👓 Casey Affleck Addresses Sexual Harassment Allegations | Variety

Read Casey Affleck Apologizes for ‘Unprofessional’ Behavior Amid Me Too Backlash by Tara Bitran (Variety)
In an interview with the Associated Press, Affleck admitted to contributing to an unprofessional environment on the set of “I’m Still Here,” which was shot in 2008 and 2009. “I tolerated that kind of behavior from other people and I wish that I hadn’t. And I regret a lot of that,” Affleck, who directed, produced, and co-wrote the film, said. “I really did not know what I was responsible for as the boss. I don’t even know if I thought of myself as the boss. But I behaved in a way and allowed others to behave in a way that was really unprofessional. And I’m sorry.”
Someone has either coached him and/or he’s got a great publicist helping him out. He was never eloquent enough to pull off statements like these in my experience.

👓 #MeToo law restricts use of nondisclosure agreements in sexual misconduct cases | LA Times

Read #MeToo law restricts use of nondisclosure agreements in sexual misconduct cases (latimes.com)
Among victims and advocates, an important step in dismantling the pervasive problem of harassment and the system that has kept it under wraps for so long is to void or curb the use of NDAs to settle sexual abuse cases.
The tough part is recreating a better system and predicting the potential future abuses that may continue in such a system. How do we enforce fairness fairly? What unintended consequences might there be?

👓 Pausing Twitter | Read Write Collect

Read Pausing Twitter by Aaron DavisAaron Davis (Read Write Collect)
This is another insightful reflection from Pernille Ripp. It continues on from her apology earlier this year for stepping back. It makes me wonder what happens to the ‘edu-influencer‘ when they step back? As much agree with Joe Sanfileppo about the power and potential of being connected, what happens when those people stop answering?
Some of this reminds me a bit of CAA’s mantra to have their agents try to occupy all the buying executives’ time within their coverage areas with CAA clients calls and meetings as a means of not only controlling the conversation, but preventing the competition from having a chance.

I’m also reminded of Kathleen Fitzgerald’s recent post Engage. Disengage. Repeat.

👓 Interviews | Victoria Wisdom

Read Interviews by Victoria Wisdom (Screenplay Wisdom)
(this interview originally appeared on AEI Online) InZide: Can you give a little background on yourself and how you arrived at where you are today? VW: Let me see, double literature major at NYU. I…

👓 Consulting | Victoria Wisdom

Read Consulting by Victoria Wisdom (Screenplay Wisdom)
When I began teaching screenwriting a few years ago, I found that I was being rushed at the end of classes by writers eager to have their scripts read. As some of the classes had large numbers of s…

👓 Hackers Are Stealing Influencer Instagram Accounts By Promising Lucrative Brand Deals | The Atlantic

Read How Hackers Are Stealing High-Profile Instagram Accounts (The Atlantic)
In the Wild West of “influencer” marketing, there are few protections and plenty of easy marks.
Of the multi-billion dollar business and the issues with needing to give away one’s password to be tracked within this field, the real loss here seems to be that Instagram isn’t building infrastructure for their users to take advantage of these opportunities. Even if they were only taking a small fraction of the income for facilitating the market, they’re missing out on hundreds of millions.

It’s not mentioned here, but the fact that there are businesses built around the idea of “link in bio” means that Instagram really isn’t innovating on their platform.

Is Instagram really so deaf to the needs of their userbase?

👓 Agent, Auburn native subject of Wall Street Journal feature | Auburn Citizen

Read Agent, Auburn native subject of Wall Street Journal feature by David Wilcox (Auburn Citizen)
Matt DelPiano is used to being a step removed from stardom, but a Sept. 24 story in The Wall Street Journal finds him front and center.
Ha!

👓 David Boies Pleads Not Guilty | New York Times

Read David Boies Pleads Not Guilty (nytimes.com)
The superlawyer in such cases as Bush v. Gore and the fight for gay marriage rights makes no apologies for representing Harvey Weinstein and Theranos with zeal.

👓 Why Le’Veon Bell Might Make More Money If He Ends His Holdout Now | Five Thirty Eight

Read Why Le’Veon Bell Might Make More Money If He Ends His Holdout Now by Josh Hermsmeyer (Five Thirty Eight)
Last weekend, Steelers running back Le’Veon Bell sat out the first game of the regular season rather than play under the NFL franchise tag. Slated to earn $14.5 million in guaranteed money in 2018, Bell loses out on $855,529 each week he fails to report. The franchise tag would make Bell the third highest paid running back in the NFL this season — but only if he actually plays. Around the league, there is a wide range of speculation on how long Bell’s holdout will last. ESPN’s Adam Schefter reports that his sources believe Bell could be back by the end of September, while others note his holdout could conceivably last through Week 10.

👓 Jodie Whittaker demanded equal pay to Peter Capaldi for Doctor Who | The Independent

Read Jodie Whittaker demanded equal pay to Peter Capaldi for Doctor Who (The Independent)
'Equal pay is a notion that should be supported!'

👓 Defending Trump, Roseanne Wants Her Show to Be ‘Realistic’ | The New York Times

Read Defending Trump, Roseanne Wants Her Show to Be ‘Realistic’ (nytimes.com)
Roseanne Barr said she was not an “apologist” for Mr. Trump but wanted the reboot of her sitcom to address the strong divide in the country.
I’m seeing a pattern of Roseanne  “quitting” Twitter, but returning to her detriment. I’m aware of morals clauses in countries like France, but I’m curious if, with social media, we’ll see more and more countries in the U.S. begin to add such clauses to talent contracts?

🎧 ‘The Daily’: Sexual Harassment’s Toll on Careers | New York Times

Listened to ‘The Daily’: Sexual Harassment’s Toll on Careers by Michael Barbaro from nytimes.com

In a case that highlights the economic consequences of sexual harassment and retaliation, Ashley Judd is suing Harvey Weinstein for the damage he did to her career after she rebuffed his advances.

And in the second part of the episode, three women who pioneered the language of consent reflect on being far ahead of their time on the politics of sex.

On today’s episode:

• Jodi Kantor, one of the investigative reporters at The New York Times who broke the story about the raft of sexual harassment accusations against Mr. Weinstein, discusses the implications of a new lawsuit.

• We hear from Juliet Brown, Christelle Evans and Bethany Saltman, who helped to establish an affirmative consent policy for sex at Antioch College in 1990.

Background reading:

• Ms. Judd filed a lawsuit on Monday accusing Mr. Weinstein of harming her career by spreading lies about her after she rejected his sexual requests. Her claim is corroborated by the director Peter Jackson, who revealed last year that Mr. Weinstein had warned him not to hire the actress for his “Lord of the Rings” franchise.

• Antioch College students developed a sexual consent policy in the 1990s. It was mocked by much of the rest of the world. Since then, campuses across the country have caught up, and a new generation of Antioch students is pushing the conversation further.

• A Times video journalist recalls being asked to sign a verbal consent form during a visit to Antioch College in 2004, long before the language of sexual consent had entered the mainstream.

It’s long been an open secret in casting related discussions that people’s character and habits are maligned to push decisions in one direction or another, and often in ways that harm not only the person’s career, but their future potential for hiring. In most other industries, this would be easily litigated or at least brought up. I’m glad to see it may be banned outright as a result of cases like these.

Having gone to college in the 90’s myself I also remember the Antioch College agreements. Though they may have gone a bit too far, it’s obvious they were generally right in re-balancing the power in relationships as well as being well ahead of their times.

👓 What’s An Inclusion Rider? Here’s The Story Behind Frances McDormand’s Closing Words | NPR

Read What's An Inclusion Rider? Here's The Story Behind Frances McDormand's Closing Words by Colin Dwyer (NPR.org)
"I have two words to leave with you tonight," the actress told the audience after winning her Oscar: "inclusion rider." But she didn't define those words onstage — so, here's a helpful primer. Simply put: It's a stipulation that actors and actresses can ask (or demand) to have inserted into their contracts, which would require a certain level of diversity among a film's cast and crew. For instance, an A-list actor negotiating to join a film could use the inclusion rider to insist that "tertiary speaking characters should match the gender distribution of the setting for the film, as long as it's sensible for the plot," Stacy L. Smith explained in a 2014 column that introduced the idea in The Hollywood Reporter.

👓 APA Agent Tyler Grasham Fired From Agency Following Sexual Assault Allegations | Deadline Hollywood

Read APA Agent Tyler Grasham Fired From Agency Following Sexual Assault Allegations by Anita Busch (Deadline Hollywood)
Updated 3:22 PM: Tyler Grasham has now been fired from APA. “Tyler Grasham has been terminated, effective immediately,” said a spokesman for the agency. The move comes as one of those who alleged he had been sexually assaulted said earlier today he was going to filed a police report with the LAPD this afternoon and he says he has. Lucas Ozarowski, a 27-year-old film and TV editor, says he also was assaulted by Grasham after Blaise Godbe Lipman first spoke up on Facebook talking about what he faced from the agent while seeking representation 10 years ago as a child actor.

👓 Matt Damon, Russell Crowe Reportedly Helped Kill a 2004 Harvey Weinstein Article | Vulture

Read Ex-NYT Reporter Claims Weinstein Asked Damon to Help Kill 2004 Story; NYT Denies (Vulture)
The Wrap editor Sharon Waxman trades accusations with top Times editors, says Weinstein pressured celebrity friends to help kill the story.