👓 What Do Jotted Talking Points Say About Trump’s Empathy? | The New York Times

What Do Jotted Talking Points Say About Trump’s Empathy? by Julie Hirschfeld Davis (New York Times)
Consoler in chief has been a role that President Trump has been slow and somewhat reluctant to embrace — especially in contrast to his predecessor.

Interesting that they seemed to actually find someone to indicate that he had a tiny piece of empathy here when all other evidence seems to be to the contrary.

Syndicated copies to:

👓 Analysis | The real reason Congress banned assault weapons in 1994 — and why it worked | Washington Post

Analysis | The real reason Congress banned assault weapons in 1994 — and why it worked by Christopher Ingram (Washington Post)
The ban's critics say it failed, but they're misinterpreting what it was intended to do to begin with.

Not as in-depth as I would have liked, but some interesting quick hit statistics. There are things we could do to prevent these occurences, but yet again it appears as if the almighty dollar will somehow win out in the end.

Syndicated copies to:

📖 Read pages 75-96 of Ramona the Brave by Beverly Cleary

📖 Read pages 75-96, Chapter 5: Owl Trouble, of Ramona The Brave by Beverly Cleary (William Morrow and Company, , ISBN: 0-688-22015-0)

The comment about Ramona being brave comes from this relatively lackluster chapter in which Ramona gets upset with her apparent choice of being called a tattletale or allowing Susan to be a terrible copycat. I can attest that the picture of a six year old making a growl-ly face and panther hands is true to life.

🎧 This Week in Tech 654 Bye, Bye Mr. Ajit Pai | TWiT.TV

This Week in Tech 654 Bye, Bye Mr. Ajit Pai by Leo Laporte from TWiT.tv
News publishers violated copyright by embedding a tweet. Are video games to blame for the Florida school shooting? A drone causes a helicopter to crash. Are we seeing the end of Facebook? Apple isn't making as much money on the HomePod compared to other products. The controversial Snapchat update. What to expect from Mobile World Congress. An amazing $300M deal for a showrunner at Netflix, and more.

Owen was spot on in a lot of his assessment in this episode. His advice on raising kids is very sharp here.

The discussion of the Netflix deal was a bit shallow. I suspect the massive multi-million dollar deal had some serious performance pegs set into it, otherwise it doesn’t pay out as richly. It’s remniscent of some of Leo Laporte’s recent coverage of Casey Neistat’s deal unwinding at CNN. While it was a multi-million dollar deal, there were performance thresholds pegged in which he didn’t perform, so he ended up with relatively little in the process. The bigger issue in that case was that it appeared that neither CNN or Neistat had any solid idea of what he would be doing at CNN before entering the deal. I highly suspect this isn’t the case in Ryan Murphy’s situation, though he may have some material that is tied up in prior deals which may hobble him moving forward. Cases when major creatives/producers have moved from one home to another don’t always do well however.

Syndicated copies to:

👓 In One Tweet, Kylie Jenner Wiped Out $1.3 Billion of Snap’s Market Value | Bloomberg

In One Tweet, Kylie Jenner Wiped Out $1.3 Billion of Snap’s Market Value by Justina Vasquez (Bloomberg.com)
Snap Inc.’s flagship platform has lost some luster, at least according to one social-media influencer in the Kardashian-Jenner clan.

I’m surprised that platforms like this don’t have their biggest users doing beta testing of their product to prevent things just like this from happening.

It’s also a good example of why having my own site is valuable: no one can force changes on me if I don’t really want them.

Syndicated copies to:

👓 Anchor’s new app offers everything you need to podcast | Tech Crunch

Anchor’s new app offers everything you need to podcast by Sarah Perez (TechCrunch)
Broadcasting app Anchor, which helps anyone record and share audio, is relaunching its app today with a new focus on serving the larger podcaster community... Of course, there is one concern for professional podcasters migrating to Anchor’s platform – and that’s whether it will be around in the long-term. For now, the company isn’t generating revenue – it’s living off its funding. Podcasters who pay for hosting or self-host don’t generally have to worry with whether they’ll one day have to quickly migrate elsewhere because the company is shutting down or being acquired – and that’s always a concern with startups.

I appreciate that they both give and highlight some reasonable caveats about using this Anchor given its start-up nature. Mentions of potential site-deaths should have been de rigueur for the past decade and change.

It also makes me wonder why an app like this, which has some great and useful higher end utility, doesn’t offer its production service as the product? Sure they can offer the hosting and other bits to the general public, but for the professionals who are already out there, why not give them inexpensive access to the root production service and then allow immediate export so that the company could host the end product on their own website? This would amount to a very solid PESOS service. In fact, they could probably offer the production side for free for the big players for the advertising leverage to gain the smaller players in the space.

I’ve noticed some very large publishing concerns, notably The Atlantic Interview recently, who are sadly relying on third party services to host their podcast content. For large companies that actually have a team that manages their presence to at least some extent, there’s really no reason that they should be relying on a third party to be holding the URLs to their content.

I’m curious to try this out now for my own too-often-neglected microcast. Having a simpler and more straight-forward production flow would certainly help lower the bar for making it even despite my already low requirements for making it.

Syndicated copies to:

👓 Shriver Hall renovation expands to include more enhancements—and a longer timeline | The Hub

Shriver Hall renovation expands to include more enhancements—and a longer timeline by Dennis O'Shea (The Hub)
Homewood campus performance space now expected to reopen in early 2019 with improved sound system, seating, and much more. The Shriver Hall renovation project, now slated for completion in early 2019, includes replacing the auditorium’s uncomfortable and often broken seating. Seat removal took place in the fall.

A few years ago they actually took out the awesome sound system because it didn’t “fit in” with the new orchestra shell and handicapped elevator access to the stage that the HSO felt made it too “cramped”. I have no expectation that this will make it a better place for film screenings. I’m also sure the seating capacity will be far less than it was before. Alas…

Syndicated copies to:

📅 WordCamp Orange County, June 9-10, 2018

Attending WordCamp Orange County, June 9-10, 2018
WordCamp Orange County is a great place to learn meet, talk, and immerse yourself in everything WordPress. From the absolute beginner to the hardest of hardcore developers, WordCamp Orange County will have something for you.

Putting this on my calendar to attend later this year. Waiting patiently for tickets to go on sale.

Syndicated copies to:

📅 Friday Coffee Meetup: Building Companies While Running Startup Accelerators on Three Continents

Attending Building Companies While Running Startup Accelerators on Three Continents
From Hong Kong, to Los Angeles, to the Vatican. How running three very different startup accelerators over five years changed the way I think about entrepreneurship. Multiple program formats, 100+ companies, tens of millions in funding, lots of customers, exits, all across three continents. The talk will focus on: • Commonalities growing companies face across locations. • Getting results: How I try to trick people into learning. • Next steps in thinking about the future of company growth. Bio Paul Orlando enables companies to grow. He is Incubator Director and Adjunct Professor of Entrepreneurship at USC. Paul has founded and operated successful startup accelerator programs in Hong Kong (focused on mobile development), Los Angeles (focused on growing a wide range of companies with founders affiliated with USC), and Rome (the Laudato Si accelerator, partnered with the Vatican and focused on environmental technology). Companies Paul has worked with have raised tens of millions in capital, served millions of customers, and have been acquired. He has authored several related academic case studies available on Harvard Business Publishing. Paul also helps larger institutions innovate, develop, and grow, especially in lowering the risk of innovation projects, speeding up learning cycles, and transitioning past legacy business models and products. Paul has been featured in media including Forbes, TechCrunch, Fast Company, and the Wall Street Journal. He was a winner at the TechCrunch Disrupt Hackathon. Paul has a BA from Cornell, an MBA from Columbia, and speaks Mandarin. Twitter handle: @porlando Speaker email: paul.orlando@gmail.com Date: Friday, February 23, 2018 from 8:15 AM to 9:30 AM Location: Cross Campus, 85 N. Raymond Avenue · Pasadena, CA Venue is located on the 2nd floor. Free street parking until 11:00 am; except where valet signs are posted. 90 minutes free parking is also available at nearby parking lots.
Syndicated copies to:

Recap of Los Angeles Area Homebrew Website Club February 21, 2018

After a relatively quiet quiet writing hour where I worked on acquisition posts a bit, people began arriving just before the 6:30 pm official start time.

I kicked off the meeting with a quick overview of IndieWeb’s concepts and principles for newcomers. As a mini-case study I talked a bit about some of my work and conversations earlier today about thinking about adding acquisition posts to my website and the way in which I’m approaching the problem.

Asher Silberman was glad to be back at a meeting. He has recently been working on more content over functionality.

Micah Cambre showed off a gorgeous development version of the new theme he’s building for his site which is a super clean and pared down theme based on the Sage platform using WordPress. He’s hoping to finish it shortly so he can relaunch his personal site at http://asuh.com. He spent some time talking about the process of using David Shanske’s IndieWebified version of the Twenty Sixteen theme as a template for adding microformats and functionality to the Sage set up.

Richard Hopp, a gen2/gen3 user who is completely new to the community and interested in learning, has a personal domain at http://www.ricahardhopp.com/ on which he’s installed WordPress. He’s currently considering whether he’d like to begin blogging soon and what other functionality he’d like to have on his site. He’s relatively new to Facebook, having only joined about six months ago. On the professional side, he does some governmental related work and has some large collections of documents that he’s also doing some research for in consideration of how to best put them on the web for ease of search and use.

I wrapped up the demo portion with a quick showing of how I leveraged the power of the Post Kinds Plugin to facetiously add chicken posts to my site as a prelude to doing a tad more work to begin adding explicit follow posts.

We took a short break to take a photo of the group.

In the end of the evening we talked over a handful of broad ideas including user interface, webactions, and Twitter interactions.

We wrapped things up with a demo of how I use the URL Forwarder app on Android to post to my website via mobile. We then used some of this documentation to try to help Asher fix his previously broken browser bookmarklets to hopefully work better with the Post Kinds Plugin. I spent a few minutes to create a similar bookmarklet to add the ability to more easily add follow posts to my website since I hadn’t done it after adding them last week.

Syndicated copies to: