Read Write Respond #037 by Aaron DavisAaron Davis (Read Write Collect)
This a harrowing story made even sadder by the grim reality of the statistics.  

I’m almost losing count of how many racial health disparity stories I’ve been seeing lately. It’s so common I’ve got tags for it on my site now.

👓 I Was Pregnant and in Crisis. All the Doctors and Nurses Saw Was an Incompetent Black Woman | Time

👓 Stress From Racism May Be Causing African-American Babies To Die More Often | NPR

Read How Racism May Cause Black Mothers To Suffer The Death Of Their Infants (NPR.org)
African-American women are more likely to lose a baby in the first year of life than women of any other race. Scientists think that stress from racism makes their bodies and babies more vulnerable.