Replied to Micropub Tweetstorm Builder by Boris Boris (Fission Talk)

Description

People write tweetstorms because they’re “easier” than whatever their blog setup is. And the constraints of 280 characters at a time makes for both careful sentence construction and flow.

But - then you’ve got this lovely writing that is trapped on Twitter. At best, you come back and copy / paste the tweets back into a blog post.

The idea is a Micropub enabled tweetstorm builder. You log into it with your Twitter account and with Indieauth so that posts end up as one big blog post on your own site, but are sent to Twitter as a tweetstorm / collection.

User Impact

Who would want to use this and why?

Anyone that wants to compose tweetstorms in a richer environment while also having it post to their own site.

Features

PWA

Twitter login

Create a Twitter collection — I actually don’t know what all the features of collections are. Tweetbot supports this.

IndieAuth / Micropub support

Choose timing of tweets — all at once or pace them out by X minutes

Boris, I love this idea of this and how it could work.

If you haven’t come across it, ThreadReaderApp does something similar to this but in a reverse syndication instead of the method you’re describing. It allows one to publish a thread on Twitter and then use ThreadReaderApp to roll the thread up and post a copy of it to one’s website that supports Micropub. I’ve written a bit about how it works here: boffosocko.com/2020/05/28/threadreaderapp-micropub-to-blog/

I’d love to see something more like what you’re describing.

Another interesting option for this that has a lot of the functionality you’re looking for is Kevin Marks’ Noter Live. I know he’s considered adding Micropub functionality to it. I suspect he’d be very open to anyone who’d like to add that or other refinements via pull request to GitHub – kevinmarks/noterlive: A tool for indieweb live noting (aka live tweeting/live blogging). It does post live threads to twitter and currently gives the output as raw HTML that one could cut/paste into their site.

Read on February 17, 2021 at 09:54PM

Replied to Micropub Tweetstorm Builder by Boris

Description

People write tweetstorms because they’re “easier” than whatever their blog setup is. And the constraints of 280 characters at a time makes for both careful sentence construction and flow.

But - then you’ve got this lovely writing that is trapped on Twitter. At best, you come back and copy / paste the tweets back into a blog post.

The idea is a Micropub enabled tweetstorm builder. You log into it with your Twitter account and with Indieauth so that posts end up as one big blog post on your own site, but are sent to Twitter as a tweetstorm / collection.

User Impact

Who would want to use this and why?

Anyone that wants to compose tweetstorms in a richer environment while also having it post to their own site.

Features

PWA

Twitter login

Create a Twitter collection — I actually don’t know what all the features of collections are. Tweetbot supports this.

IndieAuth / Micropub support

Choose timing of tweets — all at once or pace them out by X minutes

Boris, I love this idea of this and how it could work.

If you haven’t come across it, ThreadReaderApp does something similar to this but in a reverse syndication instead of the method you’re describing. It allows one to publish a thread on Twitter and then use ThreadReaderApp to roll the thread up and post a copy of it to one’s website that supports Micropub. I’ve written a bit about how it works here: https://boffosocko.com/2020/05/28/threadreaderapp-micropub-to-blog/

I’d love to see something more like what you’re describing.

Another interesting option for this that has a lot of the functionality you’re looking for is Kevin Marks’ http://www.noterlive.com/. I know he’s considered adding Micropub functionality to it. I suspect he’d be very open to anyone who’d like to add that or other refinements via pull request to https://github.com/kevinmarks/noterlive. It does post live threads to twitter and currently gives the output as raw HTML that one could cut/paste into their site.

Replied to Lets bring back the blogroll to WordPress by Michael Beckwith (Michaelbox)
Come with me as I briefly explore Blogrolls and re-introducing them in 2021 and creating a WordPress Block for their display.
I have so many ideas about this. The first one being that it’s awesome.

While WordPress is about websites, it’s also got a lot of pieces of social media sites hiding under the hood and blogrolls are generally precursors of the following/followed piece.

Blogrolls were traditionally stuck on a small widget, but I think they now deserve their own full pages. I’d love to have one with a list of all the people I follow (subscribe to) as well as a similar one with those who follow me (and this could be implemented with webmention receipts of others who have me on their blogroll). I’ve got versions/mock ups of these pages on my own site already as examples.

Next up is something to make these easier to use and import. I’d love a bookmarklet or a browser extension that I could use one click with to have the person’s page imported into my collection of links that parses the page (perhaps the h-card or meta data) and pulls all the data into the link database.

I always loved the fact that the original generated OPML files (even by category) so that I could dump the list of data from my own site into a feed reader and just go. Keeping this would be awesome, but the original hasn’t been updated in so long it doesn’t use the updated OPML spec

If such a curated list is able to be maintained on my site it would also be cool if I could export it in such a way (similar to OPML) as to dovetail it with social readers like Aperture, Yarns, or other Microsub servers to easily transport or mirror the data there.

Here are some related thoughts: https://boffosocko.com/2017/11/10/a-following-page/

I’m happy to chat about other useful/related features relating to this any time!

Replied to a tweet by Mike Rockwell
That’s what your 2006 self wanted. Your 2021 self deserves a social reader with Micropub support. You’ll get more features, a nicer UI, and more joy in your life.
Replied to a tweet by Rotana TyRotana Ty (Twitter)
Rotana Ty, I’m curious if you’ve tried using any of the IndieWeb plugin suite for WordPress? Webmention/Semantic Linkback plugins for site-to-site notifications/conversation or Micropub plugin and clients for making posting simpler?
Replied to a post by Mike RockwellMike Rockwell (Mike Rockwell)
Just added an h-card to the footer of mike.rockwell.mx. I’m hoping that’s all that’s necessary to get Webmentions to include an avatar image. https://mike.rockwell.mx/asides/780
Most of your pages already have your avatar, name and URL at the top, so you could just add the microformats to those parts there if you wish. I always find that using https://indiewebify.me/ to test against can help.
Replied to My One Word for 2021 is Ideas by Aaron DavisAaron Davis (Read Write Respond)
Reflecting on my year in space last year and my theme of ideas for the new year. For a few years now, inspired by Kath Murdoch, I have been choosing a word to focus on each year. Last year I made a change, where rather than thinking about outcomes, I instead turned to inquiry. Inspired by a few ref...
I like this idea. My own word for the year is “anthropology”, though I haven’t written it out yet as you have.

I can’t help but thinking you picked a helluva a year to choose “space.”

Given your current word, the first few things that come immediately to mind and which you may appreciate are:

  • Matthew Ridley’s talk on When Ideas have sex
  • Richard Dawkins work on the idea of memes in The Selfish Gene (Oxford, 1976). While the whole book is a classic, he’s got a chapter or two specifically on memes where the term was coined.
  • And finally, I was at a presentation last year that had some fascinating framing around the difference between what we mean when we say idea versus concept.

Read on: Feb 6, 2021 at 21:50

Replied to thread by Abide the Twin Damnation (@tindall@cybre.space)Abide the Twin Damnation (@tindall@cybre.space) (Cybrespace)

communities disappearing from self-hosted forums and even Livejournal to places like Tumblr and Twitter, and to a lesser extent Reddit, was a move from spaces we controlled to spaces designed to control us

of course, this happened for good reasons - accessibility first and foremost. it allowed many new communities to form, too. if we want to have control, we need to ensure access too.

phpBB is terrible but it does what it wants to do. same with Discourse, though some design decisions are... odd. mastodon, on the other hand, does _not_ do what it tries to do - build communities around microblogging

what we need is to build federated forum software with two-way syndication - accessible from the Fediverse, from Twitter, from Tumblr, even from IM platforms.

for example - these posts syndicate to Twitter, but comments don't syndicate back, which means I have to maintain a real presence there.

If you like, you could use Brid.gy to get comments and reactions back from Twitter with Webmention support for your site. I’ve outlined some of it for how I’m doing it on WordPress, but the idea is very adaptable for any website out there, and there’s a growing list of pre-existing code one could leverage.

(Hint: this also works for other common social platforms which Bridgy supports. As examples, I’ve got two-way communication set up between my site and Github and Mastodon just to name a few, so I don’t need to actively visit those sites on a regular basis. I pipe most of the content into a social reader like Monocle or Indigenous and reply directly from there.)

Webmention can be used as some of the community glue for things you’ve mentioned in your thread as well. As an example, I can post on my website and syndicate that content to IndieWeb.xyz (using Webmention) where others can discover it (perhaps by category) and interact with it using their own websites. If they have Webmention support as well we can have a site to site conversation that could potentially all be mirrored on IndieWeb.xyz which acts as a conversation and discovery hub.

This ecosystem is slowly growing and flourishing, but we still need work on making it all easier and more accessible as well as helping to guard against potential abuses and bad actors to make things safer for bigger public communities at scale. (I notice you’ve got a great site, that touches on and covers some of these topics like security and identity.)

Replied to a post by Mike Rockwell (mike.rockwell.mx)
Is there actually a benefit to showing the Webmention field on your site? Does it actually get used? It feels like all of the Webmentions are automated through the protocol/API, not manually by copy and pasting a link. I’ve turned it off for now. We’ll see.
There are some sites that have receiving implemented but not sending, and it was primarily meant for that. (This is probably most often people who are using webmention.io as their proxy endpoint by registering and adding a line of code to their header. Something I do with both a TiddlyWiki and MediaWiki installs that don’t have custom software/plugins yet.)

It also serves to help visually indicate that your site supports the protocol if you don’t have a button/badge for it that points to something like https://mike.rockwell.mx/wp-json/webmention/1.0/endpoint. For those that care or are in-the-know there are manual services like https://telegraph.p3k.io/send-a-webmention or http://mention-tech.appspot.com/ which could be used as well.

On some sites I follow, I use those boxes about once or twice a month. I use it a bit more frequently on my own site to manually send myself webmentions from other sites that don’t send them, but which I come across either randomly or via refbacks. 

Replied to a post by Ian Betteridge Ian Betteridge (microblog.ianbetteridge.com)
Something that I haven’t seen anywhere on the Indieweb: is there a simple guide for services which let you replace Twitter, Facebook, Insta, etc etc with more open alternatives? Preferably written with non-technical users in mind?

Micro.blog is one of the best IndieWeb friendly services out there to replace some of these platforms with a user friendly set up. https://indieweb.org/Quick_Start delineates some other services like i.haza.website, Pine.blog, and Typlog which have some great features too depending on what you’re looking for. If you’ve got someone with some modest technical chops to run a small service for you and some friends, Known can be an awesome option too.

 

Replied to a post by Mike Rockwell (mike.rockwell.mx)
I might go back to IFTTT. But I’m going to see how an alternative syndication service works first.

It requires appropriate mark up in your theme, but I like using the Syndication Links plugin for syndicating from my site to Twitter (using Bridgy publish), Micro.blog, Mastodon, and many others. It also advertises syndication endpoints for Micropub clients which can be powerful and convenient too.

Replied to a tweet by Dan York (Twitter)

Dan, since you’re in the WordPress space, there are several pieces in place there. Akismet and other anti-spam tools can still be used to filter webmentions just like any other comment/response on your site.

If you moderate your responses on your site, the webmention plugin has an “approve & always allow” function as well as domain allow-listing for people you know and trust.

It also bears saying: there’s also nothing that says you have to display webmentions on your site either, you can use them simply as notifications on your back end.

In my experience, I’ve also seen people strip active links, scripts, etc. out of their received webmentions as a security precaution. I believe that the WordPress suite of IndieWeb plugins does this by default.

If you need/want to go further, you could work on implementing the Vouch extension of Webmention. Any additional ideas or brainstorming you’ve got to help mitigate these sorts of harms is most welcome.

For the record, for Webmention to work as a protocol, it requires a link to your site to actually appear on a public web page–something neither trackback/pingback required and made them even easier/cheaper to game.