👓 A university's closure and its implications for online learning, adult student markets | Inside Higher Ed

Read A university's closure and its implications for online learning, adult student markets (Inside Higher Ed)
The story of an innovative university's shutdown says as much about the landscape for online learning as it does about one campus's decisions.

I didn’t expect institutions like this to begin closing for several more years, but apparently a perfect storm of circumstances and competitive forces is starting to see some smaller, old institutions begin to close.

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📺 “The Good Doctor” More | ABC

Watched "The Good Doctor" More from ABC
Directed by Mike Listo. With Freddie Highmore, Nicholas Gonzalez, Antonia Thomas, Chuku Modu. The team needs to quickly discover the truth behind a young college student's unexplained injuries before his condition worsens; after losing a prized possession, Shaun's distraction during a surgical procedure may risk more than his job.
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📺 “The Good Doctor” Smile | ABC

Watched "The Good Doctor" Smile from ABC
Directed by Bill D'Elia. With Freddie Highmore, Nicholas Gonzalez, Antonia Thomas, Chuku Modu. Dr. Shaun Murphy questions the need for an elective surgery that will allow his young patient to smile for the first time. Meanwhile, Dr. Claire Brown and Dr. Morgan Reznick discover that their patient lied about her identity.
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👓 Can we #IndieWeb Google Scholar? #HigherEd | Greg McVerry

Read Can we #IndieWeb Google Scholar? #HigherEd by Greg McVerry (jgregorymcverry.com)
So during my (ongoing) microformats crash course I have styled many citations. Writing an APA citation in html with proper markup take time. A lot of time when you write a lot of citations. While I would consider a canonical link back to to a piece listed or displayed on an author’s website as leg...

Nothing warms my heart more than talk of furthering the idea of making academic samizdat easier and more prevalent. Some of the sketched ideas here are a necessary start.

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👓 Trump Allies Don’t See “Three-Dimensional Chess” In Dinesh D’Souza’s Pardon | BuzzFeed

Read Trump Allies Don’t See “Three-Dimensional Chess” In Dinesh D’Souza’s Pardon by Tarini Parti, Chris Geidner (BuzzFeed)
President Donald Trump's announcement that he was pardoning far-right commentator Dinesh D'Souza, who pleaded guilty in 2014 to campaign finance fraud, caught many in Trump world by surprise Thursday morning, but they insisted it was not indicative of possible pardons for Trump allies ensnared in the Russia probe.

The former official said he doesn’t think Trump is playing “the sort of three-dimensional chess people ascribe to decisions like this. More often than not he’s just eating the pieces.”

This certainly gets the prize for the quote of the year concerning Donald Trump.

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Facepiles not displaying avatars

Filed an Issue pfefferle/wordpress-semantic-linkbacks (GitHub)
More meaningful linkbacks

Apparently the v3.7.7 update seems to break the display of avatar images in facepiles for likes, bookmarks, etc. Instead of showing the expected avatar image, it’s showing the author’s name wrapped with an href for the originating site.

It’s not just my site either as I notice that the facepiles at https://ramblinggit.com/2018/05/241/ (using Sempress) are also displaying the same way.

I’d simultaneously updated the Webmention plugin and tried uninstalling and reinstalling both plugins as well as checking a variety of settings (including the discussion setting for showing Avatars) and uninstalling a variety of potential conflicting plugins, but to no avail.

I know there were recent changes for privacy related pieces, perhaps this is the cause?

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🔖 Learn Japanese Online with Podcasts | JapanesePod101

Bookmarked Learn Japanese Online with Podcasts (JapanesePod101)
The fastest, easiest, and most fun way to learn Japanese and Japanese culture. Start speaking Japanese in minutes with audio and video lessons, audio dictionary, and learning community!
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reply to tkasasagi tweet

Replied to a tweet by tkasasagitkasasagi (Twitter)

I hope you do blog about it, I’m sure many would find it useful. I’ve been using my own website as a commonplace book for a while now, not only for blogging as you’ve considered, but also to bookmark interesting things, to highlight and make notes of what I read, and generally use it as my online notebook/research/study space. I do post some personal tidbits, but a large amount of what I post (both research and personal) is actually private and only viewable by me. Perhaps worth considering as you continue your studies which others have interest in as well?

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Read doesn’t have an option to facepile in discussion settings

Filed an Issue pfefferle/wordpress-semantic-linkbacks (GitHub)
More meaningful linkbacks

It looks like the new “read” functionality for mentions automatically facepiles them anyway, but I’ve noticed that the settings at /wp-admin/options-discussion.php#semantic_linkbacks doesn’t include a checkbox for reads.

This really isn’t an issue (at least for me), but you may want to be aware of it or tweak it for parity’s sake.

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🔖 Taft Test – Web Dev Placeholder Image Generator

Bookmarked Taft Test - Web Dev Placeholder Image Generator (tafttest.com)
Does your site pass the Taft Test? Generate or swap images of Taft for web development.

I wish I had lots of bookmarklets that did quirky things like this. Interestingly this one has a relatively useful use-case in addition to its unintended comedic service.

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Reply to Greg McVerry about Hypothesis

Replied to a post by Greg McVerry (jgregorymcverry.com)
@chrisaldrich Wouldn’t it be neat if @hypothesis was also a micropub client or used the API so I could PESOS each annotation to my blog as a quote post-kind? So cool @xolotl is coming coming to #indieweb summit. Know the markup doesn’t match but that ain’t a hard fix. Has to be somefun ways regardless of tech to make wordpress and open annotation talk.

There is the (abandoned?) Hypothesis Aggregator plugin  which Nate has worked on a bit that allows a relatively easy PESOS workflow from Hypothes.is to WordPress, but you’re right that it would be nice to have a micropub version that would work for all CMSs.

Personally, I’d also love them to support Webmention which I think would be generally useful as well. There are obvious use cases for it in addition to an anti-abuse one which I’ve written about before. Perhaps if it were supported and had better anti-troll or NIPSA (Not In Public Site Areas) features folks like Audrey Watters might not block it.

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Reads, Listens, Watches, and Editable Webmention Types and Avatars in the IndieWeb WordPress Suite

I’ve been meaning to write regular updates to highlight some of the useful changes in the functionality of the IndieWeb suite of WordPress plugins, but never gotten around to it. There’s been a few really interesting ones lately, so I thought I’d start. Observant watchers who read through either the code or even the scant change logs before they update their code may catch some of these features, but sometimes interesting tidbits can slip by the most vigilant. Here are some interesting recent ones:

Display of Reads, Listens, and Watches in comments sections

David Shanske’s excellent Post Kinds Plugin allows one to post what they’re reading, listening to, or watching in simple IndieWeb fashion. (Examples of these on my site: read posts, listen posts, watch posts.) These posts types automatically include the appropriate microformats classes so the user doesn’t need to bother doing them manually. For a long time when replying to another’s site, bookmarking it, or even mentioning it when also using the Webmentions plugin would send the site a Webmention that would generally cause it to show up as a native comment, bookmark or mention. With an update late last year, from within the Discussion settings in WordPress, one could set toggles so that many of these webmentions could be displayed as facepiles. Other broadly unsupported post types would typically default to a simple mention.

Recently David Shanske and I started a podcast, and he thought it would be useful if his site could accept listen posts and show them visually within his comments section just like these replies, bookmarks, and mentions. Thus over the past month he’s added code to the Semantic Linkbacks Plugin to add the functionality for these types of posts to properly render showing facepiles for listens, reads, and watches.

This is what webmentions of listen posts  look like on his site in his comments section:

User Interface example of how listen posts on David Shanske’s podcast appear on his site

What’s happening

Listen (or scrobble) posts can send webmentions (or notifications) to the original content potentially with the experimental listen-of microformat. In the case of scrobbles of podcasts, these webmentions could be displayed as “Listens” which would provide the canonical copy of the podcast some indicator of its popularity and actual audience. It is tremendously difficult to obtain data on the actual number of listens within most of the podcast community and typically a fraction of the number of downloads must be used as an indicator of the actual reach. Being able to display listens could potentially be a boon to the podcasting market, particularly with respect to advertising as this type of open social web functionality spreads.

Similarly read posts with the read-of microformat and watches with watch-of will be accepted and show up within the comments section. Like the previous types, they can be set to display as facepiles within the user interface.

From the Discussion options settings page (typically at: /wp-admin/options-discussion.php#semantic_linkbacks) one can choose the mention types one wants to have appear as facepiles within their comments section.

Knowing that this read functionality would be available, this week I helped ColoradoBoulevard.net set up their site to be able to accept and display reads of their articles. Here’s an example from their site:

The display of a read post on ColoradoBoulevard.net

I haven’t yet seen one for watches in the wild yet, but maybe you’ll be either the first  to send or receive one?

The microformats on these posts is generally considered to be experimental, but with the ~500+ users of this suite of tools as well as others who are already using them on other sites, they’ve now taken a dramatic step into the open internet and more widespread use and potential official adoption.

Editable Webmention Types and Avatars

Webmention Types

Just yesterday, I spent a few minutes in the IndieWeb chat helping someone to laboriously delve into their mySQL databaset and find a particular snippet of data so they could manually change a received webmention from being a simple mention to being a reply so that it would display as a native comment on their website. I’ve often done this to take what sometimes seem like simple mentions and change them to replies to reveal the richer content they often contain for the broader conversation. Sadly the process is boring, laborious, and fraught with potential ways to mess things up.

As of this weekend, this process is no longer necessary. One can now go to the admin interface for their comments and webmentions (found at the path /wp-admin/edit-comments.php), click on edit for the particular comment they’re changing and then scroll down to reveal a droplist interface to be able to manually change the webmention type.

Samantic Linkbacks Data metabox within the comment editing interface on WordPress. One can use the dropbox to change the webmention type as well as manually update the commenter’s avatar.

As another example of a use for this functionality, perhaps you’ve received a listen mention on one of your podcast episodes that has a lot of useful notes or commentary germane to your episode? Instead of hiding it as a simple listen, why not change the type to reply to allow a richer conversation around your content? After all, with a reasonable reply it will be implicit that the commenter actually listened to the episode, right?

Avatars

Because there is currently no functionality in WordPress for saving or caching the avatars of commenters via webmention, when users change their profile images on siloed services like Facebook, Twitter, et al. the link to their old avatars quits working and they were displaying blank spaces. This is an unfortunate form of linkrot, but one that can become more visually apparent over time.

Likes and Reposts concatenated on my site now after converting them into facepiles. They still give the social “proof” and indicate the interaction, but don’t interfere in the conversation now–especially when there are hundreds of them.

As one can see in the image for the commenting edit box above, the field for the Avatar is now editable. This means one can update out-of-date or blank avatars. One now also has the ability to moderate/edit or easily remove/switch avatars if users are sending inappropriate photos for one’s site’s audience.​​​​​​​​​

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🔖 How To Code in Python: Using Manifold to Deliver an Open Educational Resource | Building Manifold

Bookmarked How To Code in Python: Using Manifold to Deliver an Open Educational Resource (blog.manifoldapp.org)

Recently, my eBook on Python programming, How To Code in Python 3, was made available as a Manifold publication. I would like to offer my perspective to the Manifold community to give some background on the work and how I believe the Manifold platform provides additional layers of value to the text through providing a place for learning and idea exchange in both university communities and broader publics.

An interesting article about OER relating to a book that looks interesting to read.

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👓 Introducing Janeway – the new open source publishing software | Birkbeck, University of London

Read Introducing Janeway – the new open source publishing software from Birkbeck (bbk.ac.uk)
The Birkbeck Centre for Technology and Publishing has released a new scholarly communications platform, Janeway, as an open-source download.
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📺 Why Manifold? from Zach Davis | Vimeo

Watched Why Manifold? by Zach Davis from Vimeo

Welcome to Manifold. The intuitive, collaborative, open-source platform for scholarly publishing you’ve been waiting for.

Publishers already work with authors, license copyrights, and create printed books. Let Manifold handle the web-based editions. You can easily convert your existing files into online publications, and Manifold’s open-source platform provides a beautiful, deep reading experience that fosters community and encourages discussion.

Manifold wants to extend the reach and power of academic publishing. That's why we've made Manifold intuitive, open source, and free to use. But we can't do it without your help. Learn more, or get started today at manifoldapp.org

Why Manifold? from Zach Davis on Vimeo.

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