🎧 Long live the Carolina African Runner | Eat This Podcast

Long live the Carolina African Runner Who cares whether it really is the "ur-peanut" of the American South by Jeremy Cherfas from Eat This Podcast
Maybe you’ve seen the stories about a peanut, prosaically named Carolina Runner No. 4? In 2017 it will be ready to be grown in commercial quantities, having faded gently away from being the primary peanut before the 1840s to a reasonable contender into the 1910s to presumed extinct by the 1950s. Professor David Shields, an historian at the University of South Carolina, found it in a genebank as part of a project by the Carolina Gold Rice Foundation, which he chairs, to restore the crucial varieties of the American South. It’s a fine story, but a couple of things bothered me. One, how do they know it is “the first peanut cultivated in North America” or “the South’s original peanut” as all the articles claim. Two, although everyone acknowledges that the peanut came to the USA not from South America, it’s ancestral home, but from West Africa with enslaved people, nobody seems to be much interested in what on earth it was doing in West Africa, or the consequences of its introduction there by the Portuguese. The podcast looks a bit at the question of whether Carolina Runner No. 4 – henceforth Carolina African Runner – is indeed the “ur-peanut”; I conclude that it doesn’t really matter. My article sketching the peanut’s influence in West Africa is here. http://media.blubrry.com/eatthispodcast/p/mange-tout.s3.amazonaws.com/2017/peanut.mp3 Podcast: Play in new window | Download (Duration: 7:10 — 6.1MB) Subscribe: Android | RSS | More peanut Maybe you’ve seen the stories about a peanut, prosaically named Carolina Runner No. 4? In ...

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🎧 India’s bread landscape and my plans here | Eat This Podcast

India’s bread landscape and my plans here A podcast about this podcast and another podcast by Jeremy Cherfas from Eat This Podcast
This is the last of the short episodes of the holiday season. It is also something of a meta-episode because it is mostly about this podcast and another podcast. I’ve hinted before that I’d like to do more constructed shows here, where I speak to a few different people about a topic to try and get a broader sense of the subject. They’re harder to do, but more rewarding, and they consistently get more listeners. The problem is that as a one-man band, I don’t have the time I need to do that kind of show very often. As an experiment, I’m going to try chunking episodes into seasons, with a break between seasons when I’ll be working on those more complex shows. I’m not sure yet how long either the seasons or the breaks will be.

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This Week in Google 386: You Got Something Jammed in There Good

This Week in Google 386 You Got Something Jammed in There Good by Leo Laporte, Jeff Jarvis, and Mathew Ingram from TWiT.tv
How targeted ads on Google and Facebook are affecting politics and destroying mass media. CES 2017: Alexa everywhere, Samsung's Chromebook Pro, Asus ZenFones, and Qualcomm's Snapdragon 835. Google Home's New Year Resolutions. Jeff's Number: Celebrity Telethon on Facebook Live vs. Trump inauguration Mathew's Stuff: From Tape Drives to Memory Orbs, the Data Formats of Star Wars Suck (Spoilers) Leo's Tool: Pre-register Super Mario Run for Android

This Week in Google 384: Schmoopie

This Week in Google 384 Schmoopie by Leo Laporte, Jeff Jarvis, Stacey Higginbotham from TWiT.tv
What the world searched for in 2016, Mark Zuckerberg's AI home assistant sounds like Morgan Freeman, fake news, Uber loses $3 billion, Tom Wheeler quits the FCC, Waymo minivans. Stacey's Thing: Canary Flex Jeff's Number: $250 million home for tech in NYC Leo's Tool: Netgear Orbi

This Week in Google 383: The Spectacles Spectacular

This Week in Google 383 The Spectacles Spectacular by Leo Laporte, Jeff Jarvis, Stacey Higginbotham from TWiT.tv
Trump meets with tech leaders. Yahoo reveals a new hack of 1 billion accounts. Google's self-driving division is now a new Alphabet company called Waymo. Google Assistant will add Actions on Google. Android Things, Google's IoT platform, gets a developer preview. Is Magic Leap a hoax?

🎧 Gillmor Gang: Unborn Child

Gillmor Gang: Unborn Child by Robert Scoble, Keith Teare, Frank Radice, Kevin Marks, and Steve Gillmor from TechCrunch
Oh no, Volumetrics meets the Beatles in a trip forward down memory lane. Eventually we even discover the chewy center. Plus the latest G3 (below) with Mary Hodder, Elisa Camahort Page, Francine Hardaway, and Tina Chase Gillmor.

Note from 12/20/16: Like others commented on the show, the concept of the Unborn Child and the Living Dead in analogizing new technologies (at least from the perspective of venture capital) is a very interesting and useful one.

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🎧 Gillmor Gang: Monetize This

Gillmor Gang: Monetize This by John Taschek, Keith Teare, Frank Radice, Kevin Marks, and Steve Gillmor from TechCrunch
Waiting for latency can be a lonely thing, but the media march toward live streaming reaches new urgency.

🎧 This Week in Google 382: Last Media

This Week in Google 382 Last Media by Leo Laporte, Jeff Jarvis, Stacey Higginbotham, and Mathew Ingram from TWiT.tv
Google goes 100% renewable in 2017. Google and Minecraft's Hour of Code plans. Amazon Go is a vision for the automated grocery store. New Qualcomm 10nm server chips. YouTube Rewind 2016. Pardon Edward Snowden! Mathew Ingram's pick: Design Solutions for Fake News Google Doc is a collaborative effort to combat fake news. Stacey's things: GE Z-Wave Wireless Lighting Control and iDevices Outdoor Switch - control your holiday lights from your phone! Leo's Picks: Dark Patterns catalogs user interfaces designed to trick people, and QEMU Advent Calendar 2016 is the geekiest advent calendar ever.

Mention of Dark Patterns which sounds like an interesting UX/UI resource for “fighting user deception worldwide.”

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🎧 Episode 29: Dot blog | Timetable

Episode 29: Dot blog by Manton Reece from timetable.manton.org
I got a new domain! I talk about the .blog registration process and my evolving plans. http://timetable.manton.org/podcast-player/94/episode-29-dot-blog.mp3 Download file | Play in new window | Duration: 4:26

From a big proponent of microblogging, this seems suspiciously like a micropodcast.

I’m surprised more people aren’t doing something like this. I’m considering doing something similar myself now.

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🎧 This Week in Google 381: Bikinis in the Man Cave

This Week in Google 381 Bikinis in the Man Cave by Leo Laporte, Jeff Jarvis, and Kevin Marks from TWiT.tv
Google will make $4 billion in sales from the Pixel and Pixel XL. Gooligan hack puts malware on 1 million Android phones. The petition to repeal the Snoopers' Charter has gotten over 100,000 signatures. The Internet Archive is moving to Canada. San Francisco transit hit by ransomware attack. How to start an infinite loop with Amazon Echo and Google Home.

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🎧 This Week in Google 380: Cauliflower Sex Tape

This Week in Google 380 Cauliflower Sex Tape by Leo Laporte, Jeff Jarvis, Stacey Higginbotham from TWiT.tv
How micro-targeted ads on Facebook helped get Donald Trump elected. Intel's place in a world of single-purpose devices. Google's lip reading Deep Mind. Pixel phone re-sellers unbanned from Google. Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade in VR on YouTube.

🎧 This Week in Google 379: Ixnay on the Eet-tway

This Week in Google 379 Ixnay on the Eet-tway by Leo Laporte, Jeff Jarvis, Stacey Higginbotham from TWiT.tv
Does Facebook have a responsibility to weed out fake news stories? Google releases PhotoScan to digitize your old pictures. Google Translate gets some machine learning improvements. Twitter kicks out alt-right users. BLU phones sending user info to China. Snapchat Spectacles will be available in Tulsa next - and Snapchat files a secret IPO. Stacey's Thing: June oven Jeff's Number: Facebook's new measurement strategies Leo's Thing: 2016 MacBook Pro

A great episode as usual. The discussion at the beginning on the fake news issue in the media recently was particularly good.

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Leonard Cohen Hallelujah Covers | Spotify Playlist

Almost five hours of cover versions of one of Leonard Cohen's most famous songs

I hadn’t noticed until now because of a head cold that’s taken me out of commission this weekend, but because of the passing of Leonard Cohen at the end of last week and possibly the cold open of Saturday Night Live, a growing number of people are following/using a Spotify Playlist I had made earlier this year in January.

If you need almost five hours of all the extant Hallelujah covers on Spotify to soothe your soul (for any reason), please feel free to save yourself the time of building it and enjoy my playlist. If you’re aware of any missing covers (that exist on Spotify), please let me know and I’m happy to add them to the collection.

Keep your chin up!

Leonard Cohen (), a Canadian singer, songwriter, poet and novelist
in Various Positions (Recorded June 1984; released December 1984) for Columbia Records, produced by John Lissauer

 

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Dave Brubeck – Time Series

Time Series by Dave Brubeck

Including Time Out, Time Further Out, Time Changes, Countdown: Time in Outer Space, and Time In, this series of albums commonly known as the Time Series from Dave Brubeck and the Dave Brubeck Quartet is a masterclass in how important time is in music as well as how it can evolve.

Here you’ll find Brubeck experimenting with time signatures including recordings of “Take Five” in 5/4 time, “Pick Up Sticks” in 6/4, “Unsquare Dance” in 7/4, “World’s Fair” in 13/4, and “Blue Rondo à la Turk” in 9/8.

This is a great way to spend the day/night when you have some active listening time.

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