👓 IndieBookClub | Manton Reece

Read IndieBookClub by Manton Reece (manton.org)
As I mentioned in my IndieWeb Summit wrap-up, I added support for IndieBookClub while in Portland. IndieBookClub is a little like Goodreads, but built on standards like Microformats and Micropub so that you can post what you’re reading to your own blog. Now that I’m back in Austin, I’ve tweake...
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👓 Sending your First Webmention from Scratch | Aaron Parecki

Read Sending your First Webmention from Scratch by Aaron PareckiAaron Parecki (Aaron Parecki)
Webmention is one of the fundamental indieweb building blocks. It enables rich interactions between websites, like posting a comment or favorite on one site from another site. This post will walk you through the simplest way to get started sending webmentions to other sites so that you can use your ...

A stupendous article, I just wish I’d had it all those many years ago. Thanks Aaron!

One useful thing for beginners that I don’t think got mentioned (pun intended!) in the article is that for receiving websites which don’t have a built in webmention form you can use a service like http://mention-tech.appspot.com/ which will allow you to manually put in the sending site and the receiving site and it will act as a bridge to send the webmention for you.

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Dinner on the lawn followed by Muse/ique summer concert

Dinner on the lawn followed by Muse/ique summer concert

Dinner on the lawn followed by Muse/ique summer concert

Instagram filter used: Clarendon

Photo taken at: The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens

 

Limitless/Lenny

Mingling and dining 6pm | Performance 8pm
Superhero of the American arts Leonard Bernstein gets a 100th birthday bash filled with limitless imagination! Bernstein expanded the dimensions of classical music and defied all categories and stereotypes during his legendary career. In the process, he completely redefined the American sound, collaborating with people like Paul Simon and Frank Sinatra and counting the Beatles and Motown among his influences—even as he introduced new audiences to classical music through the New York Philharmonic’s Young People’s Concerts from 1958-1972: the first such project to be aired on broadcast television. The only way to celebrate this kind of legacy is an event featuring groundbreaking artists and innovative performances:

  • Classical crossover violinist Charles Yang lends his “guerrilla-style” flair to a suite of songs from West Side Story, plus a few surprises.
  • and the LA Choral Lab stirs the soul and shows us the promise of tomorrow with selections including “Make our Garden Grow” from Candide.
  • Kitty McNamee’s dancers and DJ E.Z. Mike take us on an electrifying journey of what Bernstein’s score for On the Waterfront can mean for us today, with projected visuals by artists from JPL.

Featuring:

  • The Muse/ique Orchestra
  • Charles Yang – Violin – Recipient of the 2018 Leonard Bernstein Award | Lincoln Center’s Metropolitan Opera House | Carnegie Hall
  • LA Choral Lab – Vocals – Colburn School | First Congregational Church of Los Angeles | First United Methodist Church
  • Kitty McNamee Dancers – Dance – LA Philharmonic | LA Opera | Secret Cinema
  • Dan Goods and David Delgado – Visual Strategists – The Studio at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory | Museum of Awe
  • EZ Mike – DJ – Santana’s Grammy Award-winning Album Supernatural | Zoolander Original Motion Picture Soundtrack | Fight Club Original Motion Picture Soundtrack
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    Reply to I attended IndieWeb Summit 2018 | Fogknife

    Replied to I attended IndieWeb Summit 2018 by Jason McIntosh (Fogknife)
    Notes and thoughts from the eighth annual IndieWeb conference, held in Portland, Oregon.

    My heart forever broken by social-media silos, I’m not really interested in using Micro.blog as yet another “Okay, I’m over here now” social network. I get the impression that it has potential for much deeper use than that, if I can only get my head around it.

    Micro.blog can be many things to many people which can be confusing, particularly when you’re a very tech savvy person and can see all the options at once. I’d recommend looking at it like a custom feed reader for a community of people you’d like to follow and interact with. Spend some time in the reader and just interact with those you’re following and they’ll do likewise in return.

    It’s purposely missing some of the dopamine triggers other social silos have, so you may need to retrain your brain to use it appropriately, but I think it’s worthwhile if you do.


    I really need to hash out my domain situation! IndieWeb encourages its memership to claim a single domain and use it as their personal stamp for everything they do on the internet. I, though, have two domains: my long-held personal catch-all domain of jmac.org, and fogknife.com, which I use exclusively for blogging. My use of both predates my involvement with IndieWeb.

    Don’t fret too much over having multiple websites. As you continue on the answer to what you want to do with them will eventually emerge more organically than if you force it to. For some thoughts and inspiration, check out https://indieweb.org/multi-site_indieweb.

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    👓 IndieWeb Summit 2018 wrap-up | Manton Reece

    Read IndieWeb Summit 2018 wrap-up by Manton Reece (manton.org)
    Last week I was in Portland for IndieWeb Summit. This was only my second IndieWeb conference (the first was IndieWebCamp in Austin). I had a great time in Portland and got even more than I expected out of IndieWeb Summit. The first day was short keynotes and sessions led by attendees on a range of t...
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    👓 Why 2016 Was the Year of the Algorithmic Timeline | Motherboard

    Read Why 2016 Was the Year of the Algorithmic Timeline (Motherboard)
    2016 was the year that the likes of Instagram and Twitter decided they knew better than you what content you wanted to see in your feeds.

    use algorithms to decide on what individual users most wanted to see. Depending on our friendships and actions, the system might deliver old news, biased news, or news which had already been disproven.


    2016 was the year of politicians telling us what we should believe, but it was also the year of machines telling us what we should want.


    The only way to insure your posts gain notice is to bombard the feed and hope that some stick, which risks comprising on quality and annoying people.


    Sreekumar added: “Interestingly enough, the change was made after Instagram opened the doors to brands to run ads.” But even once they pay for visibility, a brand under pressure to remain engaging: “Playing devil’s advocate for a second here: All the money in the world cannot transform shitty content into good content.”

    Artificially limiting reach of large accounts to then turn around and demand extortion money? It’s the social media mafia!


    It disorients the reader, and distracts them with endless, timeless content.

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    👓 A Close Look at How Facebook’s Retreat From the News Has Hurt One Particular Website—Ours | Slate

    Read A Close Look at How Facebook’s Retreat From the News Has Hurt One Particular Website—Ours by Will Oremus (Slate Magazine)
    New data shows the impact of Facebook’s pullback from an industry it had dominated (and distorted).

    (Roose, who has since deleted his tweet as part of a routine purge of tweets older than 30 days, told me it was intended simply as an observation, not a full analysis of the trends.)

    Another example of someone regularly deleting their tweets at regular intervals. I’ve seem a few examples of this in academia.


    It’s worth noting that there’s a difference between NewsWhip’s engagement stats, which are public, and referrals—that is, people actually clicking on stories and visiting publishers’ sites. The two have generally correlated, historically, and Facebook told me that its own data suggests that continues to be the case. But two social media professionals interviewed for this story, including one who consults for a number of different publications, told me that the engagement on Facebook posts has led to less relative traffic. This means publications could theoretically be seeing less ad revenue from Facebook even if their public engagement stats are holding steady.


    From Slate’s perspective, a comment on a Slate story you see on Facebook is great, but it does nothing for the site’s bottom line.


    (Remember when every news site published the piece, “What Time Is the Super Bowl?”)

    This is a great instance for Google’s box that simply provides the factual answer instead of requiring a click through.


    fickle audiences available on social platforms.

    Here’s where feed readers without algorithms could provide more stability for news.

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    👓 How Facebook Punked and then Gut Punched the News Biz | TPM

    Read How Facebook Punked and then Gut Punched the News Biz by Josh Marshall (Talking Points Memo)
    In the digital publishing world, there’s been a buzz about this article in Slate in which slate staffer Will Oremus detailed the impact on the publication of Facebook’s dramatic retreat from the news business. The numbers are stark but not surprising for people in the industry. Indeed, Oremus makes the point that most news organizations are not willing to release these numbers. (We’ll come back to that point in a moment.) In January 2017 Slate had 28.33 million referrals from Facebook to Slate. By last month that number had dropped to 3.63 million. In other words, a near total collapse.
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    📺 Scalar 2.0 — Trailer | YouTube

    Watched Scalar 2.0 — Trailer from YouTube

    Learn about the features of Scalar, refreshed with the Scalar 2.0 interface.

    This is an intriguing looking tool for potential academic use. I’ll have to find some time to download it and play around.

    📺 IndieWeb Summit 2018 Green Room #nonprofit | YouTube

    Watched IndieWeb Summit 2018 Green Room #nonprofit from YouTube

    Discussing a non-profit org to benefit IndieWeb and the indie web

    Playing catch up on some of the sessions I wish I’d had time to be at in person.

    There are several ways of doing the non-profit thing in this venue. Many of them don’t bring a lot of additional benefit however. One could set up a side foundation to help on the fundraising and spending side, but as a group, I suspect we’re more than fine for right now.

    👓 ‘I snookered them’: Illinois Nazi candidate creates GOP dumpster fire | POLITICO

    Read ‘I snookered them’: Illinois Nazi candidate creates GOP dumpster fire (POLITICO)
    Republicans fear blowback from a Holocaust denier’s run for Congress.

    How has the state party just sat by and ignored this altogether? Deplorable…

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    👓 Spending a Morning on the Indie Web | Interdependent Thoughts

    Read Spending a Morning on the Indie Web by Ton Zijlstra (Interdependent Thoughts)
    When Hossein Derakshan came back on-line after a 6 year absence in 2015, he was shocked to find how the once free flowing web ended up in walled gardens and silo’s. Musing about what he presented at State of the Net earlier this month, I came across Frank Meeuwsen’s postingabout the IndieWeb Summit starting today in Portland (livestream on YT). That send me off on a short trip around the IndieWeb and related topics.

    Looks like you’ve also managed to add webmentions and a few other goodies too! Your theme also reminds me that I want to finish up on my microformats v2 fork of the Twenty Twelve theme.

    The other two are where the open web is severely lacking: The seamless integration into one user interface of both reading and writing, making it very easy to respond to others that way, or add to the river of content.

    As I read this I can’t help thinking about my friend Aaron Davis (h) a member of the IndieWeb, whose domain name is appropriately https://readwriterespond.com/.

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    Replied to Sharing brief @IndieWebSummit notes as they come to mind. by Tantek ÇelikTantek Çelik (tantek.com)
    Sharing brief @IndieWebSummit notes as they come to mind.

    This was the first year people pre-wrote proposals before the #BarCamp organizing session. As facilitator I decided to have people who never proposed before go first.
     
    Coincidentally, @Christi3k just announced the same thing @OSBridge unconference organizing session.

    This may be worth codifing as a normal practice. Let first-timers propose sessions first before anyone who has done this before, especially at an @IndieWebCamp before.

    The other thing I did was, after the the first-timers finished explaining and scheduling their BarCamp session proposals, I had people *other than* the remaining session proposers choose from the remaining session proposals posted on the side of the grid, and advocate for them. I think that worked quite well for selecting for the sessions that were more compelling for more people.

    I was just thinking about how this might be codified a bit better as well, particularly for folks who are attending their first BarCamp-style event.

    While there is some implication in the event pages, I don’t know if some people were expecting the sessions and planning to play out the way they did (or if they knew what to expect on that front at all, particularly in chatting with people in the early morning registration/breakfast part of the day).

    It was certainly more productive for me to think about and post some of the things I wanted to accomplish pre-camp. (It also helped to have your reminder a month or more ago about what I might build before even going to the summit.)

    Having additional time to know what the scheduling process looks like, if nothing else, gives people a bit more time to think about what they want to get out of the conference and propose some additional ideas without being under the short time crunch. This is particularly apropos when the morning presentations may have run long and the conference is already a few minutes off track and we’re eating into valuable session time otherwise. I would suspect that helping to get the session ideas flowing sooner than later may also help the idea and creative processes, and even more so for participants who may need a bit more time to organize their thoughts and communicate them as they’d like.

    I definitely liked the process of having beginners go first and then letting people advocate for particular ideas thereafter. This worked particularly well for an established event and one with so many people. It might be helpful to pre-select one potentially popular proposal from an older hand to go first though, to provide an example of the process for those who are new to it, and in particular those who might be quiet, shy, or not be the type to raise their hands and advocate in front of such a large group. In fact, given this, another option is to allow people to propose sessions and then allow advocation across the board, but for beginners first followed by everyone thereafter. This may also encourage better thought out initial proposals as well.

    Thanks again for all your hard work and preparation Tantek!

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