📺 The hidden science of Harry Potter | The Washington Post

Watched The hidden science of Harry Potter by Anna Rothschild from Washington Post

Meet the real-life sorcerers featured in Harry Potter and Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald.

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👓 Is ‘Fantastic Beasts 2’ racist? Not quite. | The Washington Post

Read Is ‘Fantastic Beasts 2’ racist? Not quite. (Washington Post)

Twenty years after the first Harry Potter book was released in the United States, the franchise still has the power to amaze — and offend. To this day, J.K. Rowling’s series is still banned in some schools and libraries for promoting “witchcraft.” But with the release last week of a new trailer for the next film in the fictional universe, “Fantastic Beasts 2: The Crimes of Grindelwald,” Rowling is facing a different sort of backlash. This one shouldn’t be dismissed so easily.

At the heart of today’s Harry Potter controversy is a five-second clip in the “Fantastic Beasts 2” trailer showing South Korean actress Claudia Kim transforming into a massive snake. The scene apparently reveals the backstory behind her character, Nagini, who eventually becomes Voldemort’s pet: She is a “maledictus,” or shape-shifter, cursed to eventually become trapped in a snake’s body.

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👓 Everything you need to know about Nagini | Pottermore

Read Everything you need to know about Nagini (Pottermore)
Lord Voldemort’s terrifying snake, Nagini, is a great source of mystery in the Harry Potter books. Now, it’s been revealed that she will feature in Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald.
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👓 Welcome to Voldemorting, the Ultimate SEO Dis | Wired

Read Welcome to Voldemorting, the Ultimate SEO Dis by Gretchen McCulloch (WIRED)
When writers swap Trump for Cheeto and 45, it's not just a put-down. Removing a keyword is the anti-SEO—transforming your subject into a slippery, ungraspable, swarm.

Surprised she didn’t mention the phenomena of subtweeting, snitch tagging, or dunking which are also closely related to voldemorting.

To my experience, the phrase “bird site” was generally used as a derogatory phrase on Mastodon (represented by a Mastodon character instead of a bird), by people who were fed up by Twitter and the interactions they found there. I recall instances of it as early as April 2017.

In addition to potential SEO implications, this phenomenon is also interesting for its information theoretic implications.

I particularly like the reference in the van der Nagle paper

[…] screenshotting, or making content visible without sending its website traffic – to demonstrate users’ understandings of the algorithms that seek to connect individuals to other people, platforms, content and advertisers, and their efforts to wrest back control.

This seems like an awesome way to skirt around algorithms in social sites as well as not rewarding negative sites with clicks.

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Reply to Equity Unbound Webcomic: Splintered Digital Identities | Kevin Hodgson

Replied to Equity Unbound Webcomic: Splintered Digital Identities by Kevin HodgsonKevin Hodgson (dogtrax.edublogs.org)
I am dipping into Equity Unbound, a new online course/collaboration with Mia Zamora, Maha Bali and Catherine Cronin. They will be working with university students as well as opening things up to other spaces where folks, like you and me, can jump in. (The Twitter tag is here: #unboundeq)  I am always interested in seeing how new offerings can be riffs off previous open learning networks, such as NetNarr, Rhizo, Digiwrimo, CLMOOC, and others.

Kevin, your comic really resonates, particularly for someone who’s got over 200 social media related accounts and identity presences in various places on the internet.

It reminds me of a line I wrote a few months back in an article about the IndieWeb idea of Webmentions for A List Apart entitled Webmentions: Enabling Better Communication on the Internet:

Possibly worst of all, your personal identity on the internet can end up fragmented like so many horcruxes across multiple websites over which you have little, if any, control.

Inherent in this idea is that corporate interests and others who run social sites can disappear, delete, or moderate out of existence any of my writing, photos, audio, video, or other content into the memory hole at any time and for almost any reason. And just like a destroyed horcrux, their doing so takes a bit of my soul (identity) with it each time.

A few years back, I decided to take back my own identity on the web and post everything of interest to me on my own website on my own domain first–a digital commonplace book if you will. Only then do I syndicate it into other communities, websites, or areas as needed. (Even this reply is on my own site before I syndicate it to yours.) As a result, I own a tremendously large part of my online identity (though even at that, a lot of it is published privately for myself or select small audiences).

I hope that as Equity Unbound continues and we explore the ideas of identity, public/private, and related topics, people might consider some of these ideas and implications and potentially work on expanding solutions for students, teachers, and the rest of the world.

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📺 LEGO Harry Potter Hogwarts Castle 2018 full review! 71043 | YouTube

Watched LEGO Harry Potter Hogwarts Castle 2018 full review! 71043 from YouTube

This is pretty awesome! I agree that it could have much more, but it looks like it’d be cool to put together! Perhaps this could be a nice birthday present for someone???

🎞 Watched Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them

Watched Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them from Warner Bros., November 18, 2016
The adventures of writer Newt Scamander in New York's secret community of witches and wizards seventy years before Harry Potter reads his book in school. Directed by David Yates. With Eddie Redmayne, Katherine Waterston, Alison Sudol, Dan Fogler.

Significantly different from the Harry Potter films, but still set in the same world. I’d watch it again, but it wasn’t as solid in story as the original series. I saw the twist at the end coming from a mile away, so sadly that wan’t a surprise.

I initially pegged Eddie Redmayne as the British Johnny Depp and wondered why they didn’t cast the latter only to realize why later in the picture.

Having seen the movie Sing earlier in the day, I note that this was the second movie of the day to feature a major structure which was demolished and then rebuilt in a timelapse sequence.

Edwards Alhambra Renaissance 14 & IMAX, E Main St., Alhambra, CA 91801

Screen 9

Seat: Unassigned

 

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🎞 Watched Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire

Watched Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire from Warner Bros., 2005
When Harry Potter's name emerges from the Goblet of Fire, he becomes a competitor in a grueling battle for glory among three wizarding schools - the Triwizard Tournament. Starring: Eric Sykes, Timothy Spall Runtime: 2 hours, 37 minutes

Coming down the Christmas homestretch. Nothing better than watching Harry Potter movies through the holidays.

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🎞 Watched Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban

Watched Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban from Warner Bros., 2004
Harry, Ron and Hermione return for their third year at Hogwarts, where they are forced to face escaped prisoner, Sirius Black. Starring: Daniel Radcliffe, Rupert Grint, Emma Watson Runtime: 2 hours, 21 minutes

Watched again this afternoon while making an apple pie for Christmas eve dinner.

🎞 Watched Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban

Watched Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban from Warner Bros., 2004
Harry, Ron and Hermione return for their third year at Hogwarts, where they are forced to face escaped prisoner, Sirius Black. Starring: Daniel Radcliffe, Rupert Grint, Emma Watson Runtime: 2 hours, 21 minutes

The best in the series is great via streaming in HD from Amazon through Roku. Watching while I wrap up Christmas presents.

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🎞 Watched Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets

Watched Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets from Warner Bros., 2002
Harry returns to Hogwarts, still famous and a hero, when strange thingsstart to happen... people are turning to stone and no-one knows what, orwho, is doing it. Starring: Daniel Radcliffe, Rupert Grint, Emma Watson Runtime: 2 hours, 40 minutes

Definitely one of the least interesting in the series, but nice to watch a fresh HD copy without any commercials.

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🎞 Watched Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone

Watched Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone from Warner Bros., 2001
Based on the wildly popular J.K. Rowling's book about a young boy who on his eleventh birthday discovers, he is the orphaned boy of two powerful wizards and has unique magical powers. Starring: Daniel Radcliffe, Rupert Grint, Emma Watson Runtime: 2 hours, 32 minutes

I’ve been watching an HD DVR’d copy from ABC Family from 5 years ago. I traded up for a high def version from Amazon and was impressed that it’s even clearer. Who can resist a family favorite during the holidays?

🎞 Watching Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (Warner Bros., 2007)

Watched Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (2007) from imdb.com
Directed by David Yates. With Daniel Radcliffe, Emma Watson, Rupert Grint, Brendan Gleeson. With their warning about Lord Voldemort's return scoffed at, Harry and Dumbledore are targeted by the Wizard authorities as an authoritarian bureaucrat slowly seizes power at Hogwarts.

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🎞 Watching Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (Warner Bros., 2005)

Watched Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (2005) from imdb.com
Directed by Mike Newell. With Daniel Radcliffe, Emma Watson, Rupert Grint, Eric Sykes. Harry finds himself mysteriously selected as an under-aged competitor in a dangerous tournament between three schools of magic.